Archive for French politics

Drogue : sortir du tout-répressif [reposted]

Posted in Books, Kids, Travel, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 13, 2020 by xi'an

[Here is an editorial (my take at a Google translation) from Le Monde about the installment last week of a fixed fine of €200 for drug possession. Introduced in 2018 by the French Parliament, it is presented by the French government as a way to fight drug-trafficking (and its far reaching consequences in the (de)structuration of some suburbs) by turning consumers into de facto accomplices. Which I find counterproductive and irrational as prohibition never works and ultimately benefits criminals. Drug legalisation or at least drug decriminalisation, adopted in many other countries, would be much more beneficial. Disclaimer #1: I am not supporting the use of drugs, except tea of course. Disclaimer #2: I do not agree with the entirety of the editorial below.]

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voting inequalities in the US

Posted in Kids, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 8, 2020 by xi'an

“We’re the only advanced democracy that deliberately discourages people from voting.” Barack Obama

Following a poorly attended local election in France last weekend, over-interpreted by media and political analysts as usual, with poorer categories more likely to abstain, I reflected on the supplementary degree of voting inequality in the US, where active voter suppression and voting discrimination run uncontested by legislative and constitutional bodies. As it happens, even for federal elections, the election laws are state-based, voted by partisan state lawmakers and implemented by equally partisan officials.This means discriminating practices can become part of these laws, including different restrictions on acceptable forms of identification that poorer voters may be unable to purchase, restrictions on voter registration and in particular on active drives for minority registrations, discriminatory closures of voting (poll) places,  as e.g. a single voting place for 600,000 voters, meaning unreachable stations for those without transportation means and those housebound, abusive voter purges by local administrations, e.g., the Interstate Voter Registration Crosscheck System having 99% more chances to remove legitimate than illegitimate voters, lifelong felon disenfranchisement, including for citizens having completed their sentence, some places asking for on-the-spot proof of US citizenship, involving document poorer voters cannot access, mail-in voting discrimination, no worker protection for participating in the vote, which takes place during the week, grossly underfunded poll budgets, leading for instance to hour long polling queues and various mismanagement of the votes, the possibility for National Guard staffing poll stations, and the century long absurdity of gerrymandering, where something like 60 million Americans live in a place where the ruling party has received the minority of the votes in a state election. Not to mention the election by an electoral college of the president where the winner may lag by 3 million votes behind his contender… And running uncontested grossly misleading political adds

 

Cédric Villani on COVID-19 [and Zoom for the local COVID-19 seminar]

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 19, 2020 by xi'an

From the “start” of the COVID-19 crisis in France (or more accurately after lockdown on March 13), the math department at Paris-Dauphine has run an internal webinar around this crisis, not solely focusing on the math or stats aspects but also involving speakers from other domains, from epidemiology to sociology, to economics. The speaker today was [Field medalist then elected member of Parliament] Cédric Villani, as a member of the French Parliament sciences and technology committee, l’Office parlementaire d’évaluation des choix scientifiques et technologiques (OPECST), which adds its recommendations to those of the several committees advising the French government. The discussion was interesting as an insight on the political processing of the crisis and the difficulties caused by the heavy-handed French bureaucracy, which still required to fill form A-3-b6 in emergency situations. And the huge delays in launching a genuine survey of the range and diffusion of the epidemic. Which, as far as I understand, has not yet started….

Dauphine blocked for a few hours

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on March 14, 2020 by xi'an

LPPR or not?!

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , on March 12, 2020 by xi'an