foxglove summer

Here is the fifth instalment in the Peter Grant (or Rivers of London) series by Ben Aaronovitch. Thus entitled Foxglove summer, which meaning only became clear (to me) by the end of the book. I found it in my mailbox upon arrival in Warwick last Sunday. And rushed through the book during evenings, insomnia breaks and even a few breakfasts!

“It’s observable but not reliably observable. It can have a quantifiable effects, but resists any attempt to apply mathematical principles to it – no wonder Newton kept magic under wraps. It must have driven him mental. Or maybe not.” (p.297)

Either because the author has run out of ideas to centre a fifth novel on a part or aspect of London (even though the parks, including the London Zoo, were not particularly used in the previous novels), or because he could not set this new type of supernatural in a city (no spoilers!), this sequel takes place in the Western Counties, close to the Welsh border (and not so far from Brother Cadfael‘s Shrewbury!). It is also an opportunity to introduce brand new (local) characters which are enjoyable if a wee bit of a caricature! However, the inhabitants of the small village where the kidnapping investigation takes place are almost too sophisticated for Peter Grant who has to handle the enquiry all by himself, as his mentor is immobilised in London by the defection of Peter’s close colleague, Lindsey.

“We trooped off (…) down something that was not so much a path as a statistical variation in the density of the overgrowth.” (p.61)

As usual, the dialogues and monologues of Grant are the most enjoyable part of the story, along with a development of the long-in-the-coming love affair with the river goddess Beverley Brooks. And a much appreciated ambiguity in the attitude of Peter about the runaway Lindsey… The story itself reflects the limitations of a small village where one quickly repeats over and over the same trips and the same relations. Which gives a sensation of slow motion, even in the most exciting moments. The resolution of the enigma is borrowing too heavily to the fae and elves folklore, even though the final pages bring a few surprises. Nonetheless, the whole book was a page-turner for me, meaning I spent more time reading it this week than I intended or than was reasonable. No wonder for a series taking place in The Folly!

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