Archive for Fortran

a jump back in time

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 1, 2018 by xi'an

As the Department of Statistics in Warwick is slowly emptying its shelves and offices for the big migration to the new building that is almost completed, books and documents are abandoned in the corridors and the work spaces. On this occasion, I thus happened to spot a vintage edition of the Valencia 3 proceedings. I had missed this meeting and hence the volume for, during the last year of my PhD, I was drafted in the French Navy and as a result prohibited to travel abroad. (Although on reflection I could have safely done it with no one in the military the wiser!) Reading through the papers thirty years later is a weird experience, as I do not remember most of the papers, the exception being the mixture modelling paper by José Bernardo and Javier Giròn which I studied a few years later when writing the mixture estimation and simulation paper with Jean Diebolt. And then again in our much more recent non-informative paper with Clara Grazian.  And Prem Goel’s survey of Bayesian software. That is, 1987 state of the art software. Covering an amazing eighteen list. Including versions by Zellner, Tierney, Schervish, Smith [but no MCMC], Jaynes, Goldstein, Geweke, van Dijk, Bauwens, which apparently did not survive the ages till now. Most were in Fortran but S was also mentioned. And another version of Tierney, Kass and Kadane on Laplace approximations. And the reference paper of Dennis Lindley [who was already retired from UCL at that time!] on the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. And another paper by Don Rubin on using SIR (Rubin, 1983) for simulating from posterior distributions with missing data. Ten years before the particle filter paper, and apparently missing the possibility of weights with infinite variance.

There already were some illustrations of Bayesian analysis in action, including one by Jay Kadane reproduced in his book. And several papers by Jim Berger, Tony O’Hagan, Luis Pericchi and others on imprecise Bayesian modelling, which was in tune with the era, the imprecise probability book by Peter Walley about to appear. And a paper by Shaw on numerical integration that mentioned quasi-random methods. Applied to a 12 component Normal mixture.Overall, a much less theoretical content than I would have expected. And nothing about shrinkage estimators, although a fraction of the speakers had worked on this topic most recently.

At a less fundamental level, this was a time when LaTeX was becoming a standard, as shown by a few papers in the volume (and as I was to find when visiting Purdue the year after), even though most were still typed on a typewriter, including a manuscript addition by Dennis Lindley. And Warwick appeared as a Bayesian hotpot!, with at least five papers written by people there permanently or on a long term visit. (In case a local is interested in it, I have kept the volume, to be found in my new office!)

Sobol’s Monte Carlo

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2016 by xi'an

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The name of Ilya Sobol is familiar to researchers in quasi-Monte Carlo methods for his Sobol’s sequences. I was thus surprised to find in my office a small book entitled The Monte Carlo Method by this author, which is a translation of his 1968 book in Russian. I have no idea how it reached my office and I went to check with the library of Paris-Dauphine around the corner [of my corridor] whether it had been lost: apparently, the library got rid of it among a collection of old books… Now, having read through this 67 pages book (or booklet as Sobol puts it) makes me somewhat agree with the librarians, in that there is nothing of major relevance in this short introduction. It is quite interesting to go through the book and see the basics of simulation principles and Monte Carlo techniques unfolding, from the inverse cdf principle [established by a rather convoluted proof] to importance sampling, but the amount of information is about equivalent to the Wikipedia entry on the topic. From an historical perspective, it is also captivating to see the efforts to connect physical random generators (such as those based on vacuum tube noise) to shift-register pseudo-random generators created by Sobol in 1958. On a Soviet Strela computer.

While Googling the title of that book could not provide any connection, I found out that a 1994 version had been published under the title of A Primer for the Monte Carlo Method, which is mostly the same as my version, except for a few additional sections on pseudo-random generation, from the congruential method (with a FORTRAN code) to the accept-reject method being then called von Neumann’s instead of Neyman’s, to the notion of constructive dimension of a simulation technique, which amounts to demarginalisation, to quasi-Monte Carlo [for three pages]. A funny side note is that the author notes in the preface that the first translation [now in my office] was published without his permission!

Extending R

Posted in Books, Kids, R, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 13, 2016 by xi'an

As I was previously unaware of this book coming up, my surprise and excitement were both extreme when I received it from CRC Press a few weeks ago! John Chambers, one of the fathers of S, precursor of R, had just published a book about extending R. It covers some reflections of the author on programming and the story of R (Parts 2 and 1),  and then focus on object-oriented programming (Part 3) and the interfaces from R to other languages (Part 4). While this is “only” a programming book, and thus not strictly appealing to statisticians, reading one of the original actors’ thoughts on the past, present, and future of R is simply fantastic!!! And John Chambers is definitely not calling to simply start over and build something better, as Ross Ihaka did in this [most read] post a few years ago. (It is also great to see the names of friends appearing at times, like Julie, Luke, and Duncan!)

