Archive for the pictures Category

Suffrage Science awards in maths and computing

Posted in pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 21, 2016 by xi'an

On October 11, at Bletchley Park, the Suffrage Science awards in mathematics and computer sciences were awarded for the first time to 12 senior female researchers. Among whom three statisticians, Professor Christl Donnelly from Imperial College London, my colleague at Warwick, Jane Hutton, and my friend and co-author, Sylvia Richardson, from MRC, Cambridge University. This initiative was started by the Medical Research Council in 2011 by Suffrage Science awards for life sciences, followed in 2013 by one for engineering and physics, and this year for maths and computing. The name of the award aims to connect with the Suffragette movement of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, which were particularly active in Britain. One peculiar aspect of this award is that the recipients are given pieces of jewellery, created for each field, pieces that they will themselves give two years later to a new recipient of their choice, and so on in an infinite regress! (Which suggests a related puzzle, namely to figure out how many years it should take until all female scientists have received the award. But since the number increases as the square of the number of years, this is not going to happen unless the field proves particularly hostile to women scientists!) This jewellery award also relates to the history of the Suffragette movement since the WPSU commissioned their own jewellery awards. A clever additional touch was that the awards were delivered on Ada Lovelace Day, October 11.

David Cox gets the first International Prize in Statistics

Posted in pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on October 20, 2016 by xi'an

Just received an email from the IMS that Sir David Cox (Nuffield College, Oxford) has been awarded the International Prize in Statistics. As discussed earlier on the ‘Og, this prize is intended to act as the equivalent of a Nobel prize for statistics. While I still have reservations about the concept. I have none whatsoever about the nomination as David would have been my suggestion from the start. Congratulations to him for the Prize and more significantly for his massive contributions to statistics, with foundational, methodological and societal impacts! [As Peter Diggle, President of the Royal Statistical Society just pointed out, it is quite fitting that it happens on European Statistics day!]

a grim knight [cont’d]

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, R, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on October 20, 2016 by xi'an

As discussed in the previous entry, there are two interpretations to this question from The Riddler:

“…how long is the longest path a knight can travel on a standard 8-by-8 board without letting the path intersect itself?”

riddlerechckas to what constitutes a path. As a (terrible) chess player, I would opt for the version on the previous post, the knight moving two steps in one direction and one in the other (or vice-versa), thus occupying three squares on the board. But one can consider instead the graph of the moves of that knight, as in the above picture and as in The Riddler. And since I could not let the problem go I also wrote an R code (as clumsy as the previous one!) to explore at random (with some minimal degree of annealing) the maximum length of a self-avoiding knight canter. riddlerechkThe first maximal length I found this way is 32, although I also came by hand to a spiralling solution with a length of 33.

riddlerechckRunning the R code longer over the weekend however led to a path of length 34, while the exact solution to the riddle is 35, as provided by the Riddler (and earlier in many forms, including Martin Gardner’s and Donald Knuth’s).

[An unexpected side-effect of this riddle was ending up watching half of Bergman’s Seventh Seal in Swedish…]

Norman sunrise [jatp]

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel with tags , , , , , on October 16, 2016 by xi'an

