Archive for the Travel Category

snapshot from Montpellier

Posted in Books, pictures, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , on July 5, 2015 by xi'an

comedie

Bayesian statistics from methods to models and applications

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , on July 5, 2015 by xi'an

A Springer book published in conjunction with the great BAYSM 2014 conference in Wien last year has now appeared. Here is the table of contents:

  • Bayesian Survival Model Based on Moment Characterization by Arbel, Julyan et al.
  • A New Finite Approximation for the NGG Mixture Model: An Application to Density Estimation by Bianchini, Ilaria
  • Distributed Estimation of Mixture Model by Dedecius, Kamil et al.
  • Jeffreys’ Priors for Mixture Estimation by Grazian, Clara and X
  • A Subordinated Stochastic Process Model by Palacios, Ana Paula et al.
  • Bayesian Variable Selection for Generalized Linear Models Using the Power-Conditional-Expected-Posterior Prior by Perrakis, Konstantinos et al.
  • Application of Interweaving in DLMs to an Exchange and Specialization Experiment by Simpson, Matthew
  • On Bayesian Based Adaptive Confidence Sets for Linear Functionals by Szabó, Botond
  • Identifying the Infectious Period Distribution for Stochastic Epidemic Models Using the Posterior Predictive Check by Alharthi, Muteb et al.
  • A New Strategy for Testing Cosmology with Simulations by Killedar, Madhura et al.
  • Formal and Heuristic Model Averaging Methods for Predicting the US Unemployment Rate by Kolly, Jeremy
  • Bayesian Estimation of the Aortic Stiffness based on Non-invasive Computed Tomography Images by Lanzarone, Ettore et al.
  • Bayesian Filtering for Thermal Conductivity Estimation Given Temperature Observations by Martín-Fernández, Laura et al.
  • A Mixture Model for Filtering Firms’ Profit Rates by Scharfenaker, Ellis et al.

Enjoy!

snapshot from Boston [guest shot]

Posted in pictures, Travel with tags , , , , on July 4, 2015 by xi'an

boston

the (expected) demise of the Bayes factor [#2]

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 1, 2015 by xi'an

AmsterXXFollowing my earlier comments on Alexander Ly, Josine Verhagen, and Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, from Amsterdam, Joris Mulder, a special issue editor of the Journal of Mathematical Psychology, kindly asked me for a written discussion of that paper, discussion that I wrote last week and arXived this weekend. Besides the above comments on ToP, this discussion contains some of my usual arguments against the use of the Bayes factor as well as a short introduction to our recent proposal via mixtures. Short introduction as I had to restrain myself from reproducing the arguments in the original paper, for fear it would jeopardize its chances of getting published and, who knows?, discussed.

life and death along the RER B, minus approximations

Posted in Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 30, 2015 by xi'an

viemortrerbWhile cooking for a late Sunday lunch today [sweet-potatoes röstis], I was listening as usual to the French Public Radio (France Inter) and at some point heard the short [10mn] Périphéries that gives every weekend an insight on the suburbs [on the “other side’ of the Parisian Périphérique boulevard]. The idea proposed by a geographer from Montpellier, Emmanuel Vigneron, was to point out the health inequalities between the wealthy 5th arrondissement of Paris and the not-so-far-away suburbs, by following the RER B train line from Luxembourg to La Plaine-Stade de France…

The disparities between the heart of Paris and some suburbs are numerous and massive, actually the more one gets away from the lifeline represented by the RER A and RER B train lines, so far from me the idea of negating this opposition, but the presentation made during those 10 minutes of Périphéries was quite approximative in statistical terms. For instance, the mortality rate in La Plaine is 30% higher than the mortality rate in Luxembourg and this was translated into the chances for a given individual from La Plaine to die in the coming year are 30% higher than if he [or she] lives in Luxembourg. Then a few minutes later the chances for a given individual from Luxembourg to die are 30% lower than he [or she] lives in La Plaine…. Reading from the above map, it appears that the reference is the mortality rate for the Greater Paris. (Those are 2010 figures.) This opposition that Vigneron attributes to a different access to health facilities, like the number of medical general practitioners per inhabitant, does not account for the huge socio-demographic differences between both places, for instance the much younger and maybe larger population in suburbs like La Plaine. And for other confounding factors: see, e.g., the equally large difference between the neighbouring stations of Luxembourg and Saint-Michel. There is no socio-demographic difference and the accessibility of health services is about the same. Or the similar opposition between the southern suburban stops of Bagneux and [my local] Bourg-la-Reine, with the same access to health services… Or yet again the massive decrease in the Yvette valley near Orsay. The analysis is thus statistically poor and somewhat ideologically biased in that I am unsure the data discussed during this radio show tells us much more than the sad fact that suburbs with less favoured populations show a higher mortality rate.

art brut

Posted in pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , on June 28, 2015 by xi'an

tantan

the girl who saved the king of Sweden [book review]

Posted in Books, Kids, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 27, 2015 by xi'an

When visiting a bookstore in Florence last month, during our short trip to Tuscany, I came upon this book with enough of a funny cover and enough of a funny title (possibly capitalising on the similarity with “the girl who played with fire”] to make me buy it. I am glad I gave in to this impulse as the book is simply hilarious! The style and narrative relate rather strongly to the series of similarly [mostly] hilarious picaresque tales written by Paasilina and not only because both authors are from Scandinavia. There is the same absurd feeling that the book characters should not have this sort of things happening to them and still the morbid fascination to watch catastrophe after catastrophe being piled upon them. While the story is deeply embedded within the recent history of South Africa and [not so much] of Sweden for the past 30 years, including major political figures, there is no true attempt at making the story in the least realistic, which is another characteristic of the best stories of Paasilina. Here, a young girl escapes the poverty of the slums of Soweto, to eventually make her way to Sweden along with a spare nuclear bomb and a fistful of diamonds. Which alas are not eternal… Her intelligence helps her to overcome most difficulties, but even her needs from time to time to face absurd situations as another victim. All is well that ends well for most characters in the story, some of whom one would prefer to vanish in a gruesome accident. Which seemed to happen until another thread in the story saved the idiot. The satire of South Africa and of Sweden is most enjoyable if somewhat easy! Now I have to read the previous volume in the series, The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared!

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