Archive for financial crisis

someone to watch over me [Horfðu á mig]

Posted in Books, Travel with tags , , , , , , on September 20, 2014 by xi'an

And yet another roman noir taking place in Iceland! My bedside read over the past two months was “Someone to watch over me” by Yrsa Sigurðardóttir. (It took that long because I was mostly away in July and August, not because the book was boring me to sleep every night!) It is a fairly unusual book in several respects: the setting is an institution for mentally handicapped patients that was set on fire, killing five of the patients as a result, the investigator is an Icelandic lawyer, Þóra Guðmundsdóttir, along with her German unemployed-banker boyfriend, the action takes place at the height [or bottom!] of the Icelandic [and beyond!] economic crisis, when most divorce settlements are about splitting the debts of the household, and when replacing a computer becomes an issue, some of the protagonists, including the main suspects, are mentally ill, and the police and justice are strangely absent from most of the story. The the book tells a lot about the Icelandic society, where a hit-and-run is so unheard of that the police is clueless. Or seems to be. And where people see ghosts. Or think they do, as the author plays (heavily?) on the uncertainty about those ghosts. (At least, there are no elves. Nor trolls.) Definitely more in tune with the “true” Iceland than Available dark. (Well, as far as I can tell!) The mystery itself is a wee bit stretched and the final resolution slightly disappointing, implying some unlikely behaviour from the major characters. In particular, I do not buy the explanation motivating the arson itself. Terrible cover too. And not a great title in English (Watch me or Look at me would have been better) given the many books, movies and songs with the same title. Nonetheless, I liked very much the overall atmosphere of the book, enough to recommend it.

17 equations that changed the World (#2)

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 16, 2012 by xi'an

(continuation of the book review)

If you placed your finger at that point, the two halves of the string would still be able to vibrate in the sin 2x pattern, but not in the sin x one. This explains the Pythagorean discovery that a string half as long produced a note one octave higher.” (p.143)

The following chapters are all about Physics: the wave equation, Fourier’s transform and the heat equation, Navier-Stokes’ equation(s), Maxwell’s equation(s)—as in  The universe in zero word—, the second law of thermodynamics, E=mc² (of course!), and Schrödinger’s equation. I won’t go so much into details for those chapters, even though they are remarkably written. For instance, the chapter on waves made me understand the notion of harmonics in a much more intuitive and lasting way than previous readings. (This chapter 8 also mentions the “English mathematician Harold Jeffreys“, while Jeffreys was primarily a geophysicist. And a Bayesian statistician with major impact on the field, his Theory of Probability arguably being the first modern Bayesian book. Interestingly, Jeffreys also was the first one to find approximations to the Schrödinger’s equation, however he is not mentioned in this later chapter.) Chapter 9 mentions the heat equation but is truly about Fourier’s transform which he uses as a tool and later became a universal technique. It also covers Lebesgue’s integration theory, wavelets, and JPEG compression. Chapter 10 on Navier-Stokes’ equation also mentions climate sciences, where it takes a (reasonable) stand. Chapter 11 on Maxwell’s equations is a short introduction to electromagnetism, with radio the obvious illustration. (Maybe not the best chapter in the book.) Continue reading