single variable transformation approach to MCMC

I read the newly arXived paper “On Single Variable Transformation Approach to Markov Chain Monte Carlo” by Dey and Bhattacharya on the pleasant train ride between Bristol and Coventry last weekend. The paper actually follows several earlier papers by the authors that I have not read in detail. The notion of single variable transform is to add plus or minus the same random noise to all components of the current value of the Markov chain, instead of the standard d-dimensional random walk proposal of the reference Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, namely all proposals are of the form

x_i'=x_i\pm \epsilon\ i=1,\cdots,d

meaning the chain proceeds [after acceptance] along one and only one of the d diagonals. The authors’ arguments are that (a) the proposal is cheaper and (b) the acceptance rate is higher. What I find questionable in this argument is that this does not directly matter in the evaluation of the performances of the algorithm. For instance, higher acceptance in a Metropolis-Hasting algorithm does not imply faster convergence and smaller asymptotic variance. (This goes without mentioning the fact that the comparative Figure 1 is so variable with the dimension as to be of limited worth. Figure 1 and 2 are also found in an earlier arXived paper of the authors.) For instance, restricting the moves along the diagonals of the Euclidean space implies that there is a positive probability to make two successive proposals along the same diagonal, which is a waste of time. When considering the two-dimensional case, joining two arbitrary points using an everywhere positive density g upon ε means generating two successive values from g, which is equivalent cost-wise to generating a single noise from a two-dimensional proposal. Without the intermediate step of checking the one-dimensional move along one diagonal. So much for a gain. In fine, the proposal found in this paper sums up as being a one-at-a-time version of a standard random walk Metropolis-Hastings algorithm.

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