Nature highlights

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 16, 2016 by xi'an

Among several interesting (general public) entries and the fascinating article reconstituting the death of Lucy by a fall from a tree, I spotted in the current Sept. 22 issue of Nature two short summaries involving statistical significance, one in linguistics about repeated (and significant) links between some sounds and some concepts (like ‘n’ and ‘nose’) shared between independent languages, another about the (significant) discovery of a π meson and a K meson. The first anonymous editorial, entitled “Algorithm and blues“, was rather gloomy about the impact of proprietary algorithms on our daily life and on our democracies (or what is left of them), like the reliance on such algorithms to grant loan or determining the length of a sentence (based on the estimated probability of re-offending). The article called for more accountability of such tools, from going completely open-source to allowing for some form of strong auditing. This reminded me of the current (regional) debate about the algorithm allocating Greater Paris high school students to local universities and colleges based on their grades, wishes, and available positions. The apparent randomness and arbitrariness of those allocations prompted many (parents) to complain about the algorithm and ask for its move to the open. (Besides the pun in the title, the paper also contained a line about “affirmative algorithmic action”!) There was also a perfectly irrelevant tribune from a representative of the Church of England about its desire to give a higher profile to science in the/their church. Whatever. And I also was bemused by a news article on the difficulty to build a genetic map of Australia Aboriginals due to cultural reticence of Aboriginals to the use of body parts from their communities in genetic research. While I understand and agree with the concept of data privacy, so that to restrain to expose personal information, it is much less clear [to me] why data collected a century ago should come under such protections if it does not create a risk of exposing living individuals. It reminded me of this earlier Nature news article about North-America Aboriginals claiming right to a 8,000 year old skeleton. On a more positive side, this news part also mentioned the first catalogue produced by the Gaia European Space Agency project, from the publication of more than a billion star positions to the open access nature of the database, in that the Gaia team had hardly any prior access to such wealth of data. A special issue part of the journal was dedicated to the impact of social inequalities in the production of (future) scientists, but this sounds rather shallow, at least at the level of the few pages produced on the topic and it did not mention a comparison with other areas of society, where they are also most obviously at work!

Only in Britain…

Posted in Kids, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , on October 15, 2016 by xi'an

A recent announcement on the University of Warwick official website:

Today the Minister for the Constitution, Chris Skidmore, presented WMG, at the University of Warwick, with a Royal Warrant signed by Her Majesty the Queen, officially conferring her Majesty’s recognition with the title of the Regius Professor of Manufacturing (Engineering).

The title of Regius Professorship is a rare and prestigious award given by Her Majesty the Queen to recognise exceptionally high quality research at an institution. The University of Warwick was one of 12 universities honoured to mark Her Majesty’s 90th Birthday. Previous to this, only 14 had been granted since the reign of Queen Victoria. It is believed that the first Regius Professorship was conferred to Aberdeen University in 1497 by King James IV.

grim knight [a riddle]

Posted in Kids, pictures, R with tags , , , on October 14, 2016 by xi'an

The Riddler of this week had a riddle that is a variation of the knight tour problem, namely

“…how long is the longest path a knight can travel on a standard 8-by-8 chessboard without letting the path intersect itself?”

the riddle being then one of a self-avoiding random walk [kind]… As I could not get back to sleep last night, I spent a couple hours (!) on this riddle, programming a random walk [or more accurately, a random canter]. This is a brute-force approach in that I pick any acceptable move with the same probability and stop when there is no further move available. [The title refers to the recommendation to avoid the rim of the chessboard with a knight: “a knight on the rim is grim”…]

while (stop){

with my function nexx a rather clumsy 50 lines business of selecting one acceptable move from the current position curr. This function returns the proposed move as well as the updated board with zeros in squares already visited by the knight. Which highlights the ambiguity in the question, namely how one defines the path of a knight? For an acceptable knight move from A to B, there are two possible paths: either take two steps in one direction and one in the orthogonal direction or the opposite. I thus pick one of the two (at random) and prohibit further visits to those squares. An alternative meaning of the question could be that the line joining A to B cannot be crossed ever again, which excludes less moves (but is more cumbersome to code). Anyway, with the former interpretation of a path, repeating the self-avoiding moves led to a maximum of 19 moves, with one solution exhibited below. (Since (64-1)/3=21, it is conceivable that the true maximum is 20 or even 21. In the path representation below, it seems possible to include yet another move by going to (4,1) instead of (4,5). But this is apparently excluded by the square representation on the right. Why is why the path representation is somewhat confusing!)


Today, namely on October 15, I received a solution of length 21, hence covering the entire board without ever using the same square twice. It was sent to me by Paul-Henry Cournède (a geographical neighbour!) and is “obvious” once you see it. Which may be why the alternative interpretation of “path” was chosen in The Riddler. And why my rhs representation is clearly misleading!