Archive for Geoff McLachlan

finite mixture models [book review]

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2014 by xi'an

Here is a review of Finite Mixture Models (2000) by Geoff McLachlan & David Peel that I wrote aeons ago (circa 1999), supposedly for JASA, which lost first the files and second the will to publish it. As I was working with my student today, I mentioned the book to her and decided to publish it here, if only because I think the book deserved a positive review, even after all those years! (Since then, Sylvia Frühwirth-Schnatter published Finite Mixture and Markov Switching Models (2004), which is closer to my perspective on the topic and that I would more naturally recommend.)

Mixture modeling, that is, the use of weighted sums of standard distributions as in

\sum_{i=1}^k p_i f({\mathbf y};{\mathbf \theta}_i)\,,

is a widespread and increasingly used technique to overcome the rigidity of standard parametric distributions such as f(y;θ), while retaining a parametric nature, as exposed in the introduction of my JASA review to Böhning’s (1998) book on non-parametric mixture estimation (Robert, 2000). This review pointed out that, while there are many books available on the topic of mixture estimation, the unsurpassed reference remained the book by Titterington, Smith and Makov (1985)  [hereafter TSM]. I also suggested that a new edition of TSM would be quite timely, given the methodological and computational advances that took place in the past 15 years: while it remains unclear whether or not this new edition will ever take place, the book by McLachlan and Peel gives an enjoyable and fairly exhaustive update on the topic, incorporating the most recent advances on mixtures and some related models.

Geoff McLachlan has been a major actor in the field for at least 25 years, through papers, software—the book concludes with a review of existing software—and books: McLachlan (1992), McLachlan and Basford (1988), and McLachlan and Krishnan (1997). I refer the reader to Lindsay (1989) for a review of the second book, which is a forerunner of, and has much in common with, the present book. Continue reading