Archive for England

advanced computational methods for complex models in Biology [talk]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 29, 2016 by xi'an

St Pancras. London, Jan. 26, 2012

Here are the slides of the presentation I gave at the EPSRC Advanced Computational methods for complex models in Biology at University College London, last week. Introducing random forests as proper summaries for both model choice and parameter estimation (with considerable overlap with earlier slides, obviously!). The other talks of that highly interesting day on computational Biology were mostly about ancestral graphs, using Wright-Fisher diffusions for coalescents, plus a comparison of expectation-propagation and ABC on a genealogy model by Mark Beaumont and the decision theoretic approach to HMM order estimation by Chris Holmes. In addition, it gave me the opportunity to come back to the Department of Statistics at UCL more than twenty years after my previous visit, at a time when my friend Costas Goutis was still there. And to realise it had moved from its historical premises years ago. (I wonder what happened to the two staircases built to reduce frictions between Fisher and Pearson if I remember correctly…)

contemporary issues in hypothesis testing

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 26, 2016 by xi'an

hipocontemptThis week [at Warwick], among other things, I attended the CRiSM workshop on hypothesis testing, giving the same talk as at ISBA last June. There was a most interesting and unusual talk by Nick Chater (from Warwick) about the psychological aspects of hypothesis testing, namely about the unnatural features of an hypothesis in everyday life, i.e., how far this formalism stands from human psychological functioning.  Or what we know about it. And then my Warwick colleague Tom Nichols explained how his recent work on permutation tests for fMRIs, published in PNAS, testing hypotheses on what should be null if real data and getting a high rate of false positives, got the medical imaging community all up in arms due to over-simplified reports in the media questioning the validity of 15 years of research on fMRI and the related 40,000 papers! For instance, some of the headings questioned the entire research in the area. Or transformed a software bug missing the boundary effects into a major flaw.  (See this podcast on Not So Standard Deviations for a thoughtful discussion on the issue.) One conclusion of this story is to be wary of assertions when submitting a hot story to journals with a substantial non-scientific readership! The afternoon talks were equally exciting, with Andrew explaining to us live from New York why he hates hypothesis testing and prefers model building. With the birthday model as an example. And David Draper gave an encompassing talk about the distinctions between inference and decision, proposing a Jaynes information criterion and illustrating it on Mendel‘s historical [and massaged!] pea dataset. The next morning, Jim Berger gave an overview on the frequentist properties of the Bayes factor, with in particular a novel [to me] upper bound on the Bayes factor associated with a p-value (Sellke, Bayarri and Berger, 2001)

B¹⁰(p) ≤ 1/-e p log p

with the specificity that B¹⁰(p) is not testing the original hypothesis [problem] but a substitute where the null is the hypothesis that p is uniformly distributed, versus a non-parametric alternative that p is more concentrated near zero. This reminded me of our PNAS paper on the impact of summary statistics upon Bayes factors. And of some forgotten reference studying Bayesian inference based solely on the p-value… It is too bad I had to rush back to Paris, as this made me miss the last talks of this fantastic workshop centred on maybe the most important aspect of statistics!

and another position in Oxford

Posted in Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , on July 20, 2016 by xi'an

St. Edmund Hall, Oxford, Feb. 01, 2016After a position in Bristol advertised a few days ago, I want to point out there also is a position opening in Oxford, Department of Statistics, in conjunction with a fellowship from University College. The deadline is August 26, 2016, and applicants should contact Professor Arnaud Doucet for details.

position in Bristol

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , on July 19, 2016 by xi'an

Clifton Bridge, Bristol, Sept. 24, 2012There is an opening for a Lecturer (i.e., assistant/associate professor) position in Statistical Science at the University of Bristol (School of Mathematics) with deadline August 7. Please contact Professor Christophe Andrieu for more details.

London calling….

Posted in pictures with tags , , , , , , on June 24, 2016 by xi'an

The Day After… Most sadly, England massively voted against remaining in the EU, while Scotland even more massively supported the Remain option.

Avon river

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2016 by xi'an

bridge upon the Avon river, Stoneleigh, Warwickshire, May 31, 2016

Stoneleigh Abbey

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel with tags , , , , , , on June 2, 2016 by xi'an