Archive for Dirichlet process Gaussian mixture

the most probable cluster

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , on July 11, 2019 by xi'an

In the last issue of Bayesian Analysis, Lukasz Rajkowski studies the most likely (MAP) cluster associated with the Dirichlet process mixture model. Reminding me that most Bayesian estimates of the number of clusters are not consistent (when the sample size grows to infinity). I am always puzzled by this problem, as estimating the number of clusters sounds like an ill-posed problem, since it is growing with the number of observations, by definition of the Dirichlet process. For instance, the current paper establishes that the number of clusters intersecting a given compact set remains bounded. (The setup is one of a Normal Dirichlet process mixture with constant and known covariance matrix.)

Since the posterior probability of a given partition of {1,2,…,n} can be (formally) computed, the MAP estimate can be (formally) derived. I inserted formally in the previous sentence as the derivation of the exact MAP is an NP hard problem in the number n of observations. As an aside, I have trouble with the author’s argument that the convex hulls of the clusters should be disjoin: I do not see why they should when the mixture components are overlapping. (More generally, I fail to relate to notions like “bad clusters” or “overestimation of the number of clusters” or a “sensible choice” of the covariance matrix.) More globally, I am somewhat perplexed by the purpose of the paper and the relevance of the MAP estimate, even putting aside my generic criticisms of the MAP approach. No uncertainty is attached to the estimator, which thus appears as a form of penalised likelihood strategy rather than a genuinely Bayesian (Analysis) solution.

The first example in the paper is using data from a Uniform over (-1,1), concluding at a “misleading” partition by the MAP since it produces more than one cluster. I find this statement flabbergasting as the generative model is not the estimated model. To wit, the case of an exponential Exp(1) sample that cannot reach a maximum of the target function with a finite number of sample. Which brings me back full-circle to my general unease about clustering in that much more seems to be assumed about this notion than what the statistical model delivers.

likelihood free nested sampling

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 26, 2019 by xi'an

A recent paper by Mikelson and Khammash found on bioRxiv considers the (paradoxical?) mixture of nested sampling and intractable likelihood. They however cover only the case when a particle filter or another unbiased estimator of the likelihood function can be found. Unless I am missing something in the paper, this seems a very costly and convoluted approach when pseudo-marginal MCMC is available. Or the rather substantial literature on computational approaches to state-space models. Furthermore simulating under the lower likelihood constraint gets even more intricate than for standard nested sampling as the parameter space is augmented with the likelihood estimator as an extra variable. And this makes a constrained simulation the harder, to the point that the paper need resort to a Dirichlet process Gaussian mixture approximation of the constrained density. It thus sounds quite an intricate approach to the problem. (For one of the realistic examples, the authors mention a 12 hour computation on a 48 core cluster. Producing an approximation of the evidence that is not unarguably stabilised, contrary to the above.) Once again, not being completely up-to-date in sequential Monte Carlo, I may miss a difficulty in analysing such models with other methods, but the proposal seems to be highly demanding with respect to the target.