modern cosmology as a refutation of theism

Central Park, New York, Sep. 25, 2011

While I thought the series run by The Stone on the philosophy [or lack thereof] of religions was over, it seems there are more entries.  This week, I read with great pleasure the piece written by Tim Maudlin on the role played by recent results in (scientific) cosmology in refuting theist arguments.

“No one looking at the vast extent of the universe and the completely random location of homo sapiens within it (in both space and time) could seriously maintain that the whole thing was intentionally created for us.” T. Maudlin

What I particularly liked in his arguments is the role played by randomness, with an accumulation of evidence of the random nature and location of Earth and human beings, which and who appear more and more at the margins of the Universe rather than the main reason for its existence. And his clear rejection of the argument of fine-tuned cosmological constants as an argument in favour of the existence of a watchmaker. (Argument that was also deconstructed in Seber’s book.) And obviously his final paragraph that “Atheism is the default position in any scientific inquiry”. This may be the strongest entry in the whole series.

2 Responses to “modern cosmology as a refutation of theism”

  1. eyeontheuniverse Says:

    Theism does not require that the world was intentionally created for humans.

    • Indeed. This is somewhat the problem with the philosophy of religions, namely that there always is a version of theism that fits the previous objections… This version of theism is acknowledged by Tim Maudlin but he also evacuates it by pointing out it remains at the level of a concept, since no established religion holds a creed where humanity is a random occurrence.

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