Archive for the University life Category

ratio-of-uniforms [#4]

Posted in Books, pictures, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on December 2, 2016 by xi'an

Possibly the last post on random number generation by Kinderman and Monahan’s (1977) ratio-of-uniform method. After fiddling with the Gamma(a,1) distribution when a<1 for a while, I indeed figured out a way to produce a bounded set with this method: considering an arbitrary cdf Φ with corresponding pdf φ, the uniform distribution on the set Λ of (u,v)’s in R⁺xX such that

0≤u≤Φοƒ[φοΦ⁻¹(u)v]

induces the distribution with density proportional to ƒ on φοΦ⁻¹(U)V. This set Λ has a boundary that is parameterised as

u=Φοƒ(x),  v=1/φοƒ(x), x∈Χ

which remains bounded in u since Φ is a cdf and in v if φ has fat enough tails. At both 0 and ∞. When ƒ is the Gamma(a,1) density this can be achieved if φ behaves like log(x)² near zero and like a inverse power at infinity. Without getting into all the gory details, closed form density φ and cdf Φ can be constructed for all a’s, as shown for a=½ by the boundaries in u and v (yellow) below

bundawhich leads to a bounded associated set Λ

ratgamp5At this stage, I remain uncertain of the relevance of such derivations, if only because the set A thus derived is ill-suited for uniform draws proposed on the enclosing square box. And also because a Gamma(a,1) simulation can rather simply be derived from a Gamma(a+1,1) simulation. But, who knows?!, there may be alternative usages of this representation, such as innovative slice samplers. Which means the ratio-of-uniform method may reappear on the ‘Og one of those days…

“Stein deviates from the statistical norm”

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on November 27, 2016 by xi'an

steinap

Charles M. Stein [1920-2016]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 26, 2016 by xi'an

I have just heard that Charles Stein, Professor at Stanford University, passed away last night. Although the following image is definitely over-used, I truly feel this is the departure of a giant of statistics.  He has been deeply influential on the fields of probability and mathematical statistics, primarily in decision theory and approximation techniques. On the first field, he led to considerable changes in the perception of optimality by exhibiting the Stein phenomenon, where the aggregation of several admissible estimators of unrelated quantities may (and will) become inadmissible for the joint estimation of those quantities! Although the result can be explained by mathematical and statistical reasoning, it was still dubbed a paradox due to its counter-intuitive nature. More foundationally, it led to expose the ill-posed nature of frequentist optimality criteria and certainly contributed to the Bayesian renewal of the 1980’s, before the MCMC revolution. (It definitely contributed to my own move, as I started working on the Stein phenomenon during my thesis, before realising the fundamentally Bayesian nature of the domination results.)

“…the Bayesian point of view is often accompanied by an insistence that people ought to agree to a certain doctrine even without really knowing what this doctrine is.” (Statistical Science, 1986)

The second major contribution of Charles Stein was the introduction of a new technique for normal approximation that is now called the Stein method. It relies on a differential operator and produces estimates of approximation error in Central Limit theorems, even in dependent settings. While I am much less familiar with this aspect of Charles Stein’s work, I believe the impact it has had on the field is much more profound and durable than the Stein effect in Normal mean estimation.

(During the Vietnam War, he was quite active in the anti-war movement and the above picture from 2003 shows that his opinions had not shifted over time!) A giant truly has gone.

rare events for ABC

Posted in Books, Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on November 24, 2016 by xi'an

Dennis Prangle, Richard G. Everitt and Theodore Kypraios just arXived a new paper on ABC, aiming at handling high dimensional data with latent variables, thanks to a cascading (or nested) approximation of the probability of a near coincidence between the observed data and the ABC simulated data. The approach amalgamates a rare event simulation method based on SMC, pseudo-marginal Metropolis-Hastings and of course ABC. The rare event is the near coincidence of the observed summary and of a simulated summary. This is so rare that regular ABC is forced to accept not so near coincidences. Especially as the dimension increases.  I mentioned nested above purposedly because I find that the rare event simulation method of Cérou et al. (2012) has a nested sampling flavour, in that each move of the particle system (in the sample space) is done according to a constrained MCMC move. Constraint derived from the distance between observed and simulated samples. Finding an efficient move of that kind may prove difficult or impossible. The authors opt for a slice sampler, proposed by Murray and Graham (2016), however they assume that the distribution of the latent variables is uniform over a unit hypercube, an assumption I do not fully understand. For the pseudo-marginal aspect, note that while the approach produces a better and faster evaluation of the likelihood, it remains an ABC likelihood and not the original likelihood. Because the estimate of the ABC likelihood is monotonic in the number of terms, a proposal can be terminated earlier without inducing a bias in the method.

