Archive for Bayesian variable selection

a case for Bayesian deep learnin

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 30, 2020 by xi'an

Andrew Wilson wrote a piece about Bayesian deep learning last winter. Which I just read. It starts with the (posterior) predictive distribution being the core of Bayesian model evaluation or of model (epistemic) uncertainty.

“On the other hand, a flat prior may have a major effect on marginalization.”

Interesting sentence, as, from my viewpoint, using a flat prior is a no-no when running model evaluation since the marginal likelihood (or evidence) is no longer a probability density. (Check Lindley-Jeffreys’ paradox in this tribune.) The author then goes for an argument in favour of a Bayesian approach to deep neural networks for the reason that data cannot be informative on every parameter in the network, which should then be integrated out wrt a prior. He also draws a parallel between deep ensemble learning, where random initialisations produce different fits, with posterior distributions, although the equivalent to the prior distribution in an optimisation exercise is somewhat vague.

“…we do not need samples from a posterior, or even a faithful approximation to the posterior. We need to evaluate the posterior in places that will make the greatest contributions to the [posterior predictive].”

The paper also contains an interesting point distinguishing between priors over parameters and priors over functions, ony the later mattering for prediction. Which must be structured enough to compensate for the lack of data information about most aspects of the functions. The paper further discusses uninformative priors (over the parameters) in the O’Bayes sense as a default way to select priors. It is however unclear to me how this discussion accounts for the problems met in high dimensions by standard uninformative solutions. More aggressively penalising priors may be needed, as those found in high dimension variable selection. As in e.g. the 10⁷ dimensional space mentioned in the paper. Interesting read all in all!

BayesComp’20

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 10, 2020 by xi'an

First, I really have to congratulate my friend Jim Hobert for a great organisation of the meeting adopting my favourite minimalist principles (no name tag, no “goodies” apart from the conference schedule, no official talks). Without any pretense at objectivity, I also appreciated very much the range of topics and the sweet frustration of having to choose between two or three sessions each time. Here are some notes taken during some talks (with no implicit implication for the talks no mentioned, re. above frustration! as well as very short nights making sudden lapse in concentration highly likely).

On Day 1, Paul Fearnhead’s inaugural plenary talk was on continuous time Monte Carlo methods, mostly bouncy particle and zig-zag samplers, with a detailed explanation on the simulation of the switching times which likely brought the audience up to speed even if they had never heard of them. And an opening on PDMPs used as equivalents to reversible jump MCMC, reminding me of the continuous time (point process) solutions of Matthew Stephens for mixture inference (and of Preston, Ripley, Møller).

The same morn I heard of highly efficient techniques to handle very large matrices and p>n variables selections by Akihiko Nishimura and Ruth Baker on a delayed acceptance ABC, using a cheap proxy model. Somewhat different from indirect inference. I found the reliance on ESS somewhat puzzling given the intractability of the likelihood (and the low reliability of the frequency estimate) and the lack of connection with the “real” posterior. At the same ABC session, Umberto Picchini spoke on a joint work with Richard Everitt (Warwick) on linking ABC and pseudo-marginal MCMC by bootstrap. Actually, the notion of ABC likelihood was already proposed as pseudo-marginal ABC by Anthony Lee, Christophe Andrieu and Arnaud Doucet in the discussion of Fearnhead and Prangle (2012) but I wonder at the focus of being unbiased when the quantity is not the truth, i.e. the “real” likelihood. It would seem more appropriate to attempt better kernel estimates on the distribution of the summary itself. The same session also involved David Frazier who linked our work on ABC for misspecified models and an on-going investigation of synthetic likelihood.

Later, there was a surprise occurrence of the Bernoulli factory in a talk by Radu Herbei on Gaussian process priors with accept-reject algorithms, leading to exact MCMC, although the computing implementation remains uncertain. And several discussions during the poster session, incl. one on the planning of a 2021 workshop in Oaxaca centred on objective Bayes advances as we received acceptance of our proposal by BIRS today!

On Day 2, David Blei gave a plenary introduction to variational Bayes inference and latent Dirichlet allocations, somewhat too introductory for my taste although other participants enjoyed this exposition. He also mentioned a recent JASA paper on the frequentist consistency of variational Bayes that I should check. Speaking later with PhD students, they really enjoyed this opening on an area they did not know that well.

A talk by Kengo Kamatani (whom I visited last summer) on improved ergodicity rates for heavy tailed targets and Crank-NIcholson modifications to the random walk proposal (which uses an AR(1) representation instead of the random walk). With the clever idea of adding the scale of the proposal as an extra parameter with a prior of its own. Gaining one order of magnitude in the convergence speed (i.e. from d to 1 and from d² to d, where d is the dimension), which is quite impressive (and just published in JAP).Veronica Rockova linked Bayesian variable selection and machine learning via ABC, with conditions on the prior for model consistency. And a novel approach using part of the data to learn an ABC partial posterior, which reminded me of the partial  Bayes factors of the 1990’s although it is presumably unrelated. And a replacement of the original rejection ABC via multi-armed bandits, where each variable is represented by an arm, called ABC Bayesian forests. Recalling the simulation trick behind Thompson’s approach, reproduced for the inclusion or exclusion of variates and producing a fixed estimate for the (marginal) inclusion probabilities, which makes it sound like a prior-feeback form of empirical Bayes. Followed by a talk of Gregor Kastner on MCMC handling of large time series with specific priors and a massive number of parameters.

