Archive for Bayes(Pharma)

Bayesian biostatistics in Lyon 2019

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , on November 8, 2018 by xi'an

Bayes, reproducibility, and the quest for truth

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 2, 2016 by xi'an

“Avoid opinion priors, you could be held legally or otherwise responsible.”

Don Fraser, Mylène Bedard, Augustine Wong, Wei Lin, and Ailana Fraser wrote a paper to appear in Statistical Science, with the above title. This paper is a continuation of Don’s assessment of Bayes procedures in earlier Statistical Science [which I discussed] and Science 2013 papers, which I would qualify with all due respect of a demolition enterprise [of the Bayesian approach to statistics]…  The argument therein is similar in that “reproducibility” is to be understood therein as providing frequentist confidence assessment. The authors also use “accuracy” in this sense. (As far as I know, there is no definition of reproducibility to be found in the paper.) Some priors are matching priors, in the (restricted) sense that they give second-order accurate frequentist coverage. Most are not matching and none is third-order accurate, a level that may be attained by alternative approaches. As far as the abstract goes, this seems to be the crux of the paper. Which is fine, but does not qualify in my opinion as a criticism of the Bayesian paradigm, given that (a) it makes no claim at frequentist coverage and (b) I see no reason in proper coverage being connected with “truth” or “accuracy”. It truly makes no sense to me to attempt either to put a frequentist hat on posterior distributions or to check whether or not the posterior is “valid”, “true” or “actual”. I similarly consider that Efron‘s “genuine priors” do not belong to the Bayesian paradigm but are on the opposite anti-Bayesian in that they suggest all priors should stem from frequency modelling, to borrow the terms from the current paper. (This is also the position of the authors, who consider they have “no Bayes content”.)

Among their arguments, the authors refer to two tragic real cases: the earthquake at L’Aquila, where seismologists were charged (and then discharged) with manslaughter for asserting there was little risk of a major earthquake, and the indictment of the pharmaceutical company Merck for the deadly side-effects of their drug Vioxx. The paper however never return to those cases and fails to explain in which sense this is connected with the lack of reproducibility or of truth(fullness) of Bayesian procedures. If anything, the morale of the Aquila story is that statisticians should not draw definitive conclusions like there is no risk of a major earthquake or that it was improbable. There is a strange if human tendency for experts to reach definitive conclusions and to omit the many layers of uncertainty in their models and analyses. In the earthquake case, seismologists do not know how to predict major quakes from the previous activity and that should have been the [non-]conclusion of the experts. Which could possibly have been reached by a Bayesian modelling that always includes uncertainty. But the current paper is not at all operating at this (epistemic?) level, as it never ever questions the impact of the choice of a likelihood function or of a statistical model in the reproducibility framework. First, third or 47th order accuracy nonetheless operates strictly within the referential of the chosen model and providing the data to another group of scientists, experts or statisticians will invariably produce a different statistical modelling. So much for reproducibility or truth.

ISBA [officially] on drugs

Posted in pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on September 11, 2012 by xi'an

Following a call in June for sponsoring a new ISBA section on biostatistics and pharmaceutical statistics, relayed by this blog, the process has now reached its natural conclusion and ISBA/BioPharm is now an official session of ISBA! It is quite straightforward to become a (founding) member, just one click away… Just to borrow from the initial call:

An important aspect of biostat and pharmaceutical statistics is the presence of strong communities in academics, industry and government agencies. We hope that the new section will play an important role in connecting folks across these different communities and giving a platform to related intiatives. The initial officers of the section are

*  Section chair: Donald A. Berry (Term: August 2012-December 2014)
*  Program chair: Telba Z. Irony (Term: July 2012-December 2013)
*  Secretary: Peter Mueller (Term: July 2012-December 2014)
*  Treasurer: Kathryn Chaloner (Term: July 2012-December 2013)

Please join now to participate in the first election this October of the new chair elect!  Lifetime memberships are $200 while annual memberships are $10. All new memberships after September 1 will be extended until Dec 31, 2013!

Note that we should pretty soon be allowed to announce a similar creation for BayesComp, the computational Bayes section of ISBA!

Biostat/Pharma is coming to ISBA [guest post]

Posted in Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , on June 19, 2012 by xi'an

This post is written by Julien Cornebise :

Along with Telba Irony, Peter Mueller, and Gary Rosner, I have the pleasure to be co-founding a dedicated Biostat/Pharma section of ISBA.

Its aim is to help network and federate under a common well-known “brand” the many initiatives to spread Bayesian methods and ideas in Biostats and Pharmacological stats: for example workshops, short courses, continuing education, sessions within larger conferences, etc.

