slice sampling for Dirichlet mixture process

When working with my PhD student Changye in Dauphine this morning I realised that slice sampling also applies to discrete support distributions and could even be of use in such settings. That it works is (now) straightforward in that the missing variable representation behind the slice sampler also applies to densities defined with respect to a discrete measure. That this is useful transpires from the short paper of Stephen Walker (2007) where we saw this, as Stephen relies on the slice sampler to sample from the Dirichlet mixture model by eliminating the tail problem associated with this distribution. (This paper appeared in Communications in Statistics and it is through Pati & Dunson (2014) taking advantage of this trick that Changye found about its very existence. I may have known about it in an earlier life, but I had clearly forgotten everything!)

While the prior distribution (of the weights) of the Dirichlet mixture process is easy to generate via the stick breaking representation, the posterior distribution is trickier as the weights are multiplied by the values of the sampling distribution (likelihood) at the corresponding parameter values and they cannot be normalised. Introducing a uniform to replace all weights in the mixture with an indicator that the uniform is less than those weights corresponds to a (latent variable) completion [or a demarginalisation as we called this trick in Monte Carlo Statistical Methods]. As elaborated in the paper, the Gibbs steps corresponding to this completion are easy to implement, involving only a finite number of components. Meaning the allocation to a component of the mixture can be operated rather efficiently. Or not when considering that the weights in the Dirichlet mixture are not monotone, hence that a large number of them may need to be computed before picking the next index in the mixture when the uniform draw happens to be quite small.

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