Evidence and evolution (5)

“Tout étant fait pour une fi n, tout est nécessairement pour la meilleure fi n. Remarquez bien que les nez ont été faits pour porter des lunettes, aussi avons-nous des lunettes.” Voltaire, Candide, Chapitre 1.

I am now done with my review of Sober’s Evidence and Evolution: The Logic Behind the Science, Posting about each chapter along the way helped me a lot to write down the review over the past few days. Its conclusion is that

Evidence and Evolution is very well-written, with hardly any typo (the unbiasedness property of AIC is stated at the bottom of page 101 with the expectation symbol E on the wrong side of the equation, Figure 3.8c is used instead of Figure 3.7c on page 204, Figure 4.7 is used instead of Figure 4.8 on page 293, Simon Tavaré’s name is always spelled Taveré, vaules rather than values is repeated four times on page 339). The style is sometimes too light and often too verbose, with an abundance of analogies that I regard as sidetracking, but this makes for an easier reading (except for the sentence “the key to answering the second question is that the observation that X = 1 and Y = 1 produces stronger evidence favoring CA over SA the lower the probability is that the ancestors postulated by the two hypotheses were in state 1”, on page 314, that still eludes me!). As detailed in this review, I have points of contentions with the philosophical views about testing in Evidence and Evolution as well as about the methods exposed therein, but this does not detract from the appeal of reading the book. (The lack of completely worked out statistical hypotheses in realistic settings remains the major issue in my criticism of the book.) While the criticisms of the Bayesian paradigm are often shallow (like the one on page 97 ridiculing Bayesians drawing inference based on a single observation), there is nothing fundamentally wrong with the statistical foundations of the book. I therefore repeat my earlier recommendation in favour of Evidence and Evolution, Chapters 1 and (paradoxically) 5 being the easier entries. Obviously, readers familiar with Sober’s earlier papers and books will most likely find a huge overlap with those but others will gather Sober’s viewpoints on the notion of testing hypotheses in a (mostly) unified perspective.

And, as illustrated by the above quote, I found the sentence from Voltaire’s Candide I wanted to include. Of course, this 12 page review may be overly long for the journal it was intended for, Human Genetics, in which case I will have to find another outlet for the current arXived version. But I enjoyed reading this book with a pencil and gathered enough remarks along the way to fill those twelve pages.

3 Responses to “Evidence and evolution (5)”

  1. A related tribune in the New York Times….

  2. […] review of Sober’s Evidence and Evolution: The Logic Behind the Science first polished on the ‘Og […]

  3. […] read (and comment) in the coming months. I just had a few words with who told me he had worked on Seber’s Evidence and Evolution as part of his PhD thesis, so I wished we had had more time to chat about that! (Steve has proposed […]

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