Maximum likelihood vs. likelihood-free quantum system identification in the atom maser

This paper (arXived a few days ago) compares maximum likelihood with different ABC approximations in a quantum physic setting and for an atom maser modelling that essentially bears down to a hidden Markov model. (I mostly blanked out of the physics explanations so cannot say I understand the model at all.) While the authors (from the University of Nottingham, hence Robin’s statue above…) do not consider the recent corpus of work by Ajay Jasra and coauthors (some of which was discussed on the ‘Og), they get interesting findings for an equally interesting model. First, when comparing the Fisher informations on the sole parameter of the model, the “Rabi angle” φ, for two different sets of statistics, one gets to zero at a certain value of the parameter, while the (fully informative) other is maximum (Figure 6). This is quite intriguing, esp. give the shape of the information in the former case, which reminds me of (my) inverse normal distributions. Second, the authors compare different collections of summary statistics in terms of ABC distributions against the likelihood function. While most bring much more uncertainty in the analysis, the whole collection recovers the range and shape of the likelihood function, which is nice. Third, they also use a kolmogorov-Smirnov distance to run their ABC, which is enticing, except that I cannot fathom from the paper when one would have enough of a sample (conditional on a parameter value) to rely on what is essentially an estimate of the sampling distribution. This seems to contradict the fact that they only use seven summary statistics. Or it may be that the “statistic” of waiting times happens to be a vector, in which case a Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance can indeed be adopted for the distance… The fact that the grouped seven-dimensional summary statistic provides the best ABC fit is somewhat of a surprise when considering the problem enjoys a single parameter.

“However, in practice, it is often difficult to find an s(.) which is sufficient.”

Just a point that irks me in most ABC papers is to find quotes like the above, since in most models, it is easy to show that there cannot be a non-trivial sufficient statistic! As soon as one leaves the exponential family cocoon, one is doomed in this respect!!!

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