“I wrote most of the original software for S3 methods, which were useful for their application, in the early 1990s.”

In the (hi)story part, Chambers delves into the details of the evolution of S at Bells Labs, as described in his [first]  “blue book” (which I kept on my shelf until very recently, next to the “white book“!) and of the occurrence of R in the mid-1990s. I find those sections fascinating maybe the more because I am somewhat of a contemporary, having first learned Fortran (and Pascal) in the mid-1980’s, before moving in the early 1990s to C (that I mostly coded as translated Pascal!), S-plus and eventually R, in conjunction with a (forced) migration from Unix to Linux, as my local computer managers abandoned Unix and mainframe in favour of some virtual Windows machines. And as I started running R on laptops with the help of friends more skilled than I (again keeping some of the early R manuals on my shelf until recently). Maybe one of the most surprising things about those reminiscences is that the very first version of R was dated Feb 29, 2000! Not because of Feb 29, 2000 (which, as Chambers points out, is the first use of the third-order correction to the Gregorian calendar, although I would have thought 1600 was the first one), but because I would have thought it appeared earlier, in conjunction with my first Linux laptop, but this memory is alas getting too vague!

As indicated above, the book is mostly about programming, which means in my case that some sections are definitely beyond my reach! For instance, reading “the onus is on the person writing the calling function to avoid using a reference object as the argument to an existing function that expects a named list” is not immediately clear… Nonetheless, most sections are readable [at my level] and enlightening about the mottoes “everything that exists is an object” and “everything that happens is a function” repeated throughout.  (And about my psycho-rigid ways of translating Pascal into every other language!) I obviously learned about new commands and notions, like the difference between

x <- 3

and

x <<- 3

(but I was disappointed to learn that the number of <‘s was not related with the depth or height of the allocation!) In particular, I found the part about replacement fascinating, explaining how a command like

diag(x)[i] = 3

could modify x directly. (While definitely worth reading, the chapter on R packages could have benefited from more details. But as Chambers points out there are whole books about this.) Overall, I am afraid the book will not improve my (limited) way of programming in R but I definitely recommend it to anyone even moderately skilled in the language.

can we trust computer simulations?

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 10, 2015 by xi'an

lion

How can one validate the outcome of a validation model? Or can we even imagine validation of this outcome? This was the starting question for the conference I attended in Hannover. Which obviously engaged me to the utmost. Relating to some past experiences like advising a student working on accelerated tests for fighter electronics. And failing to agree with him on validating a model to turn those accelerated tests within a realistic setting. Or reviewing this book on climate simulation three years ago while visiting Monash University. Since I discuss in details below most talks of the day, here is an opportunity to opt away! Continue reading

modern but no TeX nor pdf

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , on December 12, 2012 by xi'an

I happened to come across the webpage of the Journal of Modern Applied Statistical Methods (the very first time I had encountered this journal). And saw the following announcement:

Authors interested in submitting a manuscript to JMASM should follow these guidelines. Note: Submissions in Tex and .pdf are NOT acceptable.

Meaning that only MS Word manuscripts are acceptable… Sounds to me to be a bit contradictory with the “Modern” in the title, no?, unless the Modern stands for fonts! (The code used as a graphical theme for the journal heading seems to be Fortran, which also has difficulties to fit this Modern qualification.)

Julien on R shortcomings

Posted in Books, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on September 8, 2010 by xi'an

Julien Cornebise posted a rather detailed set of comments (from Jasper!) that I thought was interesting and thought-provoking enough (!) to promote to a guest post. Here it is , then, to keep the debate rolling (with my only censoring being the removal of smileys!). (Please keep in mind that I do not endorse everything stated in this guest post! Especially the point on “Use R!“)

On C vs R
As a reply to Duncan: indeed C (at least for the bottlenecks) will probably always be faster for the final, mainstream use of an algorithm [e.g. as a distributed R library, or a standalone program]. Machine-level, smart compilers, etc etc. The same goes for Matlab, and even for Python: e.g. Pierre Jacob (Xian’s great PhD student) uses Weave to inline C in his Python code for the bottlenecks — simple, and fast. Some hedge funds even hire coders to recode the Matlab code of their consulting academic statisticians.

