Archive for empirical likelihood

a book and three chapters on ABC

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 9, 2019 by xi'an

In connection with our handbook on mixtures being published, here are three chapters I contributed to from the Handbook of ABC, edited by Scott Sisson, Yanan Fan, and Mark Beaumont:

6. Likelihood-free Model Choice, by J.-M. Marin, P. Pudlo, A. Estoup and C.P. Robert

12. Approximating the Likelihood in ABC, by  C. C. Drovandi, C. Grazian, K. Mengersen and C.P. Robert

17. Application of ABC to Infer about the Genetic History of Pygmy Hunter-Gatherers Populations from Western Central Africa, by A. Estoup, P. Verdu, J.-M. Marin, C. Robert, A. Dehne-Garcia, J.-M. Cornuet and P. Pudlo

French Econometrics [discussion]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on November 30, 2018 by xi'an

This Friday, I am briefly taking part in the 10th French Econometrics Conference as a discussant of Anna Simoni’s (CREST) talk, based on a paper co-written with Sid Chib and Minchul Shin. The conference is located at the Paris School of Economics (PSE), on Paris South End, in an impressive new building. The topic of the paper is a Bayesian empirical likelihood approach to the econometrics notion of moments model. Which I discussed here during ISBA last summer since Sid spoke (twice!) there.

easy-to-use empirical likelihood ABC

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on October 23, 2018 by xi'an

A newly arXived paper from a group of researchers at NUS I wish we had discussed when I was there last month. As we wrote this empirical ABCe paper in PNAS with Kerrie Mengersen and Pierre Pudlo in 2012. Plus the SAME paper with Arnaud Doucet and Simon Godsill ten years earlier, which the authors prefer to call data cloning in continuation of the more recent Lele et al. (2007). They could actually have used my original denomination of prior feedback (1992? I remember presenting the idea at Camp Casella in Cornell that summer) as well! Actually, I am not certain invoking prior feedback is quite necessary since this is a form of simulated method of moments as well.

Now, did we really assume that some moments of the distribution were analytically available, although the likelihood was not?! Even before going through the paper, it dawned on me that these theoretical moments could have been simulated instead, since the model is a generative one: for a given parameter value, a direct Monte Carlo approximation to the exact moment can be produced and can serve as a constraint for the empirical likelihood definition. I am surprised and aggrieved that we would not think of this empirical likelihood version of a method of moments. Which is central to the current paper. In the sense that, were the parameter exact, the differences between the moments based on the actual data x⁰ and the moments based on m replicas of the simulated data x¹,x²,… have mean zero, meaning the moment constraint is immediately available. Meaning an empirical likelihood is easily constructed, replacing the actual likelihood in an MCMC scheme, albeit at a rather high computing cost. Congratulations to the authors for uncovering this possibility that we missed!

“The summary statistics in this example were judiciously chosen.”

One point in the paper on which I disagree with the authors is the argument that MCMC sampling based on an empirical likelihood can be seen as an implementation of the pseudo-marginal Metropolis-Hastings method. The major difference in my opinion is that there is no unbiasedness here (and no generic result that indicates convergence to the exact posterior as the number of simulations grows to infinity). The other point unclear to me is about the selection of summaries [or moments] for implementing the method, which seems to be based on their performances in the subsequent estimation, performances that are hard to assess properly in intractable likelihood cases. In the last example of stereological extremes (not covered in our paper), for instance, the output is compared with the parallel synthetic likelihood result.

ISBA 18 tidbits

Posted in Books, Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 2, 2018 by xi'an

Among a continuous sequence of appealing sessions at this ISBA 2018 meeting [says a member of the scientific committee!], I happened to attend two talks [with a wee bit of overlap] by Sid Chib in two consecutive sessions, because his co-author Ana Simoni (CREST) was unfortunately sick. Their work was about models defined by a collection of moment conditions, as often happens in econometrics, developed in a recent JASA paper by Chib, Shin, and Simoni (2017). With an extension about moving to defining conditional expectations by use of a functional basis. The main approach relies on exponentially tilted empirical likelihoods, which reminded me of the empirical likelihood [BCel] implementation we ran with Kerrie Mengersen and Pierre Pudlo a few years ago. As a substitute to ABC. This problematic made me wonder on how much Bayesian the estimating equation concept is, as it should somewhat involve a nonparametric prior under the moment constraints.

