Archive for ABC

learning optimal summary statistics

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 27, 2022 by xi'an

Despite the pursuit of the holy grail of sufficient statistics, most applications will have to settle for the weakest concept of optimal statistics.”Quiz #1: How does Bayes sufficiency [which preserves the posterior density] differ from sufficiency [which preserves the likelihood function]?

Quiz #2: How does Fisher-information sufficiency [which preserves the information matrix] differ from standard sufficiency [which preserves the likelihood function]?

Read a recent arXival by Till Hoffmann and Jukka-Pekka Onnela that I frankly found most puzzling… Maybe due to the Norman train where I was traveling being particularly noisy.

The argument in the paper is to find a summary statistic that minimises the [empirical] expected posterior entropy, which equivalently means minimising the expected Kullback-Leibler distance to the full posterior.  And maximizing the mutual information between parameters θ and summaries t(.). And maximizing the expected surprise. Which obviously requires breaking the sample into iid components and hence considering the gain brought by a specific transform of a single observation. The paper also contains a long comparison with other criteria for choosing summaries.

“Minimizing the posterior entropy would discard the sufficient statistic t such that the posterior is equal to the prior–we have not learned anything from the data.”

Furthermore, the expected aspect of the criterion takes us away from a proper Bayes analysis (and exhibits artifacts as the one above), which somehow makes me question the relevance of comparing entropies under different distributions. It took me a long while to realise that the collection of summaries was set by the user and quite limited. Like a neural network representation of the posterior mean. And the intractable posterior is further approximated by a closed-form function of the parameter θ and of the summary t(.). Using there a neural density estimator. Or a mixture density network.

potato tomato [w/o ABC]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , on July 8, 2022 by xi'an

“The default parameter of KaKs_Calculator was set to estimate the Ka/Ks values, which means that the Ka/Ks value was the average of the output from 15 available algorithms comprising 7 original approximate methods and one maximum likelihood method.”

In their analysis of the philogenic evolution of the potato species, the Nature authors resort to a multiple analysis (à la EJ!) in the above sense, by averaging several results. I remain puzzled by the approach that treats all methods on an equal basis, without trying to ascertain precision and bias by X validation or other tools. (Approximate Bayesian Computing was not used as one of the methods.)

day two at ISBA 22

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 30, 2022 by xi'an

Still woke up early too early, which let me go for a long run in Mont Royal (which felt almost immediately familiar from earlier runs at MCM 2017!) at dawn and at a pleasant temperature (but missed the top bagel bakery on the way back!). Skipped the morning plenary lectures to complete recommendation letters and finishing a paper submission. But had a terrific lunch with a good friend I had not seen in Covid-times, at a local branch of Kinton Ramen which I already enjoyed in Vancouver as my Airbnb was located on top of it.

I chaired the afternoon Bayesian computations session with Onur Teymur presenting the general spirit of his Neurips 21 paper on black box probabilistic numerics. Mentioning that a new textbook on the topic by Phillip Henning, Michael Osborne, and Hans Kersting had appeared today! The second talk was by Laura Bondi who discussed an ABC model choice approach to assess breast cancer screening. With enough missing data (out of 78051 women followed over 12 years) to lead to an intractable likelihood. Starting with vanilla ABC using 32 summaries and moving to our random forest approach. Unsurprisingly concluding with different top models, but not characterising the identifiability provided by the choice of the summaries. The third talk was by Ryan Chan (fresh Warwick PhD recipient), about a Fusion divide-and-conquer approach that avoids the approximation of earlier approaches. In particular he uses a clever accept-reject algorithm to generate a product of densities using the component densities. A nice trick that Murray explained to me while visiting in Paris lg ast month. (The approach appears to be parameterisation dependent.) The final talk was by Umberto Picchini and in a sort the synthetic likelihood mirror of Massi’s talk yesterday, in the sense of constructing a guided proposal relying on observed summaries. If not comparing both approaches on a given toy like the g-and-k distribution.

day one at ISBA 22

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 29, 2022 by xi'an

Started the day with a much appreciated swimming practice in the [alas warm⁺⁺⁺] outdoor 50m pool on the Island with no one but me in the slooow lane. And had my first ride with the biXi system, surprised at having to queue behind other bikes at red lights! More significantly, it was a great feeling to reunite at last with so many friends I had not met for more than two years!!!