Lake Louise, Banff National Park, March 21, 2012This is certainly an innovative approach of clear interest and I hope we will discuss it at length at our BIRS ABC 15w5025 workshop next February. At this stage of light reading, I am slightly overwhelmed by the combination of so many computational techniques altogether towards a single algorithm. The authors argue there is very little calibration involved, but so many steps have to depend on as many configuration choices.

Monty Python generator

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on November 23, 2016 by xi'an

By some piece of luck I came across a paper by the late George Marsaglia, genial contributor to the field of simulation, and Wai Wan Tang, entitled The Monty Python method for generating random variables. As shown by the below illustration, the concept is to flip the piece H outside the rectangle back inside the rectangle, exploiting the remaining area above the density. The fantastic part is actually that “since areas of the rectangle add to 1, the slim in-between area is exactly the tail area”! So the tiny bit between G and the flipped H is the remaining tail.montepythonIn the case of a Gamma Ga(a,1) variate, the authors express this variate as the transform of another variate with a nearly symmetry density, on which the Monty Python method applies. The transform is

q(x)=(a-1/3)(1 + x/\sqrt{16a})^3

with -√16a<x. The second nice trick is that the density of x is provided for free by the Gamma Ga(a,1) density and the transform, thanks to the change of variable formula. One lingering question is obviously how to handle the tail part. This is handled separately in the paper, with a rather involved algorithm, but since the area of the tail is tiny, a mere 1.2% in the case of the Gaussian density, this instance occurs rarely. Very clever if highly specialised! (The case of a<1 has to be processed by the indirect of multiplying a Ga(a+1,1) by a uniform variate to the power 1/a.)

I also found out that there exists a Monte Python software, which is an unrelated Monte Carlo code in python [hence the name] for cosmological inference. Including nested sampling, unsurprisingly.

seven permanent positions at Warwick!

Posted in pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on November 22, 2016 by xi'an

sunrise on the road to Kenilworth, May 7, 2014Seven academic positions in Statistics are currently opening at the University of Warwick! They correspond to the following levels, all permanent but for the Harrison Early-Career Assistant Professorship:

• Harrison Early-Career Assistant Professor of Statistics (3 years)
• Assistant Professor of Statistics
• Senior Teaching Fellow in Statistics
• Assistant or Associate Professor of Financial Mathematics
• Assistant or Associate Professor of Statistics (two positions)
• Full Professor of Statistics

Applicants are sought with expertise in Statistics (in the wide sense, including both applied and methodological statistics, probability, probabilistic operational research and mathematical finance together with interdisciplinary topics involving one or more of these areas). Applicants for senior positions should have an excellent publication record and ability to secure research funding. Applicants for more junior positions should show exceptional promise to become leading academics. [More details.]

Informal enquires should be addressed to any of Professors Mark Steel, David Hobson, Gareth Roberts, Wilfrid Kendall, or to any other senior member of the Department. Including me. The closing date is 3 January 2017 for all positions, except for the Full Professor position which is set to 10 January 2017.

As a completely objective observer (!), I can state that this is a fantastic department, with a strong sense of community and support among the faculty, and a tremendously diverse array of research activities and topics. And thus encourage anyone interested in joining to apply for some of those positions!

simulation under zero measure constraints [a reply]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on November 21, 2016 by xi'an

grahamFollowing my post of last Friday on simulating over zero measure sets, as, e.g., producing a sample with a given maximum likelihood estimator, Dennis Prangle pointed out the recent paper on the topic by Graham and Storkey, and a wee bit later, Matt Graham himself wrote an answer to my X Validated question detailing the resolution of the MLE problem for a Student’s t sample. Including the undoubtedly awesome picture of a 3 observation sample distribution over a non-linear manifold in R³. When reading this description I was then reminded of a discussion I had a few months ago with Gabriel Stolz about his free energy approach that managed the same goal through a Langevin process. Including the book Free Energy Computations he wrote in 2010 with Tony Lelièvre and Mathias Rousset. I now have to dig deeper in these papers, but in the meanwhile let me point out that there is a bounty of 200 points running on this X Validated question for another three days. Offered by Glen B., the #1 contributor to X Validated question for all times.