Archive for arXiv

approximate likelihood

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , on September 6, 2017 by xi'an

Today, I read a newly arXived paper by Stephen Gratton on a method called GLASS for General Likelihood Approximate Solution Scheme… The starting point is the same as with ABC or synthetic likelihood, namely a collection of summary statistics and an intractable likelihood. The author proposes to use as a substitute a maximum entropy solution based on these summary statistics and their assumed moments under the theoretical model. What is quite unclear in the paper is whether or not these assumed moments are available in closed form or not. Otherwise, it would appear as a variant to the synthetic likelihood [aka simulated moments] approach, meaning that the expectations of the summary statistics under the theoretical model and for a given value of the parameter are obtained through Monte Carlo approximations. (All the examples therein allow for closed form expressions.)

Bouncing bouncy particle papers

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on July 27, 2017 by xi'an

Yesterday, two papers on bouncy particle samplers simultaneously appeared on arXiv, arxiv:1707.05200 by Chris Sherlock and Alex Thiery, and arxiv:1707.05296 by Paul Vanetti, Alexandre Bouchard-Côté, George Deligiannidis, and Arnaud Doucet. As a coordinated move by both groups of authors who had met the weeks before at the Isaac Newton Institute in Cambridge.

The paper by Sherlock and Thiery, entitled a discrete bouncy particle sampler, considers a delayed rejection approach that only requires point-wise evaluations of the target density. The delay being into making a speed flip move after a proposal involving a flip in the speed and a drift in the variable of interest is rejected. To achieve guaranteed ergodicity, they add a random perturbation as in our recent paper, plus another perturbation based on a Brownian argument. Given that this is a discretised version of the continuous-time bouncy particle sampler, the discretisation step δ need be calibrated. The authors follow a rather circumvoluted argument to argue in favour of seeking a maximum number of reflections (for which I have obviously no intuition). Overall, I find it hard to assess how much of an advance this is, even when simulations support the notion of a geometric convergence.

“Our results provide a cautionary example that in certain high-dimensional scenarios, it is still preferable to perform refreshment even when randomized bounces are used.” Vanetti et al.

The paper by Paul Vanetti and co-authors has a much more ambitious scale in that it unifies most of the work done so far in this area and relates piecewise deterministic processes, Hamiltonian Monte Carlo, and discrete versions, containing on top fine convergence results. The main idea is to improve upon the existing deterministic methods by taking (more) into account the target density. Hence the use of a bouncy particle sampler associated with the Hamiltonian (as in HMC). This borrows from an earlier slice sampler idea of Iain Murray, Ryan Adams, and David McKay (AISTATS 2010), exploiting an exact Hamiltonian dynamics for an approximation to the true target to explore its support. Except that bouncing somewhat avoids the slice step. The [eight] discrete bouncy particle particle samplers derived from this framework are both correct against the targeted distribution and do not require the simulation of event times. The paper distinguishes between global and local versions, the later exploiting conditional independence properties in the (augmented) target. Which sounds like a version of multiple slice sampling.

fast ε-free ABC

Posted in Books, Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 8, 2017 by xi'an

Last Fall, George Papamakarios and Iain Murray from Edinburgh arXived an ABC paper on fast ε-free inference on simulation models with Bayesian conditional density estimation, paper that I missed. The idea there is to approximate the posterior density by maximising the likelihood associated with a parameterised family of distributions on θ, conditional on the associated x. The data being then the ABC reference table. The family chosen there is a mixture of K Gaussian components, which parameters are then estimated by a (Bayesian) neural network using x as input and θ as output. The parameter values are simulated from an adaptive proposal that aims at approximating the posterior better and better. As in population Monte Carlo, actually. Except for the neural network part, which I fail to understand why it makes a significant improvement when compared with EM solutions. The overall difficulty with this approach is that I do not see a way out of the curse of dimensionality: when the dimension of θ increases, the approximation to the posterior distribution of θ does deteriorate, even in the best of cases, as any other non-parametric resolution. It would have been of (further) interest to see a comparison with a most rudimentary approach, namely the one we proposed based on empirical likelihoods.

peer community in evolutionary biology

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on May 18, 2017 by xi'an

My friends (and co-authors) from Montpellier pointed out the existence of PCI Evolutionary Biology, which is a preprint and postprint validation forum [so far only] in the field of Evolutionary Biology. Authors of a preprint or of a published paper request a recommendation from the forum. If someone from the board finds the paper of interest, this person initiates a quick refereeing process with one or two referees and returns a review to the authors, with possible requests for modification, and if the lead reviewer is happy with the new version, the link to the paper and the reviews are published on PCI Evol Biol, which thus gives a stamp of validation to the contents in the paper. The paper can then be submitted for publication in any journal, as can be seen from the papers in the list.

