Archive for curse of dimensionality

the curse of large dimension [teaser]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , on January 11, 2018 by xi'an

MCM 2017

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 3, 2017 by xi'an

And thus I am back in Montréal, for MCM 2017, located in HEC Montréal, on the campus of Université de Montréal, for three days. My talk is predictably about ABC, what else?!, gathering diverse threads from different talks and papers:

marginal likelihoods from MCMC

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 26, 2017 by xi'an

A new arXiv entry on ways to approximate marginal likelihoods based on MCMC output, by astronomers (apparently). With an application to the 2015 Planck satellite analysis of cosmic microwave background radiation data, which reminded me of our joint work with the cosmologists of the Paris Institut d’Astrophysique ten years ago. In the literature review, the authors miss several surveys on the approximation of those marginals, including our San Antonio chapter, on Bayes factors approximations, but mention our ABC survey somewhat inappropriately since it is not advocating the use of ABC for such a purpose. (They mention as well variational Bayes approximations, INLA, powered likelihoods, if not nested sampling.)

The proposal of this paper is to identify the marginal m [actually denoted a there] as the normalising constant of an unnormalised posterior density. And to do so the authors estimate the posterior by a non-parametric approach, namely a k-nearest-neighbour estimate. With the additional twist of producing a sort of Bayesian posterior on the constant m. [And the unusual notion of number density, used for the unnormalised posterior.] The Bayesian estimation of m relies on a Poisson sampling assumption on the k-nearest neighbour distribution. (Sort of, since k is actually fixed, not random.)

If the above sounds confusing and imprecise it is because I am myself rather mystified by the whole approach and find it difficult to see the point in this alternative. The Bayesian numerics does not seem to have other purposes than producing a MAP estimate. And using a non-parametric density estimate opens a Pandora box of difficulties, the most obvious one being the curse of dimension(ality). This reminded me of the commented paper of Delyon and Portier where they achieve super-efficient convergence when using a kernel estimator, but with a considerable cost and a similar sensitivity to dimension.

seeking the error in nested sampling

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , on April 13, 2017 by xi'an

A newly arXived paper on the error in nested sampling, written by Higson and co-authors, and read in Berlin, looks at the difficult task of evaluating the sampling error of nested sampling. The conclusion is essentially negative in that the authors recommend multiple runs of the method to assess the magnitude of the variability of the output by bootstrap, i.e. to call for the most empirical approach…

The core of this difficulty lies in the half-plug-in, half-quadrature, half-Monte Carlo (!) feature of the nested sampling algorithm, in that (i) the truncation of the unit interval is based on a expectation of the mass of each shell (i.e., the zone between two consecutive isoclines of the likelihood, (ii) the evidence estimator is a quadrature formula, and (iii) the level of the likelihood at the truncation is replaced with a simulated value that is not even unbiased (and correlated with the previous value in the case of an MCMC implementation). As discussed in our paper with Nicolas, the error in the evidence approximation is of the same order as other Monte Carlo methods in that it gets down like the square root of the number of terms at each iteration. Contrary to earlier intuitions that focussed on the error due to the quadrature.

But the situation is much less understood when the resulting sample is used for estimation of quantities related with the posterior distribution. With no clear approach to assess and even less correct the resulting error, since it is not solely a Monte Carlo error. As noted by the authors, the quadrature approximation to the univariate integral replaces the unknown prior weight of a shell with its Beta order statistic expectation and the average of the likelihood over the shell with a single (uniform???) realisation. Or the mean value of a transform of the parameter with a single (biased) realisation. Since most posterior expectations can be represented as integrals over likelihood levels of the average value over an iso-likelihood contour. The approach advocated in the paper involved multiple threads of an “unwoven nested sampling run”, which means launching n nested sampling runs with one living term from the n currents living points in the current nested sample. (Those threads may then later be recombined into a single nested sample.) This is the starting point to a nested flavour of bootstrapping, where threads are sampled with replacement, from which confidence intervals and error estimates can be constructed. (The original notion appears in Skilling’s 2006 paper, but I missed it.)

