Archive for the Linux Category

errno EFBIG

Posted in Books, Kids, Linux, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , on October 12, 2020 by xi'an

ubuntu update

Posted in Linux, pictures with tags , , , , , , , on August 11, 2020 by xi'an


As I had delayed my ugrade of my Ubuntu 16.04 Linux OS way beyond the reasonable, I eventually found myself forced to do it in the least favourable version earlier this week, as the University was closed and my computer support friends were on (well-deserved) vacation. Indeed, my graphical interface went blank and no amount of rebooting was making any change, while I had access to a line editor which was kindly suggesting the command for the upgrade. After a moment of hesitation, I followed the recommendation and prepared for either a long wait or a tragic error message, but nothing like that happened in that the download of the new version was lightning fast and the upgrade itself lasted less than one hour, leaving me with a fully operational 18.04 version. And amazed at recovering my earlier tuning, with even better performances..! (The only glitch is that the colours seem to have turned more reddish or auberginish.) One worry I had with using a Huion graphics tablet [that I had just bought with my amazon credits in preparation for my on-line classes next semester] vanished when I found it had the same minimal performances as earlier [meaning I can write using Gimp, although this app always challenged me, Xournal, which allows for writing on top of my pdf slides, or Microsoft Whiteboard, which works like a potentially infinite whiteboard, but I have no access to the physical control buttons on that tablet]. A happy ending or rather beginning with Bionic Beaver, then, albeit a possibly short one as I should move now to Ubuntu 20.02 version, expecting a similarly smooth transition unless my HP laptop has some compatibility issues

Laplace’s Demon [coming home!]

Posted in Kids, Linux, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 11, 2020 by xi'an

A new online seminar is starting this week, called Laplace’s Demon [after too much immersion in His Dark Materials, lately, ather than Unix coding, I first wrote daemon!] and concerned with Bayesian Machine Learning at Scale. Run by Criteo in Paris (hence the Laplace filiation, I presume!). Here is the motivational blurb from their webpage

Machine learning is changing the world we live in at a break neck pace. From image recognition and generation, to the deployment of recommender systems, it seems to be breaking new ground constantly and influencing almost every aspect of our lives. In this seminar series we ask distinguished speakers to comment on what role Bayesian statistics and Bayesian machine learning have in this rapidly changing landscape. Do we need to optimally process information or borrow strength in the big data era? Are philosophical concepts such as coherence and the likelihood principle relevant when you are running a large scale recommender system? Are variational approximations, MCMC or EP appropriate in a production environment? Can I use the propensity score and call myself a Bayesian? How can I elicit a prior over a massive dataset? Is Bayes a reasonable theory of how to be perfect but a hopeless theory of how to be good? Do we need Bayes when we can just A/B test? What combinations of pragmatism and idealism can be used to deploy Bayesian machine learning in a large scale live system? We ask Bayesian believers, Bayesian pragmatists and Bayesian skeptics to comment on all of these subjects and more.

The seminar takes places on the second Wednesday of the month, at 5pm (GMT+2) starting ill-fatedly with myself on ABC-Gibbs this very Wednesday (13 May 2020), followed by Aki Vehtari, John Ormerod, Nicolas Chopin, François Caron, Pierre Latouche, Victor Elvira, Sara Filippi, and Chris Oates. (I think my very first webinar was a presentation at the Deutsche Bank, New York, I gave from CREST videoconference room from 8pm till midnight after my trip was cancelled when the Twin Towers got destroyed, on 07 September 2001…)

the end of travel?

Posted in Books, Linux, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on June 25, 2017 by xi'an

First came the bad news that travelling [by plane] with any electronic device larger than a small cell phone would be prohibited unless the device was checked in. I first thought this was a sort of weird protectionism for American airlines, since only Middle-East carriers seem to be impacted at the moment, but there are serious hints this could soon be extended to all flights to the USA. And to the UK. And likely to about every flight in a near future. That is fairly annoying and more, not only because it hugely reduces the ability to work on a plane [unless carrying paper printouts of every paper one wanted to read or review during a long flight, until this is as well considered as a fire hazard!], but mostly because quite likely these electronic devices in checked-in bags will be damaged or stolen. So the only convenient [least inconvenient] solution may be to stop travelling with laptops and operate on remote or cheap disposable machines from whenever one is. Since I presume even the smallest PCs like Raspberry Pi’s will be banned at some point. The only good news are for computer companies. And book sellers maybe.On top of this, I learned that the UK has [again!] copied the US in requiring visitors and even its own citizens to open devices to Border or Customs officers. And to disclose social media identities and associated passwords. A British Human Rights activist was recently arrested at London Heathrow for refusing to do so. And I read today that divulging those media IDs are now optional on the visa waiver program and possibly soon to be compulsory. Which sounds insane as a way to fight terrorism as it is obvious to set parallel accounts. And yet another travel nuisance.

At some point in the past, I had mused that we would soon be forced to travel with no personal item, maybe not even our own clothes, but a uniform provided by the airline. With luggages on a drone plane following by a safe margin. The invasion of privacy now contemplated and soon implemented by states that do not any longer seem concerned with Human Right goes way beyond this fantasy scenario. If travelling between countries means a massive reduction of one’s rights and dignity [which is already quite reduced under the current conditions], travelling may soon become a rare occurrence…

the vim cheat sheet

Posted in Kids, Linux, R, University life, Wines with tags , , , on March 18, 2015 by xi'an