Archive for Iceland

AISTATS 2016 [call for submissions]

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 21, 2015 by xi'an

At the last (European) AISTATS 2014, I agreed to be the program co-chair for AISTATS 2016, along with Arthur Gretton from the Gatsby Unit, at UCL. (AISTATS stands for Artificial Intelligence and Statistics.) Thanks to Arthur’s efforts and dedication, as the organisation of an AISTATS meeting is far more complex than any conference I have organised so far!, the meeting is taking shape. First, it will take place in Cadiz, Andalucía, Spain, on May 9-11, 2016. (A place more related to the conference palm tree logo than the previous location in Reykjavik, even though I would be the last one to complain it took place in Iceland!)

Second, the call for submissions is now open. The process is similar to other machine learning conferences in that papers are first submitted for the conference proceedings, then undergo a severe and tight reviewing process, with a response period for the authors to respond to the reviewers’ comments, and that only the accepted papers can be presented as posters, some of which are selected for an additional oral presentation. The major dates for submitting to AISTATS 2016 are

Proceedings track paper submission deadline 23:59 UTC Oct 9, 2015
Proceedings track initial reviews available Nov 16, 2015
Proceedings track author feedback deadline Nov 23, 2015
Proceedings track paper decision notifications Dec 20, 2015

With submission instructions available at this address. Including the electronic submission site.

I was quite impressed by the quality and intensity of the AISTATS 2014 conference, which is why I accepted so readily being program co-chair, and hence predict an equally rewarding AISTATS 2016, thus encouraging all interested ‘Og’s readers to consider submitting a paper there! Even though I confess it will make a rather busy first semester for 2016, between MCMSki V in January, the CIRM Statistics month in February, the CRiSM workshop on Eatimating constants in April, AISTATS 2016 thus in May, and ISBA 2016 in June…

Mýrin aka Jar City [book review]

Posted in Books, Mountains, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 26, 2015 by xi'an

Mýrin (“The Bog”) is the third novel in the Inspector Erlendur series written by Arnaldur Indridason. It contains the major themes of the series, from the fascination for unexplained disappearances in Iceland to Elendur’s inability to deal with his family responsibilities, to domestic violence, to exhumations. The death that starts the novel takes place in the district of Norðurmýri, “the northern marsh”, not far from the iconic Hallgrimskirkja, and not far either from DeCODE, the genetic company I visited last June and which stores genetic information about close to a million Icelanders, the Íslendingabók. And which plays an important and nefarious role in the current novel. While this episode takes place mostly between Reykjavik and Keflavik, hence does not offer any foray into Icelandic landscapes, it reflects quite vividly on the cultural pressure still present in the recent years to keep rapes and sexual violence a private matter, hidden from an indifferent or worse police force. It also shows how the police misses (in 2001) the important genetic clues for being yet unaware of the immense and frightening possibilities of handling the genetic code of an entire population. (The English and French titles refer to the unauthorised private collections of body part accumulated [in jars] by doctors after autopsies, families being unaware of the fact.) As usual, solving the case is the least important part of the story, which tells about broken lifes and survivors against all odds.

Einstök

Posted in pictures, Travel, Wines with tags , , , , , , on July 12, 2015 by xi'an

einstok

midnight sun [minus 50mn]

Posted in pictures, Running, Travel with tags , , , , , , on June 15, 2015 by xi'an

moon2

desperately seeking puffins!

Posted in Kids, Mountains, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , on June 13, 2015 by xi'an

cliffOn Sunday afternoon, I made a brief trip to the southern coast of the Reykjanes Peninsula in an attempt to watch puffins. According to my guide book, the cliffs at Krýsuvíkurberg were populated with many species of birdlife, including the elusive puffin. However, I could only spot gulls, and more gulls, as I walked a few kilometres along those cliffs and away from the occasional 4WDcliff2 stopping by the end of a dirt road [my small rental car could not handle that far]. When I was about to turn back, I spotted different birds on a small rock promontory, too far for me to tell the species, and as I was zooming at them, a puffin flew by!, so small that I almost missed it. I tried to see if any other was dwelling in the cliffs left and right but to no avail. A few minutes later, presumably the same puffin flew back and this was the end of it. Even after looking at the enlarged picture, I cannot tell what those “other” birds are: presumably Brünnich’s guillemots…

Icelandic landscape [#3]

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , on June 12, 2015 by xi'an

Kleifarvatn3

capture mark recapture with no mark and no recapture [aka 23andmyfish]

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on June 11, 2015 by xi'an

moonA very exciting talk today at NBBC15 here in Reykjavik was delivered by Mark Bravington yesterday on Close-kin mark recapture by modern magic (!). Although Mark is from Australia, being a Hobart resident does qualify him for the Nordic branch of the conference! The exciting idea is to use genetic markers to link catches in a (fish) population as being related as parent-offspring or as siblings. This sounds like science-fantasy when you first hear of it!, but it is actually working better than standard capture-mark-recapture methods for populations of a certain size (so that the chances to find related animals are not the absolute zero!, as, e.g., krill populations). The talk was focussed on bluefin tuna, whose survival is unlikely under the current fishing pressure… Among the advantages, a much more limited impact of the capture on the animal, since only a small amount of genetic material is needed, no tag loss, tag destruction by hunters, or tag impact of the animal survival, no recapture, a unique identification of each animal, and the potential for a detailed amount of information through the genetic record. Ideally, the entire sample could lead to a reconstruction of its genealogy all the way to the common ancestor, a wee bit like what 23andme proposes for humans, but this remains at the science-fantasy level given what is currently know about the fish species genomes.

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