Archive for delayed rejection sampling

more multiple proposal MCMC

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on July 26, 2018 by xi'an

Luo and Tjelmeland just arXived a paper on a new version of multiple-try Metropolis Hastings, the addendum being in defining the additional proposed copies via a dependence graph like (a) above, with one version from the target and all others from operational and conditional proposal kernels. Respecting the dependence graph, as in (b). As I did, you may then wonder where both the graph and the conditional do come from. Which reminds me of the pseudo-posteriors of Carlin and Chib (1995), even though this is not terribly connected. Green (1995).) (But not disconnected either since the authors mention But, given the graph, following a Gibbs scheme, one of the 17 nodes is chosen as generated from the target, using the proper conditional on that index [which is purely artificial from the point of view of the original simulation problem!]. As noted above, the graph is an issue, but since it is artificial, it can be devised to either allow for quasi-independence between the proposed values or on the opposite to induce long range dependence, which corresponds to conducting multiple MCMC steps before reaching the end nodes, a feature that is very appealing in my opinion. And reminds me of prefetching. (As I am listening to Nicolas Chopin’s lecture in Warwick at the moment, there also seems to be a connection with pMCMC.) Still, I remain unclear as to the devising of the graph of dependent proposals, as its depth should be somehow connected with the mixing properties of the original proposal. Gains in convergence may thus come at a high cost at the construction stage.

computational methods for statistical mechanics [day #4]

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 7, 2014 by xi'an

Arthur Seat, Edinburgh, Sep. 7, 2011

My last day at this ICMS workshop on molecular simulation started [with a double loop of Arthur’s Seat thankfully avoiding the heavy rains of the previous night and then] Chris Chipot‘s magistral entry to molecular simulation for proteins with impressive slides and simulation movies, even though I could not follow the details to really understand the simulation challenges therein, just catching a few connections with earlier talks. A typical example of a cross-disciplinary gap, where the other discipline always seems to be stressing the ‘wrong” aspects. Although this is perfectly unrealistic, it would immensely to prepare talks in pairs for such interdisciplinary workshops! Then Gersende Fort presented results about convergence and efficiency for the Wang-Landau algorithm. The idea is to find the optimal rate for updating the weights of the elements of the partition towards reaching the flat histogram in minimal time. Showing massive gains on toy examples. The next talk went back to molecular biology with Jérôme Hénin‘s presentation on improved adaptive biased sampling. With an exciting notion of orthogonality aiming at finding the slowest directions in the target and putting the computational effort. He also discussed the tension between long single simulations and short repeated ones, echoing a long-going debate in the MCMC community. (He also had a slide with a picture of my first 1983 Apple IIe computer!) Then Antonietta Mira gave a broad perspective on delayed rejection and zero variance estimates. With impressive variance reductions (although some physicists then asked for reduction of order 10¹⁰!). Johannes Zimmer gave a beautiful maths talk on the connection between particle and diffusion limits (PDEs) and Wasserstein geometry and large deviations. (I did not get most of the talk, but it was nonetheless beautiful!) Bert Kappen concluded the day (and the workshop for me) by a nice introduction to control theory. Making connection between optimal control and optimal importance sampling. Which made me idly think of the following problem: what if control cannot be completely… controlled and hence involves a stochastic part? Presumably of little interest as the control would then be on the parameters of the distribution of the control.

“The alanine dipeptide is the fruit fly of molecular simulation.”

The example of this alanine dipeptide molecule was so recurrent during the talks that it justified the above quote by Michael Allen. Not that I am more proficient in the point of studying this protein or using it as a benchmark. Or in identifying the specifics of the challenges of molecular dynamics simulation. Not a criticism of the ICMS workshop obviously, but rather of my congenital difficulty with continuous time processes!!! So I do not return from Edinburgh with a new research collaborative project in molecular dynamics (if with more traditional prospects), albeit with the perception that a minimal effort could bring me to breach the vocabulary barrier. And maybe consider ABC ventures in those (new) domains. (Although I fear my talk on ABC did not impact most of the audience!)

Andrew gone NUTS!

Posted in pictures, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 24, 2011 by xi'an

Matthew Hoffman and Andrew Gelman have posted a paper on arXiv entitled “The No-U-Turn Sampler: Adaptively Setting Path Lengths in Hamiltonian Monte Carlo” and developing an improvement on the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo algorithm called NUTS (!). Here is the abstract:

Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (HMC) is a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm that avoids the random walk behavior and sensitivity to correlated parameters that plague many MCMC methods by taking a series of steps informed by first-order gradient information. These features allow it to converge to high-dimensional target distributions much more quickly than simpler methods such as random walk Metropolis or Gibbs sampling. However, HMC’s performance is highly sensitive to two user-specified parameters: a step size ε and a desired number of steps L. In particular, if L is too small then the algorithm exhibits undesirable random walk behavior, while if L is too large the algorithm wastes computation. We introduce the No-U-Turn Sampler (NUTS), an extension to HMC that eliminates the need to set a number of steps L. NUTS uses a recursive algorithm to build a set of likely candidate points that spans a wide swath of the target distribution, stopping automatically when it starts to double back and retrace its steps. Empirically, NUTS perform at least as efficiently as and sometimes more efficiently than a well tuned standard HMC method, without requiring user intervention or costly tuning runs. We also derive a method for adapting the step size parameter ε on the fly based on primal-dual averaging. NUTS can thus be used with no hand-tuning at all. NUTS is also suitable for applications such as BUGS-style automatic inference engines that require efficient “turnkey” sampling algorithms.

Now, my suspicious and pessimistic nature always makes me wary of universality claims! I completely acknowledge the difficulty in picking the number of leapfrog steps L in the Hamiltonian algorithm, since the theory behind does not tell anything useful about L. And the paper is quite convincing in its description of the NUTS algorithm, being moreover beautifully written.  As indicated in the paper, the “doubling” solution adopted by NUTS is reminding me of Radford Neal’s procedure in his Annals of Statistics paper on slice sampling. (The NUTS algorithm also relies on a slice sampling step.) However, besides its ability to work as an automatic Hamiltonian methodology, I wonder about the computing time (and the “unacceptably large amount of memory”, p.12) required by the doubling procedure: 2j is growing fast with j! (If my intuition is right, the computing time should increase rather quickly with the dimension. And I do not get the argument within the paper that the costly part is the gradient computation: it seems to me the gradient must be computed for all of the 2j points.) The authors also mention delayed rejection à la Tierney and Mira (1999) and the scheme reminded me a wee of the pinball sampler we devised a while ago with Kerrie Mengersen. Choosing the discretisation step ε is more “traditional”, using the stochastic approximation approach we set in our unpublished-yet-often-quoted tech report with Christophe Andrieu. (I do not think I got the crux of the “dual averaging” for optimal calibration on p.11) The illustration through four benchmarks [incl. a stochastic volatility model!] is quite convincing as well, with (unsurprisingly) great graphical tools. A final grumble: that the code is “only” available in the proprietary language Matlab! Now, I bet some kind of Rao-Blackwellisation is feasible with all the intermediate simulations!