Archive for dimsum

day zero at ISBA 22

Posted in Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2022 by xi'an

Very smooth trip to Montréal, esp. when considering the global trend of travel disruptions. Nothing lost (except for a tea thermos filter), nothing broken or stolen from my bag, no delay, no queue at De Gaulle for once. I even got a front & window seat in the plane, with a quiet neighbour who slept most of the time (and kept her mask, thanks!), no disruption from other screens, and a six hour run for processing as many Biometrika submissions, with an almost instantaneous reply from one AE (or AE⁺⁺⁺!), solving a riddle from the Riddler, and booking a few things in Montréal like the local Vélib (biXi!!!) and a slot at the only pool that opens at 6:30 (thanks Amy and David!). Funny that the flight attendants came and checked everything was fine because I declined food and beverage for the entire flight (my habit nowadays).

And, despite a very hot day in Montréal, equally smooth access to my Airbnb, incl. the episode with a good Samaritan calling after a passenger in the [747] airport bus leaving without his bag! Enjoying kimchi dimsums at Harbin Dumplings while waiting (with no xiaolongbao on the menu!). And sampling later my first Montréal bagel of the trip (which was only OK!), while being surprised at the high cost of food in the dépanneur where I bought them.

Snapshots from 上海

Posted in pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , on June 15, 2011 by xi'an


Before joining the O’Bayes 2011 conference, Linda kindly took me on a quick morning tour of the Bund, the historical colonial district of Shanghai. This was very nice, bringing back memories of my friend José de Sam Lazaro telling me about his childhood there in the French concession, and the views of the Huangpu River in a mist [that did not lift for the whole day] were terrific. (The photo below not only gives an hazy idea of the Pudong district, but it incorporates a well-hidden statue of the former mayor of Shanghai in typical Maoist attire, as well as a few security cameras that seem to be everywhere.) However, I felt a bit sorry (and not only from a tourist’s point of view) that there was no visible remnant of an older Shanghai (I mean, older than the colonial buildings on the Bund) that seemed to have been entirely razed to build new tall buildings in a rather haphazard fashion… The whole city is brimming with construction work, from high-rise buildings in the centre to the many housing complexes I saw from the highway.


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