Bouncing bouncy particle papers

Yesterday, two papers on bouncy particle samplers simultaneously appeared on arXiv, arxiv:1707.05200 by Chris Sherlock and Alex Thiery, and arxiv:1707.05296 by Paul Vanetti, Alexandre Bouchard-Côté, George Deligiannidis, and Arnaud Doucet. As a coordinated move by both groups of authors who had met the weeks before at the Isaac Newton Institute in Cambridge.

The paper by Sherlock and Thiery, entitled a discrete bouncy particle sampler, considers a delayed rejection approach that only requires point-wise evaluations of the target density. The delay being into making a speed flip move after a proposal involving a flip in the speed and a drift in the variable of interest is rejected. To achieve guaranteed ergodicity, they add a random perturbation as in our recent paper, plus another perturbation based on a Brownian argument. Given that this is a discretised version of the continuous-time bouncy particle sampler, the discretisation step δ need be calibrated. The authors follow a rather circumvoluted argument to argue in favour of seeking a maximum number of reflections (for which I have obviously no intuition). Overall, I find it hard to assess how much of an advance this is, even when simulations support the notion of a geometric convergence.

“Our results provide a cautionary example that in certain high-dimensional scenarios, it is still preferable to perform refreshment even when randomized bounces are used.” Vanetti et al.

The paper by Paul Vanetti and co-authors has a much more ambitious scale in that it unifies most of the work done so far in this area and relates piecewise deterministic processes, Hamiltonian Monte Carlo, and discrete versions, containing on top fine convergence results. The main idea is to improve upon the existing deterministic methods by taking (more) into account the target density. Hence the use of a bouncy particle sampler associated with the Hamiltonian (as in HMC). This borrows from an earlier slice sampler idea of Iain Murray, Ryan Adams, and David McKay (AISTATS 2010), exploiting an exact Hamiltonian dynamics for an approximation to the true target to explore its support. Except that bouncing somewhat avoids the slice step. The [eight] discrete bouncy particle particle samplers derived from this framework are both correct against the targeted distribution and do not require the simulation of event times. The paper distinguishes between global and local versions, the later exploiting conditional independence properties in the (augmented) target. Which sounds like a version of multiple slice sampling.

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