This sounds like a great initiative and since PCI is calling for little brothers and sisters to PCI Evol Biol, I think we should try to build its equivalent in Statistics or maybe just Computational Statistics.

the invasion of the stochastic gradients

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 10, 2017 by xi'an

Within the same day, I spotted three submissions to arXiv involving stochastic gradient descent, that I briefly browsed on my trip back from Wales:

  1. Stochastic Gradient Descent as Approximate Bayesian inference, by Mandt, Hoffman, and Blei, where this technique is used as a type of variational Bayes method, where the minimum Kullback-Leibler distance to the true posterior can be achieved. Rephrasing the [scalable] MCMC algorithm of Welling and Teh (2011) as such an approximation.
  2. Further and stronger analogy between sampling and optimization: Langevin Monte Carlo and gradient descent, by Arnak Dalalyan, which establishes a convergence of the uncorrected Langevin algorithm to the right target distribution in the sense of the Wasserstein distance. (Uncorrected in the sense that there is no Metropolis step, meaning this is a Euler approximation.) With an extension to the noisy version, when the gradient is approximated eg by subsampling. The connection with stochastic gradient descent is thus tenuous, but Arnak explains the somewhat disappointing rate of convergence as being in agreement with optimisation rates.
  3. Stein variational adaptive importance sampling, by Jun Han and Qiang Liu, which relates to our population Monte Carlo algorithm, but as a non-parametric version, using RKHS to represent the transforms of the particles at each iteration. The sampling method follows two threads of particles, one that is used to estimate the transform by a stochastic gradient update, and another one that is used for estimation purposes as in a regular population Monte Carlo approach. Deconstructing into those threads allows for conditional independence that makes convergence easier to establish. (A problem we also hit when working on the AMIS algorithm.)

marginal likelihoods from MCMC

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 26, 2017 by xi'an

A new arXiv entry on ways to approximate marginal likelihoods based on MCMC output, by astronomers (apparently). With an application to the 2015 Planck satellite analysis of cosmic microwave background radiation data, which reminded me of our joint work with the cosmologists of the Paris Institut d’Astrophysique ten years ago. In the literature review, the authors miss several surveys on the approximation of those marginals, including our San Antonio chapter, on Bayes factors approximations, but mention our ABC survey somewhat inappropriately since it is not advocating the use of ABC for such a purpose. (They mention as well variational Bayes approximations, INLA, powered likelihoods, if not nested sampling.)

The proposal of this paper is to identify the marginal m [actually denoted a there] as the normalising constant of an unnormalised posterior density. And to do so the authors estimate the posterior by a non-parametric approach, namely a k-nearest-neighbour estimate. With the additional twist of producing a sort of Bayesian posterior on the constant m. [And the unusual notion of number density, used for the unnormalised posterior.] The Bayesian estimation of m relies on a Poisson sampling assumption on the k-nearest neighbour distribution. (Sort of, since k is actually fixed, not random.)

If the above sounds confusing and imprecise it is because I am myself rather mystified by the whole approach and find it difficult to see the point in this alternative. The Bayesian numerics does not seem to have other purposes than producing a MAP estimate. And using a non-parametric density estimate opens a Pandora box of difficulties, the most obvious one being the curse of dimension(ality). This reminded me of the commented paper of Delyon and Portier where they achieve super-efficient convergence when using a kernel estimator, but with a considerable cost and a similar sensitivity to dimension.

John Kruschke on Bayesian assessment of null values

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2017 by xi'an

John Kruschke pointed out to me a blog entry he wrote last December as a follow-up to my own entry on an earlier paper of his. Induced by an X validated entry. Just in case this sounds a wee bit too convoluted for unraveling the threads (!), the central notion there is to replace a point null hypothesis testing [of bad reputation, for many good reasons] with a check whether or not the null value stands within the 95% HPD region [modulo a buffer zone], which offers the pluses of avoiding a Dirac mass at the null value and a long-term impact of the prior tails on the decision, as well as the possibility of a no-decision, with the minuses of replacing the null with a tolerance region around the null and calibrating both the rejection level and the buffer zone. The December blog entry exposes this principle with graphical illustrations familiar to readers of Doing Bayesian Data Analysis.

As I do not want to fall into an infinite regress of mirror discussions, I will not proceed further than referring to my earlier post, which covers my reservations about the proposal. But interested readers may want to check the latest paper by Kruschke and Liddel on that perspective. (With the conclusion that “Bayesian estimation does everything the New Statistics desires, better”.) Available on PsyArXiv, an avatar of arXiv for psychology papers.