Archive for Catholic Church

The Long, Cruel History of the Anti-Abortion Crusade [reposted]

Posted in Books, Kids, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , on July 14, 2019 by xi'an

[Excerpts from an editorial in the NYT of John Irving, American author of the Cider House Rules novel we enjoyed reading 30 years ago]

“(…) I respect your personal reasons not to have an abortion — no one is forcing you to have one. I respect your choice. I’m pro-choice — often called pro-abortion by the anti-abortion crusaders, although no one is pro-abortion. What’s unequal about the argument is the choice; the difference between pro-life and pro-choice is the choice. Pro-life proponents have no qualms about forcing women to go through childbirth — they give women no choice (…)

I must remind the Roman Catholic Church of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” In other words, we are free to practice the religion of our choice, and we are protected from having someone else’s religion practiced on us. Freedom of religion in the United States also means freedom from religion (…)

The prevailing impetus to oppose abortion is to punish the woman who doesn’t want the child. The sacralizing of the fetus is a ploy. How can “life” be sacred (and begin at six weeks, or at conception), if a child’s life isn’t sacred after it’s born? Clearly, a woman’s life is never sacred; as clearly, a woman has no reproductive rights (…)

Of an unmarried woman or girl who got pregnant, people of my grandparents’ generation used to say: “She is paying the piper.” Meaning, she deserves what she gets — namely, to give birth to a child. That cruelty is the abiding impetus behind the dishonestly named right-to-life movement. Pro-life always was (and remains) a marketing term. Whatever the anti-abortion crusaders call themselves, they don’t care what happens to an unwanted child — not after the child is born — and they’ve never cared about the mother.”

cuida tu vestido y no hables tanto, Jorge!

Posted in Books, pictures with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 22, 2019 by xi'an

“”In our societies, it even seems homosexuality is fashionable. And this mentality, in some way, also influences the life of the Church (..) Therefore, the Church recommends that people with that kind of ingrained tendency should not be accepted into the ministry or consecrated life. The ministry or the consecrated life is not his place.” [En nuestras sociedades parece incluso que la homosexualidad está de moda y esa mentalidad, de alguna manera, también influye en la vida de la Iglesia (…) En la vida consagrada y en la vida sacerdotal, ese tipo de afectos no tienen cabida] 2 December 2018

“One cannot live a whole life of accusing, accusing, accusing, the Church. Those who spend their lives accusing, accusing, accusing are not the devil’s children because the devil has none. [They are] friends, cousins and relatives of the devil, and this is wrong.” 22 February 2019

“It is becoming increasingly clear that we are now facing with what might accurately be called an educational crisis, especially in the field of affectivity and sexuality. [Gender theory] denies the difference and reciprocity in nature of a man and a woman and envisages a society without sexual differences, thereby eliminating the anthropological basis of the family. This ideology leads to educational programs and legislative enactments that promote a personal identity and emotional intimacy radically separated from the biological difference between male and female. Consequently, human identity becomes the choice of the individual, one which can also change over time.” Male and Female He Created Them: Towards a path of dialogue on the question of gender in education, June 2019

in the Pantheon [jatp]

Posted in pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2019 by xi'an

questioning the Bayesian choice

Posted in Books, Kids, Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on November 13, 2018 by xi'an

When I woke up (very early!) in Oaxaca, on Remembrance Day, I noticed a long question about The Bayesian Choice contents on X validated. The originator of the question (OQ) was puzzled about several statements in the book on maximum entropy  methods, from the nature of the moment constraints, outside standard moments, to the existence of a maximum entropy prior (as exemplified by quantiles), to the deeper issue of the ultimate arbitrariness of “the” maximum entropy prior since it is also determined by the choice of the dominating measure. (Never neglect the dominating measure!) A more challenging concept, hopefully making it home with the OQ.

cuida tu vestido y no hables tanto, Jorge!

Posted in Kids, pictures with tags , , , , , , on November 12, 2018 by xi'an

“Last century, the whole world was scandalized by what the Nazis did to purify the race. Today, we do the same thing but with white gloves” June 16, 2018 [ “Il secolo scorso tutto il mondo era scandalizzato per quello che facevano i nazisti per curare la purezza della razza. Oggi facciamo lo stesso ma con i guanti bianchi”]

“Abortion is not the lesser of two evils. It is a crime, an absolute evil”  Feb. 19, 2016

“Is it fair to hire a contract killer to solve a problem? It is not fair. We cannot take out a human being, even if it is small.” Oct. 10. 2018 [“E’ giusto affittare un sicario per risolvere un problema? Non si può, non è giusto fare fuori un essere umano, benché piccolo, per risolvere un problema”]

repeal!

Posted in Kids with tags , , , , , , , , on May 24, 2018 by xi'an

la belle sauvage [book review]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 25, 2018 by xi'an

Another book I brought back from Austin. And another deeply enjoyable one, although not the end of a trilogy of trilogies this time. This book, La Belle Sauvage, is first in a new trilogy by Philip Pullman that goes back to the early infancy of the hero of His Dark Materials, Lyra. Later volumes will take place after the first trilogy.

This is very much a novel about Oxford, to the point it sometimes seems written only for people with an Oxonian connection. After all, the author is living in Oxford… (Having the boat of the two characters passing by the [unnamed] department of Statistics at St. Giles carried away by the flood was a special sentence for me!)

Also, in continuation of His Dark Materials, a great steampunk universe, with a very oppressive Church and so far a limited used of magicks! Limited to the daemons, again in continuation with past volumes…

Now, some passages of the book remind me of Ishiguro’s buried giant, in the sense that the characters meeting myths from other stories may “really” meet them or instead dream. This is for instance the case when they accost at a property where an outworldy party is taking place and no-one is noticing them. Or when they meet a true giant that is a river deity, albeit not in the spirit of Ben Aaronovitch’s Rivers of London novels.

The story is written in the time honoured setup of teenager discovery travels, with not so much to discover as the whole country is covered by water. And the travel gets a wee bit boring after a while, with a wee bit too many coincidences, the inexplicable death (?) of a villain, and an hurried finale, where the reverse trip of the main characters takes a page rather than one book…

Trivia: La Belle Sauvage was also the name of the pub in Ludgate Hill where Pocahontas and her brother Tomocomo stayed when they first arrived in London. And The Trout is a true local pub, on the other side of Port Meadow [although I never managed to run that far in that direction while staying in St. Hugh, Oxford, last time, the meadow being flooded!].

Looking forward the second volume (already written, so no risk of The Name of the Wind or Game of Thrones quagmires, i.e., an endless wait for the next volume!), hoping the author keeps up the good work, the right tension in the story, and avoids by all means parallel universes, which were so annoying in the first trilogy! (I do remember loosing interest in the story during the second book and having trouble finishing the third one. I am not sure my son [who started before me] ever completed the trilogy…)