The afternoon also had a wealth of exciting talks and missed opportunities (in the other sessions!). Which ended up with a strong if unintended French bias since I listened to Christophe Andrieu, Gabriel Stolz, Umut Simsekli, and Manon Michel on different continuous time processes, with Umut linking GANs, multidimensional optimal transport, sliced-Wasserstein, generative models, and new stochastic differential equations. Manon Michel gave a highly intuitive talk on creating non-reversibility, getting rid of refreshment rates in PDMPs to kill any form of reversibility.

MCMskv #1 [room with a view]

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 6, 2016 by xi'an

That’s it!, MCMskv has now started! We hold our round-table Monday night, which ended with most of my interventions revolving about the importance of models. And of the fact that models are always approximate (and wrong), hence that uncertainty and uncertainty ascertainment is paramount. Even more with large datasets and roundtablehigh-dimensional models. Apologies to the audience if I sounded like running on a very short loop. (And maybe also for the round-table to keep them from their dinner!)  Still, I got some items for reflection out of this discussion, including the notion that big data is usually and inappropriately associated with an impression of completeness that is almost deterministic in a Laplacian sense. Namely that the available data for, say, all Facebook users, seems to allow us (or The Machine) to play Laplace’s Demon. And thus forgoes the need for uncertainty and uncertainty ascertainment. Which obviously clashes with the issues of poor data, inappropriate models, and time or space stationarity of the available information.

Two more computing-related notions that came out the discussion [for me] are asynchronicity (in the sense explored by Terenin et al. a few months ago) and subsampling, The later seems to mean many things, judging from the discussion from the panel and the audience. For me, it corresponded to the ability (or inability) to handle only part of the available data to simulate the posterior associated with this available data.

The first talk on Tuesday morning was the plenary talk by Michael Jordan about his incorporation of complexity constraints on the convergence of an MCMC variable selection algorithm. (I though I had commented this paper in the past on the ‘Og but apparently I did not!) This was quite interesting, with ultra-fast convergence of the sampler. The talk was alas made harder to follow because of a cameraman standing in front of most of the audience for the entire time, as in the above picture. (I also noticed the interesting randomness of the light panels, who all display different patterns of dots, maybe random enough to satisfy a randomness test!) Another if irrelevant annoying fact was that I discovered upon arrival that my airbnb rental was located 8 kilometres away from the conference location, in a completely different town! Thankfully, we had rented a car [for 5] which saved the day (and even more the night!).

a day for comments

Posted in Mountains, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 21, 2014 by xi'an

As I was flying over Skye (with [maybe] a first if hazy perspective on the Cuillin ridge!) to Iceland, three long sets of replies to some of my posts appeared on the ‘Og:

Thanks to them for taking the time to answer my musings…

 

shrinkage-thresholding MALA for Bayesian variable selection

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on March 10, 2014 by xi'an

IMG_2515Amandine Shreck along with her co-authors Gersende Fort, Sylvain LeCorff, and Eric Moulines, all from Telecom Paristech, has undertaken to revisit the problem of large p small n variable selection. The approach they advocate mixes Langevin algorithms with trans-model moves with shrinkage thresholding. The corresponding Markov sampler is shown to be geometrically ergodic, which may be a première in that area. The paper was arXived in December but I only read it on my flight to Calgary, not overly distracted by the frozen plains of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Nor by my neighbour watching Hunger Games II.)

A shrinkage-thresholding operator is defined as acting on the regressor matrix towards producing sparse versions of this matrix. (I actually had trouble picturing the model until Section 2.2 where the authors define the multivariate regression model, making the regressors a matrix indeed. With a rather unrealistic iid Gaussian noise. And with an unknown number of relevant rows, hence a varying dimension model. Note that this is a strange regression in that the regression coefficients are known and constant across all models.) Because the Langevin algorithm requires a gradient to operate, the log target is divided between a differentiable and a non-differentiable parts, the later accommodating the Dirac masses in the dominating measure. The new MALA moves involve applying the above shrinkage-thresholding operator to a regular Langevin proposal, hence moving to sub-spaces and sparser representations.

The thresholding functions are based on positive part operators, which means that the Markov chain does not visit some neighbourhoods of zero in the embedding and in the sparser spaces. In other words, the proposal operates between models of varying dimensions without further ado because the point null hypotheses are replaced with those neighbourhoods. Hence it is not exactly simulating from the “original” posterior, which may be a minor caveat or not. Not if defining the neighbourhoods is driven by an informed or at least spelled-out choice of a neighbourhood of zero where the coefficients are essentially identified with zero. The difficulty is then in defining how close is close enough. Especially since the thresholding functions seem to all depend on a single number which does not depend on the regressor matrix. It would be interesting to see if the g-prior version could be developed as well… Actually, I would have also included a dose of g-prior in the Langevin move, rather than using an homogeneous normal noise.

The paper contains a large experimental part where the performances of the method are evaluated on various simulated datasets. It includes a comparison with reversible jump MCMC, which slightly puzzles me: (a) I cannot see from the paper whether or not the RJMCMC is applied to the modified (thresholded) posterior, as a regular RJMCMC would not aim at the same target, but the appendix does not indicate a change of target; (b) the mean error criterion for which STMALA does better than RJMCMC is not defined, but the decrease of this criterion along iterations seems to indicate that convergence has not yet occured, since it does not completely level up after 3 10⁵ iterations.

I must have mentioned it in another earlier post, but I find somewhat ironical to see those thresholding functions making a comeback after seeing the James-Stein and smooth shrinkage estimators taking over the then so-called pre-test versions in the 1970’s (Judge and Bock, 1978) and 1980’s. There are obvious reasons for this return, moving away from quadratic loss being one.