your GAN is secretly an energy-based model

As I was reading this NeurIPS 2020 paper by Che et al., and trying to make sense of it, I came across a citation to our paper Casella, Robert and Wells (2004) on a generalized accept-reject sampling scheme where the proposal changes at each simulation that sounds surprising if appreciated! But after checking this paper also appears as the first reference on the Wikipedia page for rejection sampling, which makes me wonder if many actually read it. (On the side, we mostly wrote this paper on a drive from Baltimore to Ithaca, after JSM 1999.)

“We provide more evidence that it is beneficial to sample from the energy-based model defined both by the generator and the discriminator instead of from the generator only.”

The paper seems to propose a post-processing of the generator output by a GAN, generating from the mixture of both generator and discriminator, via a (unscented) Langevin algorithm. The core idea is that, if p(.) is the true data generating process, g(.) the estimated generator and d(.) the discriminator, then

p(x) ≈ p⁰(x)∝g(x) exp(d(x))

(The approximation would be exact the discriminator optimal.) The authors work with the latent z’s, in the GAN meaning that generating pseudo-data x from g means taking a deterministic transform of z, x=G(z). When considering the above p⁰, a generation from p⁰ can be seen as accept-reject with acceptance probability proportional to exp[d{G(z)}]. (On the side, Lemma 1 is the standard validation for accept-reject sampling schemes.)

Reading this paper made me realised how much the field had evolved since my previous GAN related read. With directions like Metropolis-Hastings GANs and Wasserstein GANs. (And I noticed a “broader impact” section past the conclusion section about possible misuses with societal consequences, which is a new requirement for NeurIPS publications.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.