Archive for HPD region

an arithmetic mean identity

Posted in Books, pictures, R, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 19, 2019 by xi'an

A 2017 paper by Ana Pajor published in Bayesian Analysis addresses my favourite problem [of computing the marginal likelihood] and which I discussed on the ‘Og, linking with another paper by Lenk published in 2012 in JCGS. That I already discussed here last year. Lenk’s (2009) paper is actually using a technique related to the harmonic mean correction based on HPD regions Darren Wraith and myself proposed at MaxEnt 2009. And which Jean-Michel and I presented at Frontiers of statistical decision making and Bayesian analysis in 2010. As I had only vague memories about the arithmetic mean version, we discussed the paper together with graduate students in Paris Dauphine.

The arithmetic mean solution, representing the marginal likelihood as the prior average of the likelihood, is a well-known approach used as well as the basis for nested sampling. With the improvement consisting in restricting the simulation to a set Ð with sufficiently high posterior probability. I am quite uneasy about P(Ð|y) estimated by 1 as the shape of the set containing all posterior simulations is completely arbitrary, parameterisation dependent, and very random since based on the extremes of this posterior sample. Plus, the set Ð converges to the entire parameter space with the number of posterior simulations. An alternative that we advocated in our earlier paper is to take Ð as the HPD region or a variational Bayes version . But the central issue with the HPD regions is how to construct these from an MCMC output and how to compute both P(Ð) and P(Ð|y). It does not seem like a good idea to set P(Ð|x) to the intended α level for the HPD coverage. Using a non-parametric version for estimating Ð could be in the end the only reasonable solution.

As a test, I reran the example of a conjugate normal model used in the paper, based on (exact) simulations from both the prior and  the posterior, and obtained approximations that were all close from the true marginal. With Chib’s being exact in that case (of course!), and an arithmetic mean surprisingly close without an importance correction:

> print(c(hame,chme,came,chib))
[1] -107.6821 -106.5968 -115.5950 -115.3610

Both harmonic versions are of the right order but not trustworthy, the truncation to such a set Ð as the one chosen in this paper having little impact.

new estimators of evidence

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 19, 2018 by xi'an

In an incredible accumulation of coincidences, I came across yet another paper about evidence and the harmonic mean challenge, by Yu-Bo Wang, Ming-Hui Chen [same as in Chen, Shao, Ibrahim], Lynn Kuo, and Paul O. Lewis this time, published in Bayesian Analysis. (Disclaimer: I was not involved in the reviews of any of these papers!)  Authors who arelocated in Storrs, Connecticut, in geographic and thematic connection with the original Gelfand and Dey (1994) paper! (Private joke about the Old Man of Storr in above picture!)

“The working parameter space is essentially the constrained support considered by Robert and Wraith (2009) and Marin and Robert (2010).”

The central idea is to use a more general function than our HPD restricted prior but still with a known integral. Not in the sense of control variates, though. The function of choice is a weighted sum of indicators of terms of a finite partition, which implies a compact parameter set Ω. Or a form of HPD region, although it is unclear when the volume can be derived. While the consistency of the estimator of the inverse normalising constant [based on an MCMC sample] is unsurprising, the more advanced part of the paper is about finding the optimal sequence of weights, as in control variates. But it is also unsurprising in that the weights are proportional to the inverses of the inverse posteriors over the sets in the partition. Since these are hard to derive in practice, the authors come up with a fairly interesting alternative, which is to take the value of the posterior at an arbitrary point of the relevant set.

The paper also contains an extension replacing the weights with functions that are integrable and with known integrals. Which is hard for most choices, even though it contains the regular harmonic mean estimator as a special case. And should also suffer from the curse of dimension when the constraint to keep the target almost constant is implemented (as in Figure 1).

The method, when properly calibrated, does much better than harmonic mean (not a surprise) and than Petris and Tardella (2007) alternative, but no other technique, on toy problems like Normal, Normal mixture, and probit regression with three covariates (no Pima Indians this time!). As an aside I find it hard to understand how the regular harmonic mean estimator takes longer than this more advanced version, which should require more calibration. But I find it hard to see a general application of the principle, because the partition needs to be chosen in terms of the target. Embedded balls cannot work for every possible problem, even with ex-post standardisation.