We also want to help bridge academic and industry in this regard: there are plenty of people on both sides with excellent ideas and stimulating problems, and we think that such an ISBA’s section could help connecting them.

You can already sign the opening petition: we aim to have this section open by the end of the summer. Besides, I will be in ISBA 2012 in Kyoto next week: if you have questions, suggestions, or existing initiatives that could benefit from this branding, I will be glad to meet with yoi!

Post-scriptum: to sign the opening petition, you need to already be or become an ISBA member (50 USD, much worth it!)

Bayes on drugs (guest post)

Posted in Books, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on May 21, 2012 by xi'an

This post is written by Julien Cornebise.

Last week in Aachen was the 3rd Edition of the Bayes(Pharma) workshop. Its specificity: half-and-half industry/academic participants and speakers, all in Pharmaceutical statistics, with a great care to welcome newcomers to Bayes, so as to spread as much as possible the love where it will actually be used. First things first: all the slides are available online, thanks to the speakers for sharing those. Full disclaimer: being part of the scientific committee of the workshop, I had a strong subjective prior.

3 days, 70 participants, we were fully booked, and even regretfully had to refuse inscriptions due to lack of room-space (!! German regulations are quite… enforced). Time to size it up for next year, maybe?

My most vivid impression overall: I was struck by the interactivity of the questions/answers after each talk. Rarely fewer than 5 questions per talk (come on, we’ve all attended sessions where the chairman is forced to ask the lone question — no such thing here!), on all points of each talk, with cross-references from one question to the other, even from one *talk* to the other! Seeing so much interaction and discussion in spite of (or, probably, thanks to ?) the diversity of the audience was a real treat: not only did the questions bring up additional details about the talk, they were, more importantly, bringing very precious highlight on the questioners’ mindsets, their practical concerns and needs. Both academics and industrials were learning on all counts — and, for having sometimes seen failed marriages of the kind in the past (either a French round-table degenerating in nasty polemic on “research-induced tax credit”, or just plain mismatch of interests), I was quite impressed that we were purely and simply all interested in multiple facets of the very same thing: the interface between pharma and stats.

As is now a tradition, the first day was a short course, this time by Pr. Emmanuel Lessaffre: based on his upcoming book on Bayesian Biostatistics (Xian, maybe a review someday?), it was meant to be introductory for newcomers to Bayes, but was still packed with enough “tricks of the trades” that even seasoned Bayesians could get something out of it. I very much appreciated the pedagogy in the “live” examples, with clear convergence caveats based on traceplots of common software (WinBUGS). The most vivid memory: his strong spotlight on INLA as “the future of Bayesian computation”. Although my research is mostly on MCMC/SMC, I’m now damn curious to give it a serious try — this was further reinforced by late evening discussions with Gianluca BaioM, who revealed that all his results that were all obtained in seconds of INLA computing.

Day 2 and half-day 3 were invited and contributed talks, all motivated by top-level applications. No convergence theorems here, but practical issues, with constraints that theoreticians (including myself!) would hardly guess exist: very small sample sizes, regulatory issues, concurrence with legacy methodology with only seconds-long runtime (impossible to run 1 million MCMC steps!), and sometimes even imposed software due to validation processes! Again, as stated above, the number and quality of questions is really what I will keep from those 2 days.

If I had to state one regret, maybe, it would be this unsatisfactory feeling that, for many newcomers, MCMC = WinBUGS — with its obvious restrictions. The lesson I learned: all the great methodological advances of the last 10 years, especially in Adaptive MCMC, have not yet reached most practitioners yet, since they need *tools* they can use. It may be a sign that, as methodological researchers, we should maybe put a stronger emphasis on bringing software packages forward (for R, of course, but also for JAGS or OpenBUGS!); not only a zip-file with our article’s codes, but a full-fledged package, with ongoing support, maintenance, and forum. That’s a tough balance to find, since the time maintaining a package does not count in the holy-bibliometry… but doesn’t it have more actual impact? Besides, more packages = less papers but also = more citations of the corresponding paper. Some do take this road (Robert Gramacy’s packages were cited last week as examples of great support, and Andy Gelman and Matt Hoffman are working on the much-expected STAN, and I mentioned above Havard Rue’s R-INLA), but I don’t think it is yet considered “best practices”.

As a conclusion, this Bayes-Pharma 2012 workshop reminded me a lot of the SAMSI 2010 Summer Program: while Bayes-Pharma aims to be much more introductory, they had in common this same success in blending pharma-industry and academy. Could it be a specificity of pharma? In which case, I’m looking very much forward opening ISBA’s Specialized Section on Biostat/Pharmastat that a few colleagues and I are currently working on (more on this here soon). With such a crowd on both sides of the Atlantic, and a looming Bayes 2013 in the Netherlands, that will be exciting.