Archive for England

sorcerer to the Crown [book review]

Posted in Books, Kids with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 10, 2019 by xi'an

Sorcerer to the Crown is an historical fantasy book by Zen Cho I got into buying by reading a review linking most positively the novel to the monumental Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell. Obviously I should have known better, given that Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell was several years in the making, with both a very convincing reconstitution of a 19th Century style and a fairly deep plot with fantastic historical connections that took me several reads (and the help of the BBC rendering) to completely understand. Nothing of the sort with this first book in the series, except for the acknowledged influence of Susanna Clarke’s novel. I started reading Sorcerer to the Crown wondering whether this was the young adult version of the other book, the parallel being almost obvious, from the decline of English magic to the Fairy Land accessible from a shrinking number of places, to the inhumanity (or rather a-humanity) of the King of the Fairies, to the old men ruling the magician society by being adverse to any sort of innovation. The attempts at differentiating the story from this illustrious predecessor are somewhat heavy-handed as the author tackles all at once race (the two main characters are African and Indian, respectively, and face discrimination, albeit far from the extent they would have been subjected to in the actual late 1700’s England), gender (magic is repressed in girls from the upper classes), class (see previous!), politics (the British Crown would like very much the help of magicians in fighting Napoléon), imperialism (as British links with India and Malaysia are shown to support local rulers towards gaining hold in these countries).  Once more, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell addresses these issues more subtly from Stephen Black‘s significant role in the story, to the equally major impact of Arabella Strange in the unraveling of her husband greatness, to the contributions of Jonathan Strange to the Napoleonic wars… This however made for a light travel read that I completed within a few days. Enjoying the dialogues more than the [rather uni-dimensional] characters and the low-intensity action scenes.

warm stone & cold morning light [jatp]

Posted in pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , on January 30, 2019 by xi'an

reading pile for X break

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 28, 2018 by xi'an

position in acturial stats at Warwick

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , on October 30, 2018 by xi'an

The Department of Statistics at the University of Warwick is seeking to appoint an Associate Professor to teach on the actuarial curriculum of our degree courses and to lead on its development. It welcomes candidates with experience in Actuarial Science in the Higher Education sector or commercial actuarial roles. There are two options when applying for this vacancy as Associate Professor – the teaching focused career path or the research & teaching focused career path. Check the specifics on the University HR page. Deadline is November 30, 2018.

BNP12

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 9, 2018 by xi'an

The next BNP (Bayesian nonparametric) conference is taking place in Oxford (UK), prior to the O’Bayes 2019 conference in Warwick, in June 24-28 and June 29-July 2, respectively. At this stage, the Scientific Committee of BNP12 invites submissions for possible contributed talks. The deadline for submitting a title/abstract is 15th December 2018. And the submission of applications for travel support closes on 15th December 2018. Currently, there are 35 awards that could be either travel awards or accommodation awards. The support is for junior researchers (students currently enrolled in a Dphil (PhD) programme or having graduated after 1st October 2015). The applicant agrees to present her/his work at the conference as a poster or oraly if awarded the travel support.

As for O’Bayes 2019, we are currently composing the programme, following the 20 years tradition of these O’Bayes meetings of having the Scientific Committee (Marilena Barbieri, Ed George, Brunero Liseo, Luis Pericchi, Judith Rousseau and myself) inviting about 25 speakers to present their recent work and 25 discussants to… discuss these works. With a first day of introductory tutorials to Bayes, O’Bayes and beyond. I (successfully) proposed this date and location to the O’Bayes board to take advantage of the nonparametric Bayes community present in the vicinity so that they could attend both meetings at limited cost and carbon impact.

abseiling down Coventry cathedral

Posted in Mountains, pictures, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 8, 2018 by xi'an

rather dull, if rother weird… [book review]

Posted in Books, Kids, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 1, 2018 by xi'an

A book that I grabbed in Waterstones, Brussels, on a quick dash between two meetings. And which presumably attracted me because of the superficial [watery] similarity with the book series Rivers of London, which setting and style I like quite a lot. Or, one can always dream on, a light version of Jonathan Strange & Mr. NorrellRotherweird is the first book in a trilogy by Andrew Caldecott, taking place in a sort of time space hole in (very) rural England, the river Rother being a true river in South-East England, near Hastings, but this first book does not put me in a particularly eager mood to seek the next volumes, as I find the story, the plot, the characters, and the settings all quite disappointing. Maybe having a truly parallel universe does not help (although it worked pretty well with Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell!). Having a boarding school with weird teachers does not either, as they are never exhibited as particularly competent in their own field and as students are absolutely invisible in the novel, while supposed to be the brightest in the whole of England. (Which makes a comparison with Harry Potter megalogy pointless.) Having this town of Rotherweird stuck in a rather indefinite time (and banning any attempt at history) could have been a great start but characters are very shallow, despite some funny lines, and do not contribute to make the universe more conceivable, just the opposite. Without indulging in spoilers, the final resolution is very very unconvincing.