 

the [not so infamous] arithmetic mean estimator

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 15, 2018 by xi'an

“Unfortunately, no perfect solution exists.” Anna Pajor

Another paper about harmonic and not-so-harmonic mean estimators that I (also) missed came out last year in Bayesian Analysis. The author is Anna Pajor, whose earlier note with Osiewalski I also spotted on the same day. The idea behind the approach [which belongs to the branch of Monte Carlo methods requiring additional simulations after an MCMC run] is to start as the corrected harmonic mean estimator on a restricted set A as to avoid tails of the distributions and the connected infinite variance issues that plague the harmonic mean estimator (an old ‘Og tune!). The marginal density p(y) then satisfies an identity involving the prior expectation of the likelihood function restricted to A divided by the posterior coverage of A. Which makes the resulting estimator unbiased only when this posterior coverage of A is known, which does not seem realist or efficient, except if A is an HPD region, as suggested in our earlier “safe” harmonic mean paper. And efficient only when A is well-chosen in terms of the likelihood function. In practice, the author notes that P(A|y) is to be estimated from the MCMC sequence and that the set A should be chosen to return large values of the likelihood, p(y|θ), through importance sampling, hence missing somehow the double opportunity of using an HPD region. Hence using the same default choice as in Lenk (2009), an HPD region which lower bound is derived as the minimum likelihood in the MCMC sample, “range of the posterior sampler output”. Meaning P(A|y)=1. (As an aside, the paper does not produce optimality properties or even heuristics towards efficiently choosing the various parameters to be calibrated in the algorithm, like the set A itself. As another aside, the paper concludes with a simulation study on an AR(p) model where the marginal may be obtained in closed form if stationarity is not imposed, which I first balked at, before realising that even in this setting both the posterior and the marginal do exist for a finite sample size, and hence the later can be estimated consistently by Monte Carlo methods.) A last remark is that computing costs are not discussed in the comparison of methods.

The final experiment in the paper is aiming at the marginal of a mixture model posterior, operating on the galaxy benchmark used by Roeder (1990) and about every other paper on mixtures since then (incl. ours). The prior is pseudo-conjugate, as in Chib (1995). And label-switching is handled by a random permutation of indices at each iteration. Which may not be enough to fight the attraction of the current mode on a Gibbs sampler and hence does not automatically correct Chib’s solution. As shown in Table 7 by the divergence with Radford Neal’s (1999) computations of the marginals, which happen to be quite close to the approximation proposed by the author. (As an aside, the paper mentions poor performances of Chib’s method when centred at the posterior mean, but this is a setting where the posterior mean is meaningless because of the permutation invariance. As another, I do not understand how the RMSE can be computed in this real data situation.) The comparison is limited to Chib’s method and a few versions of arithmetic and harmonic means. Missing nested sampling (Skilling, 2006; Chopin and X, 2011), and attuned importance sampling as in Berkoff et al. (2003), Marin, Mengersen and X (2005), and the most recent Lee and X (2016) in Bayesian Analysis.

another version of the corrected harmonic mean estimator

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on June 11, 2018 by xi'an

A few days ago I came across a short paper in the Central European Journal of Economic Modelling and Econometrics by Pajor and Osiewalski that proposes a correction to the infamous harmonic mean estimator that is essentially the one Darren and I made in 2009, namely to restrict the evaluations of the likelihood function to a subset A of the simulations from the posterior. Paper that relates to an earlier 2009 paper by Peter Lenk, which investigates the same object with this same proposal and that we had missed for all that time. The difference is that, while we examine an arbitrary HPD region at level 50% or 80% as the subset A, Lenk proposes to derive a minimum likelihood value from the MCMC run and to use the associated HPD region, which means using all simulations, hence producing the same object as the original harmonic mean estimator, except that it is corrected by a multiplicative factor P(A). Or rather an approximation. This correction thus maintains the infinite variance of the original, a point apparently missed in the paper.

divide & reconquer

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 5, 2018 by xi'an

Qi Liu, Anindya Bhadra, and William Cleveland from Purdue have arXived a paper entitled Divide and Recombine for Large and Complex Data: Model Likelihood Functions using MCMC. Which is a variation on the earlier divide & … papers attempting at handling large datasets. The beginning is quite similar to these earlier papers in that the likelihood is split into sub-likelihoods, approximated from MCMC samples and recombined into an approximate full likelihood. As in for instance Scott et al. one approximation use for the subsample is to replace the likelihood with a Normal approximation, or a skew Normal generalisation, which remains  a limited choice for heavy tailed likelihoods. Producing a Normal and skew-Normal approximation for the whole [data] likelihood, respectively. If I understand correctly, these approximations are missing a normalising constant to bring them to scale with the true likelihood, which I do not completely understand as the likelihood only needs to be defined up to a [constant] constant for most purposes, including Bayesian ones. The  method of estimation of this constant proposed therein is called the contour probability algorithm and it consists in using a highest density region to compare a likelihood and its approximation. (Nothing to do with our adaptation of Gelfand and Dey (1994) based on HPDs, with Darren Wright. Nor with nested sampling.) Returning a form of qq-plot. This is rather exploratory, while hardly addressing the issue of the precision of such approximations and the resolution of conflicting proposals. And the comparison with all these other recent proposals for splitting likelihoods into manageable bits (proposals that are mentioned in the final section, including our recentering scheme with my student Changye Wu).