at CIRM [#2]

Sylvia Richardson gave a great talk yesterday on clustering applied to variable selection, which first raised [in me] a usual worry of the lack of background model for clustering. But the way she used this notion meant there was an infinite Dirichlet process mixture model behind. This is quite novel [at least for me!] in that it addresses the covariates and not the observations themselves. I still wonder at the meaning of the cluster as, if I understood properly, the dependent variable is not involved in the clustering. Check her R package PReMiuM for a practical implementation of the approach. Later, Adeline Samson showed us the results of using pMCM versus particle Gibbs for diffusion processes where (a) pMCMC was behaving much worse than particle Gibbs and (b) EM required very few particles and Metropolis-Hastings steps to achieve convergence, when compared with posterior approximations.

Today Pierre Druilhet explained to the audience of the summer school his measure theoretic approach [I discussed a while ago] to the limit of proper priors via q-vague convergence, with the paradoxical phenomenon that a Be(n⁻¹,n⁻¹) converges to a sum of two Dirac masses when the parameter space is [0,1] but to Haldane’s prior when the space is (0,1)! He also explained why the Jeffreys-Lindley paradox vanishes when considering different measures [with an illustration that came from my Statistica Sinica 1993 paper]. Pierre concluded with the above opposition between two Bayesian paradigms, a [sort of] tale of two sigma [fields]! Not that I necessarily agree with the first paradigm that priors are supposed to have generated the actual parameter. If only because it mechanistically excludes all improper priors…

Darren Wilkinson talked about yeast, which is orders of magnitude more exciting than it sounds, because this is Bayesian big data analysis in action! With significant (and hence impressive) results based on stochastic dynamic models. And massive variable selection techniques. Scala, Haskell, Frege, OCaml were [functional] languages he mentioned that I had never heard of before! And Daniel Rudolf concluded the [intense] second day of this Bayesian week at CIRM with a description of his convergence results for (rather controlled) noisy MCMC algorithms.

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