Archive for importance sampling

sampling and imbalanced

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , on June 21, 2019 by xi'an

Deborshee Sen, Matthias Sachs, Jianfeng Lu and David Dunson have recently arXived a sub-sampling paper for  classification (logistic) models where some covariates or some responses are imbalanced. With a PDMP, namely zig-zag, used towards preserving the correct invariant distribution (as already mentioned in an earlier post on the zig-zag zampler and in a recent Annals paper by Joris Bierkens, Paul Fearnhead, and Gareth Roberts (Warwick)). The current paper is thus an improvement on the above. Using (non-uniform) importance sub-sampling across observations and simpler upper bounds for the Poisson process. A rather practical form of Poisson thinning. And proposing unbiased estimates of the sub-sample log-posterior as well as stratified sub-sampling.

I idly wondered if the zig-zag sampler could itself be improved by not switching the bouncing directions at random since directions associated with almost certainly null coefficients should be neglected as much as possible, but the intensity functions associated with the directions do incorporate this feature. Except for requiring computation of the intensities for all directions. This is especially true when facing many covariates.

Thinking of the logistic regression model itself, it is sort of frustrating that something so close to an exponential family causes so many headaches! Formally, it is an exponential family but the normalising constant is rather unwieldy, especially when there are many observations and many covariates. The Polya-Gamma completion is a way around, but it proves highly costly when the dimension is large…

MCMC importance samplers for intractable likelihoods

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 3, 2019 by xi'an

Jordan Franks just posted on arXiv his PhD dissertation at the University of Jyväskylä, where he discuses several of his works:

  1. M. Vihola, J. Helske, and J. Franks. Importance sampling type estimators based on approximate marginal MCMC. Preprint arXiv:1609.02541v5, 2016.
  2. J. Franks and M. Vihola. Importance sampling correction versus standard averages of reversible MCMCs in terms of the asymptotic variance. Preprint arXiv:1706.09873v4, 2017.
  3. J. Franks, A. Jasra, K. J. H. Law and M. Vihola.Unbiased inference for discretely observed hidden Markov model diffusions. Preprint arXiv:1807.10259v4, 2018.
  4. M. Vihola and J. Franks. On the use of ABC-MCMC with inflated tolerance and post-correction. Preprint arXiv:1902.00412, 2019

focusing on accelerated approximate MCMC (in the sense of pseudo-marginal MCMC) and delayed acceptance (as in our recently accepted paper). Comparing delayed acceptance with MCMC importance sampling to the advantage of the later. And discussing the choice of the tolerance sequence for ABC-MCMC. (Although I did not get from the thesis itself the target of the improvement discussed.)

did variational Bayes work?

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 2, 2019 by xi'an

An interesting ICML 2018 paper by Yuling Yao, Aki Vehtari, Daniel Simpson, and Andrew Gelman I missed last summer on [the fairly important issue of] assessing the quality or lack thereof of a variational Bayes approximation. In the sense of being near enough from the true posterior. The criterion that they propose in this paper relates to the Pareto smoothed importance sampling technique discussed in an earlier post and which I remember discussing with Andrew when he visited CREST a few years ago. The truncation of the importance weights of prior x likelihood / VB approximation avoids infinite variance issues but induces an unknown amount of bias. The resulting diagnostic is based on the estimation of the Pareto order k. If the true value of k is less than ½, the variance of the associated Pareto distribution is finite. The paper suggests to conclude at the worth of the variational approximation when the estimate of k is less than 0.7, based on the empirical assessment of the earlier paper. The paper also contains a remark on the poor performances of the generalisation of this method to marginal settings, that is, when the importance weight is the ratio of the true and variational marginals for a sub-vector of interest. I find the counter-performances somewhat worrying in that Rao-Blackwellisation arguments make me prefer marginal ratios to joint ratios. It may however be due to a poor approximation of the marginal ratio that reflects on the approximation and not on the ratio itself. A second proposal in the paper focus on solely the point estimate returned by the variational Bayes approximation. Testing that the posterior predictive is well-calibrated. This is less appealing, especially when the authors point out the “dissadvantage is that this diagnostic does not cover the case where the observed data is not well represented by the model.” In other words, misspecified situations. This potential misspecification could presumably be tested by comparing the Pareto fit based on the actual data with a Pareto fit based on simulated data. Among other deficiencies, they point that this is “a local diagnostic that will not detect unseen modes”. In other words, what you get is what you see.

