Archive for France

postdoc on missing data at École Polytechnique

Posted in Kids, pictures, R, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on November 18, 2016 by xi'an

Julie Josse contacted me for advertising a postdoc position at École Polytechnique, in Palaiseau, south of Paris. “The fellowship is focusing on missing data. Interested graduates should apply as early as possible since the position will be filled when a suitable candidate is found. The Centre for Applied Mathematics (CMAP) is  looking for highly motivated individuals able to develop a general multiple imputation method for multivariate continuous and categorical variables and its implementation in the free R software. The successful candidate will be part of research group in the statistical team on missing values. The postdoc will also have excellent opportunities to collaborate with researcher in public health with partners on the analysis of a large register from the Paris Hospital (APHP) to model the decisions and events when severe trauma patients are handled by emergency doctors. Candidates should contact Julie Josse at polytechnique.edu.”

nuit de la philosophie

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, University life with tags , , , , on November 15, 2016 by xi'an

nuitphilo

Paris, l’an dernier…

Posted in Kids, pictures with tags , , , on November 13, 2016 by xi'an

In memoriam of that deadly night of November 13, 2015. The sun might be shining strong but no one is forgiven, the sky might be unblemished blue but nothing is forgotten.

À la Sorbonne

Posted in pictures, University life with tags , , , , , , , on November 3, 2016 by xi'an

iuf16This morning, in Sorbonne,  I attended the opening ceremony for the 26th promotion of l’Institut Universitaire de France (IUF), as I had the incredible chance of being nominated a senior member of this French virtual institute this Spring and for the incoming five academic years. (I had been nominated once already, from 2010 to 2015.) This institute is virtual in that its members remain in their home university, with a comfortable grant that buys teaching off and provides research support. This morning ceremony was mostly attended by the new members and the main event was a talk by Jules Hoffmann, Medicine Nobel Prize in 2011, who gave a very engaging talk in immunity and his work on the characterisation of immunity, first on flies and then on humans. The setting was the Grand Ampithéâtre of the historical Sorbonne building, only used now for academic ceremonies such as this one. (And also rented for private events…)

positions in French universities [deadline]

Posted in Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on October 21, 2016 by xi'an

Université Paris-DauphineFor ‘Og’s readers interested in lecturer or professor positions in French universities next academic year, including a lecturer position at Paris-Dauphine in applied and computational statistics!, you need to apply for a qualification label by a national committee which strict deadline is next Tuesday, October 25, at 4pm (Paris/CET time).  (The whole procedure is exclusively in French!)

The Magicians [#2]

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , on October 1, 2016 by xi'an

magicienIn a minor key coincidence with my book review last week, I spotted this advertising board on my métro platform this morning. Announcing the diffusion of the first season of The Magicians on the French SyFy [sic] channel. (Next to this board, a more relevant one from Droit au Logement.)

Le bayésianisme aujourd’hui

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on September 19, 2016 by xi'an

A few years ago, I was asked by Isabelle Drouet to contribute a chapter to a multi-disciplinary book on the Bayesian paradigm, book that is now soon to appear. In French. It has this rather ugly title of Bayesianism today. Not that I had hear of Bayesianism or bayésianime previously. There are chapters on the Bayesian notion(s) of probability, game theory, statistics, on applications, and on the (potentially) Bayesian structure of human intelligence. Most of it is thus outside statistics, but I will certainly read through it when I receive my copy.