Archive for French cheese

the invasion of the American cheeses

Posted in Travel, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , on October 15, 2018 by xi'an

Part of the new Nafta agreement between the USA and its neighbours, Canada and Mexico, is lifting restrictions on the export of American cheeses to these countries. Having tasted high quality cheeses from Québec on my last visit to Montréal, and having yet to find similar performances in a US cheese, I looked at the list of cheese involved in the agreement, only to discover a collection of European cheese that should be protected by AOC rules under EU regulations (and only attributed to cheeses produced in the original regions):

Brie [de Meaux or de Melun?]
Burrata [di Andria?]
Camembert [missing the de Normandie to be AOC]
Coulommiers [actually not AOC!]
Emmenthal [which should be AOC Emmentaler Switzerland!]
Pecorino [all five Italian varieties being PDO]
Provolone [both Italian versions being PDO]

Plus another imposition that British Columbia wines be no longer segregated from US wines in British Columbia! Which sounds somewhat absurd if wine like those from (BC) Okanagan Valley or (Washington) Walla Walla is to be enjoyed with some more subtlety than diet cokeOwning a winery apparently does not necessarily require such subtlety!

BimPressioNs [BNP11]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 29, 2017 by xi'an

While my participation to BNP 11 has so far been more at the janitor level [although not gaining George Casella’s reputation on NPR!] than at the scientific one, since we had decided in favour of the least expensive and unstaffed option for coffee breaks, to keep the registration fees at a minimum [although I would have gladly gone all the way to removing all coffee breaks!, if only because such breaks produce much garbage], I had fairly good chats at the second poster session, in particular around empirical likelihoods and HMC for discrete parameters, the first one based on the general Cressie-Read formulation and the second around the recently arXived paper of Nishimura et al., which I wanted to read. Plus many other good chats full stop, around terrific cheese platters!

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Best conference spread ever

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This morning, the coffee breaks were much more under control and I managed to enjoy [and chair] the entire session on empirical likelihood, with absolutely fantastic talks from Nils Hjort and Art Owen (the third speaker having gone AWOL, possibly a direct consequence of Trump’s travel ban).

speed seminar-ing

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2015 by xi'an

harbour in the morning, Carnon, June 15, 2012Yesterday, I  made a quick afternoon trip to Montpellier as replacement of a seminar speaker who had cancelled at the last minute. Most obviously, I gave a talk about our “testing as mixture” proposal. And as previously, the talk generated a fair amount of discussion and feedback from the audience. Providing me with additional aspects to include in a revision of the paper. Whether or not the current submission is rejected, new points made and received during those seminars will have to get in a revised version as they definitely add to the appeal to the perspective. In that seminar, most of the discussion concentrated on the connection with decisions based on such a tool as the posterior distribution of the mixture weight(s). My argument for sticking with the posterior rather than providing a hard decision rule was that the message is indeed in arguing hard rules that end up mimicking the p- or b-values. And the catastrophic consequences of fishing for significance and the like. Producing instead a validation by simulating under each model pseudo-samples shows what to expect for each model under comparison. The argument did not really convince Jean-Michel Marin, I am afraid! Another point he raised was that we could instead use a distribution on α with support {0,1}, to avoid the encompassing model he felt was too far from the original models. However, this leads back to the Bayes factor as the weights in 0 and 1 are the marginal likelihoods, nothing more. However, this perspective on the classical approach has at least the appeal of completely validating the use of improper priors on common (nuisance or not) parameters. Pierre Pudlo also wondered why we could not conduct an analysis on the mixture of the likelihoods. Instead of the likelihood of the mixture. My first answer was that there was not enough information in the data for estimating the weight(s). A few more seconds of reflection led me to the further argument that the posterior on α with support (0,1) would then be a mixture of Be(2,1) and Be(1,2) with weights the marginal likelihoods, again (under a uniform prior on α). So indeed not much to gain. A last point we discussed was the case of the evolution trees we analyse with population geneticists from the neighbourhood (and with ABC). Jean-Michel’s argument was that the scenari under comparison were not compatible with a mixture, the models being exclusive. My reply involved an admixture model that contained all scenarios as special cases. After a longer pondering, I think his objection was more about the non iid nature of the data. But the admixture construction remains valid. And makes a very strong case in favour of our approach, I believe.

masbruguiere2After the seminar, Christian Lavergne and Jean-Michel had organised a doubly exceptional wine-and-cheese party: first because it is not usually the case there is such a post-seminar party and second because they had chosen a terrific series of wines from the Mas Bruguière (Pic Saint-Loup) vineyards. Ending up with a great 2007 L’Arbouse. Perfect ending for an exciting day. (I am not even mentioning a special Livarot from close to my home-town!)