Archive for change-point

Bayesian inference with no likelihood

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on January 28, 2020 by xi'an

This week I made a quick trip to Warwick for the defence (or viva) of the PhD thesis of Jack Jewson, containing novel perspectives on constructing Bayesian inference without likelihood or without complete trust in said likelihood. The thesis aimed at constructing minimum divergence posteriors in an M-open perspective and built a rather coherent framework from principles to implementation. There is a clear link with the earlier work of Bissiri et al. (2016), with further consistency constraints where the outcome must recover the true posterior in the M-closed scenario (if not always the case with the procedures proposed in the thesis).

Although I am partial to the use of empirical likelihoods in setting, I appreciated the position of the thesis and the discussion of the various divergences towards the posterior derivation (already discussed on this blog) , with interesting perspectives on the calibration of the pseudo-posterior à la Bissiri et al. (2016). Among other things, the thesis pointed out a departure from the likelihood principle and some of its most established consequences, like Bayesian additivity. In that regard, there were connections with generative adversarial networks (GANs) and their Bayesian versions that could have been explored. And an impression that the type of Bayesian robustness explored in the thesis has more to do with outliers than with misspecification. Epsilon-contamination amodels re quite specific as it happens, in terms of tails and other things.

The next chapter is somewhat “less” Bayesian in my view as it considers a generalised form of variational inference. I agree that the view of the posterior as a solution to an optimisation is tempting but changing the objective function makes the notion less precise.  Which makes reading it somewhat delicate as it seems to dilute the meaning of both prior and posterior to the point of becoming irrelevant.

The last chapter on change-point models is quite alluring in that it capitalises on the previous developments to analyse a fairly realistic if traditional problem, applied to traffic in London, prior and posterior to the congestion tax. However, there is always an issue with robustness and outliers in that the notion is somewhat vague or informal. Things start clarifying at the end but I find surprising that conjugates are robust optimal solutions since the usual folk theorem from the 80’s is that they are not robust.

ISBA 2016 [#5]

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2016 by xi'an

from above Forte Village, Santa Magherita di Pula, Sardinia, June 17, 2016On Thursday, I started the day by a rather masochist run to the nearby hills, not only because of the very hour but also because, by following rabbit trails that were not intended for my size, I ended up being scratched by thorns and bramble all over!, but also with neat views of the coast around Pula.  From there, it was all downhill [joke]. The first morning talk I attended was by Paul Fearnhead and about efficient change point estimation (which is an NP hard problem or close to). The method relies on dynamic programming [which reminded me of one of my earliest Pascal codes about optimising a dam debit]. From my spectator’s perspective, I wonder[ed] at easier models, from Lasso optimisation to spline modelling followed by testing equality between bits. Later that morning, James Scott delivered the first Bayarri Lecture, created in honour of our friend Susie who passed away between the previous ISBA meeting and this one. James gave an impressive coverage of regularisation through three complex models, with the [hopefully not degraded by my translation] message that we should [as Bayesians] focus on important parts of those models and use non-Bayesian tools like regularisation. I can understand the practical constraints for doing so, but optimisation leads us away from a Bayesian handling of inference problems, by removing the ascertainment of uncertainty…

Later in the afternoon, I took part in the Bayesian foundations session, discussing the shortcomings of the Bayes factor and suggesting the use of mixtures instead. With rebuttals from [friends in] the audience!

This session also included a talk by Victor Peña and Jim Berger analysing and answering the recent criticisms of the Likelihood principle. I am not sure this answer will convince the critics, but I won’t comment further as I now see the debate as resulting from a vague notion of inference in Birnbaum‘s expression of the principle. Jan Hannig gave another foundation talk introducing fiducial distributions (a.k.a., Fisher’s Bayesian mimicry) but failing to provide a foundational argument for replacing Bayesian modelling. (Obviously, I am definitely prejudiced in this regard.)

The last session of the day was sponsored by BayesComp and saw talks by Natesh Pillai, Pierre Jacob, and Eric Xing. Natesh talked about his paper on accelerated MCMC recently published in JASA. Which surprisingly did not get discussed here, but would definitely deserve to be! As hopefully corrected within a few days, when I recoved from conference burnout!!! Pierre Jacob presented a work we are currently completing with Chris Holmes and Lawrence Murray on modularisation, inspired from the cut problem (as exposed by Plummer at MCMski IV in Chamonix). And Eric Xing spoke about embarrassingly parallel solutions, discussed a while ago here.