Gibbs clashes with importance sampling

Posted in pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , on April 11, 2019 by xi'an

In an X validated question, an interesting proposal was made: at each (component-wise) step of a Gibbs sampler, replace simulation from the exact full conditional with simulation from an alternate density and weight the resulting simulation with a term made of a product of (a) the previous weight (b) the ratio of the true conditional over the substitute for the new value and (c) the inverse ratio for the earlier value of the same component. Which does not work for several reasons:

  1. the reweighting is doomed by its very propagation in that it keeps multiplying ratios of expectation one, which means an almost sure chance of degenerating;
  2. the weights are computed for a previous value that has not been generated from the same proposal and is anyway already properly weighted;
  3. due to the change in dimension produced by Gibbs, the actual target is the full conditional, which involves an intractable normalising constant;
  4. there is no guarantee for the weights to have finite variance, esp. when the proposal has thinner tails than the target.

as can be readily checked by a quick simulation experiment. The funny thing is that a proper importance weight can be constructed when envisioning  the sequence of Gibbs steps as a Metropolis proposal (in the dimension of the target).

Bayesian inference with intractable normalizing functions

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 13, 2018 by xi'an

In the latest September issue of JASA I received a few days ago, I spotted a review paper by Jaewoo Park & Murali Haran on intractable normalising constants Z(θ). There have been many proposals for solving this problem as well as several surveys, some conferences and even a book. The current survey focus on MCMC solutions, from auxiliary variable approaches to likelihood approximation algorithms (albeit without ABC entries, even though the 2006 auxiliary variable solutions of Møller et al. et of Murray et al. do simulate pseudo-observations and hence…). This includes the MCMC approximations to auxiliary sampling proposed by Faming Liang and co-authors across several papers. And the paper Yves Atchadé, Nicolas Lartillot and I wrote ten years ago on an adaptive MCMC targeting Z(θ) and using stochastic approximation à la Wang-Landau. Park & Haran stress the relevance of using sufficient statistics in this approach towards fighting computational costs, which makes me wonder if an ABC version could be envisioned.  The paper also includes pseudo-marginal techniques like Russian Roulette (once spelled Roullette) and noisy MCMC as proposed in Alquier et al.  (2016). These methods are compared on three examples: (1) the Ising model, (2) a social network model, the Florentine business dataset used in our original paper, and a larger one where most methods prove too costly, and (3) an attraction-repulsion point process model. In conclusion, an interesting survey, taking care to spell out the calibration requirements and the theoretical validation, if of course depending on the chosen benchmarks.

rethinking the ESS

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 14, 2018 by xi'an

Following Victor Elvira‘s visit to Dauphine, one and a half year ago, where we discussed the many defects of ESS as a default measure of efficiency for importance sampling estimators, and then some more efforts (mostly from Victor!) to formalise these criticisms, Victor, Luca Martino and I wrote a paper on this notion, now arXived. (Victor most kindly attributes the origin of the paper to a 2010 ‘Og post on the topic!) The starting thread of the (re?)analysis of this tool introduced by Kong (1992) is that the ESS used in the literature is an approximation to the “true” ESS, generally unavailable. Approximation that is pretty crude and hence impacts the relevance of using it as the assessment tool for comparing importance sampling methods. In the paper, we re-derive (with the uttermost precision) the resulting approximation and list the many assumptions that [would] validate this approximation. The resulting drawbacks are many, from the absurd property of always being worse than direct sampling, to being independent from the target function and from the sample per se. Since only importance weights matter. This list of issues is not exactly brand new, but we think it is worth signaling given the fact that this approximation has been widely used in the last 25 years, due to its simplicity, as a practical rule of thumb [!] in a wide variety of importance sampling methods. In continuation of the directions drafted in Martino et al. (2017), we also indicate some alternative notions of importance efficiency. Note that this paper does not cover the use of ESS for MCMC algorithms, where it is somewhat more legit, if still too rudimentary to really catch convergence or lack thereof! [Note: I refrained from the post title resinking the ESS…]

optimal approximations for importance sampling

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 17, 2018 by xi'an

“…building such a zero variance estimator is most of the times not practical…”

As I was checking [while looking at Tofino inlet from my rental window] on optimal importance functions following a question on X validated, I came across this arXived note by Pantaleoni and Heitz, where they suggest using weighted sums of step functions to reach minimum variance. However, the difficulty with probability densities that are step functions is that they necessarily have a compact support, which thus make them unsuitable for targeted integrands with non-compact support. And making the purpose of the note and the derivation of the optimal weights moot. It points out its connection with the reference paper of Veach and Guibas (1995) as well as He and Owen (2014), a follow-up to the other reference paper by Owen and Zhou (2000).