Archive for evidence

round-table on Bayes[ian[ism]]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 7, 2017 by xi'an

In a [sort of] coincidence, shortly after writing my review on Le bayésianisme aujourd’hui, I got invited by the book editor, Isabelle Drouet, to take part in a round-table on Bayesianism in La Sorbonne. Which constituted the first seminar in the monthly series of the séminaire “Probabilités, Décision, Incertitude”. Invitation that I accepted and honoured by taking place in this public debate (if not dispute) on all [or most] things Bayes. Along with Paul Egré (CNRS, Institut Jean Nicod) and Pascal Pernot (CNRS, Laboratoire de chimie physique). And without a neuroscientist, who could not or would not attend.

While nothing earthshaking came out of the seminar, and certainly not from me!, it was interesting to hear of the perspectives of my philosophy+psychology and chemistry colleagues, the former explaining his path from classical to Bayesian testing—while mentioning trying to read the book Statistical rethinking reviewed a few months ago—and the later the difficulty to teach both colleagues and students the need for an assessment of uncertainty in measurements. And alluding to GUM, developed by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures I visited last year. I tried to present my relativity viewpoints on the [relative] nature of the prior, to avoid the usual morass of debates on the nature and subjectivity of the prior, tried to explain Bayesian posteriors via ABC, mentioned examples from The Theorem that Would not Die, yet untranslated into French, and expressed reserves about the glorious future of Bayesian statistics as we know it. This seminar was fairly enjoyable, with none of the stress induced by the constraints of a radio-show. Just too bad it did not attract a wider audience!

le bayésianisme aujourd’hui [book review]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 4, 2017 by xi'an

It is quite rare to see a book published in French about Bayesian statistics and even rarer to find one that connects philosophy of science, foundations of probability, statistics, and applications in neurosciences and artificial intelligence. Le bayésianisme aujourd’hui (Bayesianism today) was edited by Isabelle Drouet, a Reader in Philosophy at La Sorbonne. And includes a chapter of mine on the basics of Bayesian inference (à la Bayesian Choice), written in French like the rest of the book.

The title of the book is rather surprising (to me) as I had never heard the term Bayesianism mentioned before. As shown by this link, the term apparently exists. (Even though I dislike the sound of it!) The notion is one of a probabilistic structure of knowledge and learning, à la Poincaré. As described in the beginning of the book. But I fear the arguments minimising the subjectivity of the Bayesian approach should not be advanced, following my new stance on the relativity of probabilistic statements, if only because they are defensive and open the path all too easily to counterarguments. Similarly, the argument according to which the “Big Data” era makesp the impact of the prior negligible and paradoxically justifies the use of Bayesian methods is limited to the case of little Big Data, i.e., when the observations are more or less iid with a limited number of parameters. Not when the number of parameters explodes. Another set of arguments that I find both more modern and compelling [for being modern is not necessarily a plus!] is the ease with which the Bayesian framework allows for integrative and cooperative learning. Along with its ultimate modularity, since each component of the learning mechanism can be extracted and replaced with an alternative. Continue reading

nested sampling for philogenies

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on March 3, 2017 by xi'an

“Methods to estimate the marginal likelihood should be sensitive to the prior choice. Non-informative priors should increase the contribution of low-likelihood regions of parameter space in the estimated marginal likelihood. Consequently, the prior choice should affect the estimated evidence.”

 In a most recent arXival, Maturana, Brewer, and Klaere discuss of the appeal of nested sampling for conducting model choice in philogenetic models. In comparison with the “generalized steppingstone sampling” method, which represents the evidence as a product of ratios of evidences (Fan et al., 2011). And which I do not think I have previously met, with all references provided therein relating to Bayesian philogenetics, apparently. The stepping stone approach relies on a sequence of tempered targets, moving from a reference distribution to the real target as a temperature β goes from zero to one. (The paper also mentions thermodynamic integration as too costly.) Nested sampling—much discussed on this blog!—is presented in this paper as having the ability to deal with partly convex likelihoods, although I do not really get how or why. (As there is nothing new in the fairly pedagogical pretentation of nested sampling therein.) Nothing appears to be mentioned about the difficulty to handle multimodal as high likelihood isolated regions are unlikely to be sampled from poorly weighted priors (by which I mean that a region with significant likelihood mass is unlikely to get sampled if the prior distribution gives little prior weight to that region). The novelty in the paper is to compare nested sampling with generalized steppingstone sampling and path sampling on several phylogenetic examples. I did not spot computing time mentioned there. As usual with examples, my reservation is that the conclusions drawn for one particular analysis of one (three) particular example(s) does not convey a general method about the power and generality of a method. Even though I acknowledge that nested sampling is on principle operational in wide generality.