The above graphic is an attempt within the paper at representing the (marginal) posterior of a transform f(θ). That I do not fully understand… The notations are rather horrendous as X is not the data but the prior probability for the likelihood to be above a given bound which is actually the corresponding quantile. (There is no symbol for data and £ is used for the likelihood function as well as realisations of the likelihood function…) A vertical slice on the central panel gives the posterior distribution of f(θ) given the event that the likelihood is in the corresponding upper tail. Or given the corresponding shell (?).

high dimension Metropolis-Hastings algorithms

Posted in Books, Kids, Mountains, pictures, R, Statistics with tags , , , , , , on January 26, 2016 by xi'an

When discussing high dimension models with Ingmar Schüster Schuster [blame my fascination for accented characters!] the other day, we came across the following paradox with Metropolis-Hastings algorithms. If attempting to simulate from a multivariate standard normal distribution in a large dimension, when starting from the mode of the target, i.e., its mean γ, leaving the mode γis extremely unlikely, given the huge drop between the value of the density at the mode γ and at likely realisations (corresponding to the blue sequence). Even when relying on the very scale that makes the proposal identical to the target! Resorting to a tiny scale like Σ/p manages to escape the unhealthy neighbourhood of the highly unlikely mode (as shown with the brown sequence).

Here is the corresponding R code:

p=100
T=1e3
mh=mu #mode as starting value
vale=rep(0,T)
for (t in 1:T){
prop=mvrnorm(1,mh,sigma/p)
if (log(runif(1))<logdmvnorm(prop,mu,sigma)-
   logdmvnorm(mh,mu,sigma)) mh=prop
vale[t]=logdmvnorm(mh,mu,sigma)}

bouncy particle sampler

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on October 30, 2015 by xi'an

 Alexandre Bouchard-Coté, Sebastian Vollmer and Arnaud Doucet just arXived a paper with the above title, which reminded me of a proposal Kerrie Mengersen and I made at Valencia 7, in Tenerife, the [short-lived!] pinball sampler. This sampler was a particle (MCMC) sampler where we used the location of the other particles to avoid their neighbourhood, by bouncing away from them according to a delayed rejection principle, with an overall Gibbs justification since the resulting target was the product of copies of the target distribution. The difficulty in implementing the (neat!) idea was in figuring out the amount of bouncing or, in more physical terms, the energy allocated to the move.

In the current paper, inspired from an earlier paper in physics, the Markov chain (or single particle) evolves by linear moves, changing directions according to a Poisson process, with intensity and direction depending on the target distribution. A local version takes advantage of a decomposition of the target into a product of terms involving only some components of the whole parameter to be simulated. And hence allowing for moves in subspaces. An extension proposed by the authors is to bounce along the Hamiltonian isoclines. The method is demonstrably ergodic and irreducible. In practice, I wonder at the level of calibration or preliminary testing required to facilitate the exploration of the parameter space, particularly in the local version that seems to multiply items to be calibrated.

likelihood-free inference in high-dimensional models

Posted in Books, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 1, 2015 by xi'an

“…for a general linear model (GLM), a single linear function is a sufficient statistic for each associated parameter…”

Water Tower, Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Oct. 31, 2012The recently arXived paper “Likelihood-free inference in high-dimensional models“, by Kousathanas et al. (July 2015), proposes an ABC resolution of the dimensionality curse [when the dimension of the parameter and of the corresponding summary statistics] by turning Gibbs-like and by using a component-by-component ABC-MCMC update that allows for low dimensional statistics. In the (rare) event there exists a conditional sufficient statistic for each component of the parameter vector, the approach is just as justified as when using a generic ABC-Gibbs method based on the whole data. Otherwise, that is, when using a non-sufficient estimator of the corresponding component (as, e.g., in a generalised [not general!] linear model), the approach is less coherent as there is no joint target associated with the Gibbs moves. One may therefore wonder at the convergence properties of the resulting algorithm. The only safe case [in dimension 2] is when one of the restricted conditionals does not depend on the other parameter. Note also that each Gibbs step a priori requires the simulation of a new pseudo-dataset, which may be a major imposition on computing time. And that setting the tolerance for each parameter is a delicate calibration issue because in principle the tolerance should depend on the other component values. Continue reading