Point taken. But, as Radford Neal points out, that doesn’t justify R to be much slower that it could be:

  • When statisticians (cf Xian) want to develop/prototype new algorithms and methods while focussing on the math/stat/algo more than on the language-dependent implementation, it is still a shame to waste 50% (or even 25%). Same goes for the memory management, or even for some language features[1]
  • Even less computer-savvy users of R for real-case data, willing to use existing algorithms (not developing new algos) but on big/intricate datasets can be put off by slow speed — or even by memory failures.
  • And the library is BRILLIANT.

On Future Language vs R
Thanks David and Martyn for the link to Ihaka’s great paper on R-like lisp-based. Says things better than I could, and with an expertise on R that I haven’t. I also didn’t know about Robert Gentleman and his success at Harvard (but he *invented* the thing, not merely tuned it up).

Developing a whole new language and concept, as advocated in Ihaka’s paper and as suggested by gappy3000 would be a great leap forward, and a needed breakthrough to change the way we use computational stats. I would *love* to see that, as I personally think (as Ihaka advocates in the paper you link to) that R, as a language, is a hell of a pain [2] and I am saddened to see a lot of “Use R” books who will root its inadequate use for needs where the language hardly fits the bill — although the library does.

But R is here and in everyday use, and the matter is more of making it worth using, to its full potential. I have no special attachment to R, but any breakthrough language that would not be entirely compatible with the massive library contributed over the years would be doomed to fail to pick-up the everyday statistician—and we’re talking here about far-fetched long-term moves. Sanitary breakthrough, but harder to make happen when such an anchor is here.
I would say that R has turned into the Fortran of statistics: here to stay, anchored by the inertia that stems from its intrinsic (and widely acknowledged) merits  (I’ve been nice, I didn’t say Cobol.).

So until of the great leap forward comes (or until we make it happen as a community), I second Radford Neal‘s call for optimization of the existing core of R.

Rejoinder
As a rejoinder to the comments here, I think we need to consider separately

  1. R’s brilliant library
  2. R’s not-so-brilliant language and/or interpreter.

It seems to me from this topic that the community needs/should push for, in chronological order.

  1. First, a speed-up of R’s existing interpreter as called for by Radford Neal.  “Easy” and short-term task, by good-willing amateur coders, or, better, by solid CS people.
  2. Team-up with CS experts interested in developing computational stat-related tools.
  3. With them, get out of the now dead-ended R language and embark on a new stat framework based on an *existing*, proven, language. *Must*  be able to reuse the brilliant R library/codes brought up by the community. Failing so would fail to pick up the userbase = die in limbo.  That’s more or less what is called for by Ihaka (except for his doubts on the backward compatibility, see Section 7 of his paper).  Much harder and longer term, but worth it.

From then on
Who knows the R community enough to relay this call, and make it happen ? I’m out of my league.

Uninteresting footnotes:
[1] I have twitched several times when trying R, feeling the coding was somewhat unnatural from a CS point of view. [Mind, I twitch all the same, although on other points, with Matlab]
[2] again, I speak only out of the few tries I gave it, as I gave up using it for my everyday work, I am biased — and ignorant

Neal

Computational Statistics

Posted in Books, R, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 10, 2010 by xi'an

Do not resort to Monte Carlo methods unnecessarily.

When I received this 2009 Springer-Verlag book, Computational Statistics, by James Gentle a while ago, I briefly took a look at the table of contents and decided to have a better look later… Now that I have gone through the whole book, I can write a short review on its scope and contents (to be submitted). Despite its title, the book aims at covering both computational statistics and statistical computing. (With 752 pages at his disposal, Gentle can afford to do both indeed!)

The book Computational Statistics is separated into four parts:

  • Part I: Mathematical and statistical preliminaries.
  • Part II: Statistical Computing (Computer storage and arithmetic.- Algorithms and programming.- Approximation of functions and numerical quadrature.- Numerical linear algebra.- Solution of nonlinear equations and optimization.- Generation of random numbers.)
  • Part III: Methods of Computational Statistics (Graphical methods in computational statistics.- Tools for identification of structure in data.- Estimation of functions.- Monte Carlo methods for statistical inference.- Data randomization, partitioning, and augmentation.- Bootstrap methods.)
  • Part IV: Exploring Data Density and Relationship (Estimation of probability density functions using parametric models.- Nonparametric estimation of probability density functions.- Statistical learning and data mining.- Statistical models of dependencies.)

Computational inference, together with exact inference and asymptotic inference, is an important component of statistical methods.