Bayesian model selection without evidence

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on September 20, 2016 by xi'an

“The new method circumvents the challenges associated with accurate evidence calculations by computing posterior odds ratios using Bayesian parameter estimation”

One paper leading to another, I had a look at Hee et al. 2015 paper on Bayes factor estimation. The “novelty” stands in introducing the model index as an extra parameter in a single model encompassing all models under comparison, the “new” parameterisation being in (θ,n) rather than in θ. With the distinction that the parameter θ is now made of the union of all parameters across all models. Which reminds us very much of Carlin and Chib (1995) approach to the problem. (Peter Green in his Biometrika (1995) paper on reversible jump MCMC uses instead a direct sum of parameter spaces.) The authors indeed suggest simulating jointly (θ,n) in an MCMC or nested sampling scheme. Rather than being updated by arbitrary transforms as in Carlin and Chib (1995) the useless parameters from the other models are kept constant… The goal being to estimate P(n|D) the marginal posterior on the model index, aka the posterior probability of model n.

Now, I am quite not certain keeping the other parameter constants is a valid move: given a uniform prior on n and an equally uniform proposal, the acceptance probability simplifies into the regular Metropolis-Hastings ratio for model n. Hence the move is valid within model n. If not, I presume the previous pair (θ⁰,n⁰) is repeated. Wait!, actually, this is slightly more elaborate: if a new value of n, m, is proposed, then the acceptance ratio involves the posteriors for both n⁰ and m, possibly only the likelihoods when the proposal is the prior. So the move will directly depend on the likelihood ratio in this simplified case, which indicates the scheme could be correct after all. Except that this neglects the measure theoretic subtleties that led to reversible jump symmetry and hence makes me wonder. In other words, it follows exactly the same pattern as reversible jump without the constraints of the latter… Free lunch,  anyone?!

ABC by subset simulation

Posted in Books, Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 25, 2016 by xi'an

Last week, Vakilzadeh, Beck and Abrahamsson arXived a paper entitled “Using Approximate Bayesian Computation by Subset Simulation for Efficient Posterior Assessment of Dynamic State-Space Model Classes”. It follows an earlier paper by Beck and co-authors on ABC by subset simulation, paper that I did not read. The model of interest is a hidden Markov model with continuous components and covariates (input), e.g. a stochastic volatility model. There is however a catch in the definition of the model, namely that the observable part of the HMM includes an extra measurement error term linked with the tolerance level of the ABC algorithm. Error term that is dependent across time, the vector of errors being within a ball of radius ε. This reminds me of noisy ABC, obviously (and as acknowledged by the authors), but also of some ABC developments of Ajay Jasra and co-authors. Indeed, as in those papers, Vakilzadeh et al. use the raw data sequence to compute their tolerance neighbourhoods, which obviously bypasses the selection of a summary statistic [vector] but also may drown signal under noise for long enough series.

“In this study, we show that formulating a dynamical system as a general hierarchical state-space model enables us to independently estimate the model evidence for each model class.”

Subset simulation is a nested technique that produces a sequence of nested balls (and related tolerances) such that the conditional probability to be in the next ball given the previous one remains large enough. Requiring a new round of simulation each time. This is somewhat reminding me of nested sampling, even though the two methods differ. For subset simulation, estimating the level probabilities means that there also exists a converging (and even unbiased!) estimator for the evidence associated with different tolerance levels. Which is not a particularly natural object unless one wants to turn it into a tolerance selection principle, which would be quite a novel perspective. But not one adopted in the paper, seemingly. Given that the application section truly compares models I must have missed something there. (Blame the long flight from San Francisco to Sydney!) Interestingly, the different models as in Table 4 relate to different tolerance levels, which may be an hindrance for the overall validation of the method.

I find the subsequent part on getting rid of uncertain prediction error model parameters of lesser [personal] interest as it essentially replaces the marginal posterior on the parameters of interest by a BIC approximation, with the unsurprising conclusion that “the prior distribution of the nuisance parameter cancels out”.

CRiSM workshop on estimating constants [slides]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2016 by xi'an

A short announcement that the slides of almost all talks at the CRiSM workshop on estimating constants last April 20-22 are now available. Enjoy (and dicuss)!

CRiSM workshop on estimating constants [#2]

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 31, 2016 by xi'an

The schedule for the CRiSM workshop on estimating constants that Nial Friel, Helen Ogden and myself host next April 20-22 at the University of Warwick is now set as follows. (The plain registration fees are £40 and accommodation on the campus is available through the online form.)

April 20, 2016
11:45 — 12:30: Adam Johansen
12:30 — 14:00: Lunch
14:00 — 14:45: Anne-Marie Lyne
14:45 — 15:30: Pierre Jacob
15:30 — 16:00: Break
16:00 — 16:45: Roberto Trotta
17:00 — 18:00: ‘Elevator’ talks
18:00 — 20:00: Poster session, Cheese and wine

April 21, 2016
9:00 — 9:45: Michael Betancourt
9:45 — 10:30: Nicolas Chopin
10:30 — 11:00: Coffee break
11:00 — 11:45: Merrilee Hurn
11:45 — 12:30: Jean-Michel Marin
12:30 — 14:00: Lunch
14:00 — 14:45: Sumit Mukherjee
14:45 — 15:30: Yves Atchadé
15:30 — 16:00: Break
16:00 — 16:45: Michael Gutmann
16:45 — 17:30: Panayiota Touloupou
19:00 — 22:00: Dinner

April 22, 2016
9:00 — 9:45: Chris Sherlock
9:45 — 10:30: Christophe Andrieu
10:30 — 11:00: Coffee break
11:00 — 11:45: Antonietta Mira