Archive for Harry Hole

Flaggermusmannen [book review]

Posted in Books, Kids, Travel with tags , , , , , , on May 25, 2014 by xi'an

“Cold, concise statistics. Keyword number one is statistical significance. In other words, we are looking for a system that cannot be explained by statistical chance (…) this group constitutes less than five percent of the female population. Yet I was left with seven murders and over forty rapes.” J. Nesbø

Another first novel! The Bat (Flaggermusmannen) by  Jo Nesbø has been sitting in my bedside book pile for quite a while, until I decided to read it a few days ago. It is the first appearance of Inspector Harry Hole in a published book and was written in 1997, although translated into English much much later. (The book was nominated as Best Norwegian Crime Novel of the Year and as Best Nordic Crime Novel of the Year.)

“Life consists of a series of quite improbable chance occurrences (…) What bothers me is that I’ve got that lottery number too many times in a row.” J. Nesbø

I read the (later) novel The Redeemer a few years ago, taking place mostly in Norway and kept a globally positive impression about the book, even though the plot was a bit stretched… The Bat has somewhat the same defects as The Ice Princess in that it sounds too much like an exercise in thriller writing, albeit in a much less clumsy style! The central character of Harry Hole is well-done, in an engaging-despite-his-shortcomings style and the way he gets along with most of the people he meets is rather realistic. However, the setting of the first novel in Australia (rather than Norway) is sort of a failure in that the country and Sydney are more caricatures than realistic in any degree…. For instance, every aboriginal Harry meets must resort to traditional tales involving emus and lizards and other local animals. One such tale would be ok but so many are just a bore. The title itself is connected to yet another aboriginal myth. And to the murders occurring way too often in the novel. Similarly, every foreign backpacker met in the pages of The Bat is either dumb or on her way to become a waitress to recover from a failed love affair. And a major character is a transvestite playing in a theatre, maybe because Nesbø has watched Priscilla Queen of the Desert a few years earlier… And the Australian police officers sound both very heavy in colloquialism and quite light in detective skills. Lacking an obvious connection to a series of young women murders throughout Australia. The second part of the novel gets too artificial to remain gripping and I completed the book with a feeling of chore accomplished…, not of surprise or shock at the resolution of the murders. I thus concur with many other readers of the book that it is certainly far from being the best in the series!