Archive for CIRM

QMC at CIRM

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 21, 2020 by xi'an

non-reversible gerrymandering

Posted in Books, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on September 3, 2020 by xi'an

Gregory Herschlag, Jonathan C. Mattingly [whom I met in Oaxaca and who acknowledges helpful conversations with Manon Michel while at CIRM two years ago], Matthias Sachs, and Evan Wyse just posted an arXiv paper using non-reversible MCMC methods to improve sampling of voting district plans towards fighting (partisan) Gerrymandering. In doing so we extend thecurrent framework for construction of non-reversible Markov chains on discrete samplingspaces by considering a generalization of skew detailed balance. Since this means sampling in a discrete space, the method using lifting. Meaning adding a dichotomous dummy variable, “based on a notion of flowing the center of mass of districts along a defined vector field”. The paper is quite detailed about the validation and the implementation of the method. With this interesting illustration for the mixing properties of the different versions:

 

souvenirs de Luminy

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 6, 2020 by xi'an

Chateau du Lucquet

Posted in pictures, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , on March 20, 2019 by xi'an

Nature tea[dbits]

Posted in Books, pictures, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2019 by xi'an

A very special issue of Nature (7 February 2019, vol. 556, no. 7742). With an outlook section on tea, plus a few research papers (and ads) on my principal beverage. News about the REF, Elsevier’s and Huawei’s woes with the University of California, the dangerous weakening of Title IX by the Trump administration, and a long report on the statistical analysis of Hurricane Maria deaths, involving mostly epidemiologists, but also Patrick Ball who took part in our Bayes for Good workshop at CIRM. Plus China’s food crisis and ways to reduce cropland losses and food waste. Concerning the tea part(y), a philogenetic study of different samples led to the theory that tea was domesticated thrice, twice in Yunnan (China) and once in Assam (India), with a divergence estimated at more than twenty thousand years ago. Another article on Pu-Ehr, with the potential impacts of climate change on this very unique tea. With a further remark that higher altitudes increase the anti-oxydant level of tea… And a fascinating description of agro-forestry where tea and vegetables are grown in a forest that regulates sun exposure, moisture evaporation, and soil nutrients.