The first part of Computational Statistics is indeed a preliminary containing essentials of math and probability and statistics. A reader unfamiliar with too many topics within this chapter should first consider improving his or her background in the corresponding area! This is a rather large chapter, with 82 pages, and it should not be extremely useful to readers, except to signal deficiencies in their background, as noted above. Given this purpose, I am not certain the selected exercises of this chapter are necessary (especially when considering that some involve tools introduced much later in the book).

The form of a mathematical expression and the way the expression should be evaluated in actual practice may be quite different .

The second part of Computational Statistics is truly about computing, meaning the theory of computation, i.e. of using computers for numerical approximation, with discussions about the representation of numbers in computers, approximation errors, and of course random number generators. While I judge George Fishman’s Monte Carlo to provide a deeper and more complete coverage of those topics, I appreciate the need for reminding our students of those hardware subtleties as they often seem unaware of them, despite their advanced computer skills. This second part is thus a crash course of 250 pages on numerical methods (like function approximations by basis functions and …) and on random generators, i.e. cover the same ground as Gentle’s earlier books, Random Number Generation and Monte Carlo Methods and Numerical Linear Algebra for Applications in Statistics, while the more recent Elements of Computational Statistics looks very much like a shorter entry on the same topics as those of Parts III IV of Computational Statistics. This part could certainly sustain a whole semester undergraduate course while only advanced graduate students could be expected to gain from a self-study of those topics. It is nonetheless the most coherent and attractive part of the book. It constitutes a must-read for all students and researchers engaging into any kind of serious programming. Obviously, some notions are introduced a bit too superficially, given the scope of this section (as for instance Monte Carlo methods, in particular MCMC techniques that are introduced in less than six pages), but I came to realise this is the point of the book, which provides an entry into “all” necessary topics, along with links to the relevant literature (if missing Monte Carlo Statistical Methods!). I however deplore that the important issue of Monte Carlo experiments, whose construction is often a hardship for students, is postponed till the 100 page long appendix. (I suspect that students do not read appendices is another of those folk theorems!)

Monte Carlo methods differ from other methods of numerical analysis in yielding an estimate rather than an approximation.

The third and fourth parts of the book cover methods of computational statistics, including Monte Carlo methods, randomization and cross validation, the bootstrap, probability density estimation, and statistical learning. Unfortunately, I find the level of Part III to be quite uneven, where all chapters are short and rather superficial because they try to be all-encompassing. (For instance, Chapter 8 includes two pages on the RGB colour coding.) Part IV does a better job of presenting machine learning techniques, if not with the thoroughness of Hastie et al.’s The Elements of Statistical Learning: Data Mining, Inference, and Prediction… It seems to me that the relevant sections of Part III would have fitted better where they belong in Part IV. For instance, Chapter 10 on estimation of functions only covers the evaluation of estimators of functions, postponing the construction of those estimators till Chapter 15. Jackknife is introduced on its own in Chapter 12 (not that I find this introduction ultimately necessary) without the bootstrap covered in eight pages in Chapter 13 (bootstrap for non-iid data is dismissed rather quickly, given the current research in the area). The first chapter of Part IV covers some (non-Bayesian) estimation approaches for parametric families, but I find this chapter somehow superfluous as it does not belong to the computational statistic domain (except as an approximation method, as stressed in Section 14.4). While Chapter 16 is a valuable entry on clustering and data-analysis tools like PCA, the final section on high dimensions feels out of context (and mentioning the curse of dimensionality only that close to the end of the book does not seem appropriate). Chapter 17 on dependent data is missing the rich literature on graphical models and their use in the determination of dependence structures.

Programming is the best way to learn programming (read that again) .

In conclusion, Computational Statistics is a very diverse book that can be used at several levels as textbook, as well as a reference for researchers (even if as an entry towards further and deeper references). The book is well-written, in a lively and personal style. (I however object to the reduction of the notion of Markov chains to discrete state-spaces!) There is no requirement for a specific programming language, although R is introduced in a somewhat dismissive way (R most serious flaw is usually lack of robustness since some [packages] are not of high-quality) and some exercises start with Design and write either a C or a Fortran subroutine. BUGS is not mentioned at all. The appendices of Computational Statistics also contain the solutions to some exercises, even though the level of detail is highly variable, from one word (“1”) to one page (see, e.g., Exercise 11.4). The 20 page list of references is preceded by a few pages on available journals and webpages, which could get obsolete rather quickly. Despite the reservations raised above about some parts of Computational Statistics that would benefit from a deeper coverage, I think this book is a reference book that should appear in the shortlist of any computational statistics/statistical computing graduate course as well as on the shelves of any researcher supporting his or her statistical practice with a significant dose of computing backup.