Archive for England

Warwick locks [jatp]

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2018 by xi'an


just in case your summer of British conferences is not yet fully-booked…

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 11, 2018 by xi'an

snapshot from Oxford [jatp]

Posted in pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , on April 21, 2018 by xi'an

guess what..?! Yet another worskhop in the endless summer Bayesian series!

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2018 by xi'an

Dennis Prangle pointed to me the perfectly timed i-like workshop taking place in Newcastle, on the days priors to ABC in Edinburgh and ISBA (similarly in Edinburgh!). (Note that Warwick is also part of the i-like network. Actually, the first i-like workshop was my first trip abroad after the Accident!) I may sound negative about these workshops, but on the opposite am quite a fan of them, just regretting that the main event did not take advantage of them all to reduce the volume of talks there. As I suggested, it could have been feasible to label these satellites as part of the main conference towards making speakers at these officially speakers at ISBA 2018 in case talks were required for support…

The i-like workshop 2018 is the sixth edition of a yearly series of workshops dedicated to the topic of intractable likelihoods, hosted by Newcastle University. The workshop will take place from Wednesday 20 June 2018 – Friday 22 June 2018 in Room 2.98, Armstrong Building, Newcastle upon Tyne. Registration is free and mandatory!

I spent a few days in Newcastle at the RSS meeting of 2013, with my friends Jim Hobert and Elias Moreno. Enjoying very much the city, its surroundings, the great meadow north of the city in a glorious sunset (I still bemoan not catching on camera!). And it is just in the vicinity of Hadrian’s Wall, just on the other side of the Borders, very close to Edinburgh in fact.

lecturer position in Data Centric Engineering and Statistics, Imperial College London

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 2, 2018 by xi'an

My friend and Warwick colleague Mark Girolami sent me this announcement for a permanent Lecturer position at Imperial [College London], funded by his recent research chair by the Royal Academy of Engineering (congrats, Mark!). Deadline is April 13, so hurry up!!!

 

postdoc position in London plus Seattle

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 21, 2018 by xi'an

Here is an announcement from Oliver Ratman for a postdoc position at Imperial College London with partners in Seattle, on epidemiology and new Bayesian methods for estimating sources of transmission with phylogenetics. As stressed by Ollie, no pre-requisites in phylogenetics are required, they are really looking for someone with solid foundations in Mathematics/Statistics, especially Bayesian Statistics, and good computing skills (R, github, MCMC, Stan). The search is officially for a Postdoc in Statistics and Pathogen Phylodynamics. Reference number is NS2017189LH. Deadline is April 07, 2018.

la belle sauvage [book review]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 25, 2018 by xi'an

Another book I brought back from Austin. And another deeply enjoyable one, although not the end of a trilogy of trilogies this time. This book, La Belle Sauvage, is first in a new trilogy by Philip Pullman that goes back to the early infancy of the hero of His Dark Materials, Lyra. Later volumes will take place after the first trilogy.

This is very much a novel about Oxford, to the point it sometimes seems written only for people with an Oxonian connection. After all, the author is living in Oxford… (Having the boat of the two characters passing by the [unnamed] department of Statistics at St. Giles carried away by the flood was a special sentence for me!)

Also, in continuation of His Dark Materials, a great steampunk universe, with a very oppressive Church and so far a limited used of magicks! Limited to the daemons, again in continuation with past volumes…

Now, some passages of the book remind me of Ishiguro’s buried giant, in the sense that the characters meeting myths from other stories may “really” meet them or instead dream. This is for instance the case when they accost at a property where an outworldy party is taking place and no-one is noticing them. Or when they meet a true giant that is a river deity, albeit not in the spirit of Ben Aaronovitch’s Rivers of London novels.

The story is written in the time honoured setup of teenager discovery travels, with not so much to discover as the whole country is covered by water. And the travel gets a wee bit boring after a while, with a wee bit too many coincidences, the inexplicable death (?) of a villain, and an hurried finale, where the reverse trip of the main characters takes a page rather than one book…

Trivia: La Belle Sauvage was also the name of the pub in Ludgate Hill where Pocahontas and her brother Tomocomo stayed when they first arrived in London. And The Trout is a true local pub, on the other side of Port Meadow [although I never managed to run that far in that direction while staying in St. Hugh, Oxford, last time, the meadow being flooded!].

Looking forward the second volume (already written, so no risk of The Name of the Wind or Game of Thrones quagmires, i.e., an endless wait for the next volume!), hoping the author keeps up the good work, the right tension in the story, and avoids by all means parallel universes, which were so annoying in the first trilogy! (I do remember loosing interest in the story during the second book and having trouble finishing the third one. I am not sure my son [who started before me] ever completed the trilogy…)