Note that Sid’s [talks and] papers are disconnected from ABC, as everything comes in closed form, apart from the empirical likelihood derivation, as we actually found in our own work!, but this could become a substitute model for ABC uses. For instance, identifying the parameter θ of the model by identifying equations. Would that impose too much input from the modeller? I figure I came with this notion mostly because of the emphasis on proxy models the previous day at ABC in ‘burgh! Another connected item of interest in the work is the possibility of accounting for misspecification of these moment conditions by introducing a vector of errors with a spike & slab distribution, although I am not sure this is 100% necessary without getting further into the paper(s) [blame conference pressure on my time].

Another highlight was attending a fantastic poster session Monday night on computational methods except I would have needed four more hours to get through every and all posters. This new version of ISBA has split the posters between two sites (great) and themes (not so great!), while I would have preferred more sites covering all themes over all nights, to lower the noise (still bearable this year) and to increase the possibility to check all posters of interest in a particular theme…

Mentioning as well a great talk by Dan Roy about assessing deep learning performances by what he calls non-vacuous error bounds. Namely, through PAC-Bayesian bounds. One major comment of his was about deep learning models being much more non-parametric (number of parameters rising with number of observations) than parametric models, meaning that generative adversarial constructs as the one I discussed a few days ago may face a fundamental difficulty as models are taken at face value there.

On closed-form solutions, a closed-form Bayes factor for component selection in mixture models by Fũqene, Steel and Rossell that resemble the Savage-Dickey version, without the measure theoretic difficulties. But with non-local priors. And closed-form conjugate priors for the probit regression model, using unified skew-normal priors, as exhibited by Daniele Durante. Which are product of Normal cdfs and pdfs, and which allow for closed form marginal likelihoods and marginal posteriors as well. (The approach is not exactly conjugate as the prior and the posterior are not in the same family.)

And on the final session I attended, there were two talks on scalable MCMC, one on coresets, which will require some time and effort to assimilate, by Trevor Campbell and Tamara Broderick, and another one using Poisson subsampling. By Matias Quiroz and co-authors. Which did not completely convinced me (but this was the end of a long day…)

All in all, this has been a great edition of the ISBA meetings, if quite intense due to a non-stop schedule, with a very efficient organisation that made parallel sessions manageable and poster sessions back to a reasonable scale [although I did not once manage to cross the street to the other session]. Being in unreasonably sunny Edinburgh helped a lot obviously! I am a wee bit disappointed that no one else follows my call to wear a kilt, but I had low expectations to start with… And too bad I missed the Ironman 70.3 Edinburgh by one day!

at the Isaac Newton Institute [talks]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on July 7, 2017 by xi'an

Here are the slides I edited this week [from previous talks by Pierre and Epstein] for the INI Workshop on scalable inference, in connection with our recently completed and submitted paper on ABC with Wasserstein distances:

BimPressioNs [BNP11]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 29, 2017 by xi'an

While my participation to BNP 11 has so far been more at the janitor level [although not gaining George Casella’s reputation on NPR!] than at the scientific one, since we had decided in favour of the least expensive and unstaffed option for coffee breaks, to keep the registration fees at a minimum [although I would have gladly gone all the way to removing all coffee breaks!, if only because such breaks produce much garbage], I had fairly good chats at the second poster session, in particular around empirical likelihoods and HMC for discrete parameters, the first one based on the general Cressie-Read formulation and the second around the recently arXived paper of Nishimura et al., which I wanted to read. Plus many other good chats full stop, around terrific cheese platters!

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Best conference spread ever

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This morning, the coffee breaks were much more under control and I managed to enjoy [and chair] the entire session on empirical likelihood, with absolutely fantastic talks from Nils Hjort and Art Owen (the third speaker having gone AWOL, possibly a direct consequence of Trump’s travel ban).

fast ε-free ABC

Posted in Books, Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 8, 2017 by xi'an

Last Fall, George Papamakarios and Iain Murray from Edinburgh arXived an ABC paper on fast ε-free inference on simulation models with Bayesian conditional density estimation, paper that I missed. The idea there is to approximate the posterior density by maximising the likelihood associated with a parameterised family of distributions on θ, conditional on the associated x. The data being then the ABC reference table. The family chosen there is a mixture of K Gaussian components, which parameters are then estimated by a (Bayesian) neural network using x as input and θ as output. The parameter values are simulated from an adaptive proposal that aims at approximating the posterior better and better. As in population Monte Carlo, actually. Except for the neural network part, which I fail to understand why it makes a significant improvement when compared with EM solutions. The overall difficulty with this approach is that I do not see a way out of the curse of dimensionality: when the dimension of θ increases, the approximation to the posterior distribution of θ does deteriorate, even in the best of cases, as any other non-parametric resolution. It would have been of (further) interest to see a comparison with a most rudimentary approach, namely the one we proposed based on empirical likelihoods.