My friend Adrian Raftery gave the very first plenary lecture on his work on the Bayesian approach to long-term population projections, which was recently  a work censored by some US States, then counter-censored by the Supreme Court [too busy to kill Roe v. Wade!]. Great to see the use of Bayesian methods validated by the UN Population Division [with at least one branch of the UN

Stephen Lauritzen returning to de Finetti notion of a model as something not real or true at all, back to exchangeability. Making me wonder when exchangeability is more than a convenient assumption leading to the Hewitt-Savage theorem. And sufficiency. I mean, without falling into a Keynesian fallacy, each point of the sample has unique specificities that cannot be taken into account in an exchangeable model. Nice to hear some measure theory, though!!! Plus a comment on the median never being sufficient, recouping an older (and presumably not original) point of mine. Stephen’s (or Fisher’s?) argument being that the median cannot be recursively computed!

Antonietta Mira and I had our ABC session this afternoon with Cecilia Viscardi, Sirio Legramanti, and Massimiliano Tamborino (Warwick) as speakers. Cecilia linked ABC with normalising flows, in collaboration with Dennis Prangle (whose earlier paper on this connection was presented as the first One World ABC seminar). Thus using past simulations to approximate the posterior by a neural network, possibly with a significant increase in computing time when compared with more rudimentary SMC-ABC methods in larger dimensions. Sirio considered summary-free ABC based on discrepancies like Rademacher complexity. Which more or less contains MMD, Kullback-Leibler, Wasserstein and more, although it seems to be dependent on the parameterisation of the observations. An interesting opening at the end was that this approach could apply to non iid settings. Massi presented a paper coauthored with Umberto that had just been arXived. On sequential ABC with a dependence on the summary statistic (hence guided). Further bringing copulas into the game, although this forces another choice [for the marginals] in the method.

Tamara Broderick talked about a puzzling leverage effect of some observations in economic studies where a tiny portion of individuals may modify the significance or the sign of a coefficient, for which I cannot tell whether the data or the reliance on statistical significance are to blame. Robert Kohn presented mixture-of-Gaussian copulas [not to be confused with mixture of Gaussian-copulas!] and Nancy Reid concluded my first [and somewhat exhausting!] day at ISBA with a BFF talk on the different statistical paradigms take on confidence (for which the notion of calibration seems to remain frequentist).

Side comments: First, most people in the conference are wearing masks, which is great! Also, I find it hard to read slides from the screen, which I presume is an age issue (?!) Even more aside, I had Korean lunch in a place that refused to serve me a glass of water, which I find amazing.

nonparametric ABC [seminar]

Posted in pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2022 by xi'an

Puzzle: How do you run ABC when you mistrust the model?! We somewhat considered this question in our misspecified ABC paper with David and Judith. An AISTATS 2022 paper by Harita Dellaporta (Warwick), Jeremias KnoblauchTheodoros Damoulas (Warwick), and François-Xavier Briol (formerly Warwick) is addressing this same question and Harita presented the paper at the One World ABC webinar yesterday.

It is inspired from Lyddon, Walker & Holmes (2018), who place a nonparametric prior on the generating model, in top of the assumed parametric model (with an intractable likelihood). This induces a push-forward prior on the pseudo-true parameter, that is, the value that brings the parametric family the closest possible to the true distribution of the data. Here defined as a minimum distance parameter, the maximum mean discrepancy (MMD). Choosing RKHS framework allows for a practical implementation, resorting to simulations for posterior realisations from a Dirichlet posterior and from the parametric model, and stochastic gradient for computing the pseudo-true parameter, which may prove somewhat heavy in terms of computing cost.

The paper also containts a consistency result in an ε-contaminated setting (contamination of the assumed parametric family). Comparisons like the above with a fully parametric Wasserstein-ABC approach show that this alter resists better misspecification, as could be expected since the later is not constructed for that purpose.

Next talk is on 23 June by Cosma Shalizi.

%d bloggers like this: