Archive for France Inter

major confUSion

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , on November 19, 2016 by xi'an

crossing the Seine in RER C near Maison de la Radio, Nov. 09, 2012In a recent evening talk-show on France Inter, the French national public radio, the debate was about the [bad] surprise election of the donald and the fact that the media had missed the result, (self-)blaming a disconnection with the “real” country. One of the discussants, Julia Cagé, Professor of Economics at Science Po’, started the discussion with the amazing confusion [at 5’55”] between the probability that Hillary Clinton would win [evaluated at 84% on the last day] and the percentage of votes in her favour [which was around that figure in Manhattan]…

On a related if minor theme, my post on Flaxman et al.’s early [if preliminary] analysis of the said election got so many views that it became the most popular post for 2016! (If not competing with Ross Ihaka’s call to simply start over with R!)

And yet another related entry today in Libération, blaming the disastrous result partly on the social media and their algorithms (again!) that favour items of information (or dis-information) from the same perspective and do not rank those items by their reliability… The author of the tribune is an econometrician at Essec, but there is no methodological content in this ideological entry that seems to call for a super-monitor which would impose (how?) diversity and (which?) ranking on social media. A post-truth era, for sure! Shifting the blame from the deplorable voters themselves to anything else…

life and death along the RER B, minus approximations

Posted in Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 30, 2015 by xi'an

viemortrerbWhile cooking for a late Sunday lunch today [sweet-potatoes röstis], I was listening as usual to the French Public Radio (France Inter) and at some point heard the short [10mn] Périphéries that gives every weekend an insight on the suburbs [on the “other side’ of the Parisian Périphérique boulevard]. The idea proposed by a geographer from Montpellier, Emmanuel Vigneron, was to point out the health inequalities between the wealthy 5th arrondissement of Paris and the not-so-far-away suburbs, by following the RER B train line from Luxembourg to La Plaine-Stade de France…

The disparities between the heart of Paris and some suburbs are numerous and massive, actually the more one gets away from the lifeline represented by the RER A and RER B train lines, so far from me the idea of negating this opposition, but the presentation made during those 10 minutes of Périphéries was quite approximative in statistical terms. For instance, the mortality rate in La Plaine is 30% higher than the mortality rate in Luxembourg and this was translated into the chances for a given individual from La Plaine to die in the coming year are 30% higher than if he [or she] lives in Luxembourg. Then a few minutes later the chances for a given individual from Luxembourg to die are 30% lower than he [or she] lives in La Plaine…. Reading from the above map, it appears that the reference is the mortality rate for the Greater Paris. (Those are 2010 figures.) This opposition that Vigneron attributes to a different access to health facilities, like the number of medical general practitioners per inhabitant, does not account for the huge socio-demographic differences between both places, for instance the much younger and maybe larger population in suburbs like La Plaine. And for other confounding factors: see, e.g., the equally large difference between the neighbouring stations of Luxembourg and Saint-Michel. There is no socio-demographic difference and the accessibility of health services is about the same. Or the similar opposition between the southern suburban stops of Bagneux and [my local] Bourg-la-Reine, with the same access to health services… Or yet again the massive decrease in the Yvette valley near Orsay. The analysis is thus statistically poor and somewhat ideologically biased in that I am unsure the data discussed during this radio show tells us much more than the sad fact that suburbs with less favoured populations show a higher mortality rate.

another ultimate argument

Posted in Travel with tags , , , , , , on February 13, 2015 by xi'an

Yet another astounding argument by Gérard Longuet, who showed on France Inter last night on a debate about the Minsk agreement  that his perspective on history was as unusual as his views on genetics:

“En fait, il y a deux pays qui ont envahi la Russie, c’est la France et l’Allemagne…”

[Translation: In fact, there are only two countries that invaded Russia, France and Germany]. Missing the Polish-Moscovite War of 1605-1618 and the Swedish invasion of Russia in 1708-1709…

Mathematics on public radio

Posted in University life with tags , , , , , on September 5, 2010 by xi'an

Following the Field medals awarded to Cédric Villani (the head of IHP and a former Dauphine PhD, as our president quickly communicated about) and Ngô Bao Châu (formely at Orsay, now moving to Chicago a fact omitted on the local news!), the French public radio, France Inter, dedicated one of its evening phone debates (Le Telephone Sonne) to research in Mathematics. The panelists were Cédric Villani, Jean-Pierre Bourguignon (head of IHES), and Guy Métivier (head of Mathematics at CNRS). This actually happens rather often (i.e. more often than once every four years when a French mathematician gets a Field medal) and I came across several of those by happenstance. The exercise (explaining to the layman what is the meaning of doing research in Mathematics and what are the advances made by the medalists in the current case) is interesting if delicate as the temptations to get lyrical or technical abound! I found the panelists did a very good job last Wednesday night. (Note that Terry Tao gave a summary of the four panelists’ achievements on his blog.) A very sweet (and my preferred) question was whether or not mathematical objects/concepts have an existence of their own or are created in mathematicians’ minds. In linking pure and applied maths, ie stating that there was no frontier between the two and that pure mathematicians are often involved in fruitful applications, Cédric Villani even mentioned Statistics, which is nice even though I doubt there is the remotest chance a statistician could get the Field Medal. (Incidentally, the COPSS Award, which is the Field Medal of Statistics, was attributed to David Dunson, from Duke, last August. Well-deserved, David!)