marginal likelihood as exhaustive X validation

In the June issue of Biometrika (for which I am deputy editor) Edwin Fong and Chris Holmes have a short paper (that I did not process!) on the validation of the marginal likelihood as the unique coherent updating rule. Marginal in the general sense of Bissiri et al. (2016). Coherent in the sense of being invariant to the order of input of exchangeable data, if in a somewhat self-defining version (Definition 1). As a consequence, marginal likelihood arises as the unique prequential scoring rule under coherent belief updating in the Bayesian framework. (It is unique given the prior or its generalisation, obviously.)

“…we see that 10% of terms contributing to the marginal likelihood come from out-of-sample predictions, using on average less than 5% of the available training data.”

The paper also contains the interesting remark that the log marginal likelihood is the average leave-p-out X-validation score, across all values of p. Which shows that, provided the marginal can be approximated, the X validation assessment is feasible. Which leads to a highly relevant (imho) spotlight on how this expresses the (deadly) impact of the prior selection on the numerical value of the marginal likelihood. Leaving outsome of the least informative terms in the X-validation leads to exactly the log geometric intrinsic Bayes factor of Berger & Pericchi (1996). Most interesting connection with the Bayes factor community but one that depends on the choice of the dismissed fraction of p‘s.

2 Responses to “marginal likelihood as exhaustive X validation”

  1. Chris Holmes Says:

    Thanks Christian, I’d also recommend Gneiting and Raftery (2007) as essential reading. Sec.7 of G&R formulates a link between marginal-likelihood and cross-validation wrt a uniform random variable motivating a Monte Carlo approximation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.