Archive for ISI

bootstrap in Nature

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 29, 2018 by xi'an

A news item in the latest issue of Nature I received about Brad Efron winning the “Nobel Prize of Statistics” this year. The bootstrap is certainly an invention worth the recognition, not to mention Efron’s contribution to empirical Bayes analysis,, even though I remain overall reserved about the very notion of a Nobel prize in any field… With an appropriate XXL quote, who called the bootstrap method the ‘best statistical pain reliever ever produced’!

on confidence distributions

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , on January 10, 2018 by xi'an

As Regina Liu gave her talk at ISI this morning on fusion learning and confidence distributions, this led me to think anew about this strange notion of confidence distributions, building a distribution on the parameter space without a prior to go with it, implicitly or explicitly, and vaguely differing from fiducial inference. (As an aside, the Wikipedia page on confidence distributions is rather heavily supporting the concept and was primarily written by someone from Rutgers, where the modern version was developed. [And as an aside inside the aside, Schweder and Hjort’s book is sitting in my office, waiting for me!])

Recall that a confidence distribution is a sample dependent distribution on the parameter space, which is uniform U(0,1) [in the sample] at the “true” value of the parameter. Used thereafter as a posterior distribution. (Again, almost always without a prior to go with it. Which is an incoherence from a probabilistic perspective. not mentioning the issue of operating without a pre-defined dominating measure. This measure issue is truly bothering me!) This seems to include fiducial distributions based on a pivot, unless I am confused. As noted in the review by Nadarajah et al. Moreover, the concept of creating a pseudo-posterior out of an existing (frequentist) confidence interval procedure to create a new (frequentist) procedure does not carry an additional validation per se, as it clearly depends on the choice of the initialising procedure. (Not even mentioning the lack of invariance and the intricacy of multidimensional extensions.)

Better together in Kolkata [slides]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 4, 2018 by xi'an

Here are the slides of the talk on modularisation I am giving today at the PC Mahalanobis 125 Conference in Kolkata, mostly borrowed from Pierre’s talk at O’Bayes 2018 last month:

[which made me realise Slideshare has discontinued the option to update one’s presentation, forcing users to create a new presentation for each update!] Incidentally, the amphitheatre at ISI is located right on top of a geological exhibit room with a reconstituted Barapasaurus tagorei so I will figuratively ride a dinosaur during my talk!

Jayanta Kumar Ghosh [1937-2017]

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , on October 2, 2017 by xi'an

Just head from Sonia and Judith that our friend and fellow Bayesian Jayanta K Ghosh (জয়ন্ত কুমার ঘোষ in Bengali) has passed away a few days ago in Lafayette. He was a wonderful man, very kind to everyone and open for discussing all aspects of Bayesian theory and methodology. While he worked on many branches of statistics, he is more know to Bayesians for his contributions to Bayesian asymptotics. From Bernstein-von-Mises convergence theorems to frequentist validation of non-informative priors, to the Bayesian analysis of infinite dimensional problems, including consistency of posteriors and rates of convergence, and to Bayesian and Empirical Bayes model selection rules in high dimensional problems. He also wrote an introductory textbook on Bayesian Statistics ten years ago with Mohan Delampady and Tapas Samanta. And a monograph of higher order asymptotics. I knew from this summer that J K was quite sick and am quite sad to learn of his demise. He will be missed by all for his gentleness and by Bayesians for his contributions to the fields of objective and non-parametric Bayesian statistics…

Judith Rousseau gets Bernoulli Society Ethel Newbold Prize

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 31, 2015 by xi'an

As announced at the 60th ISI World Meeting in Rio de Janeiro, my friend, co-author, and former PhD student Judith Rousseau got the first Ethel Newbold Prize! Congrats, Judith! And well-deserved! The prize is awarded by the Bernoulli Society on the following basis

The Ethel Newbold Prize is to be awarded biannually to an outstanding statistical scientist for a body of work that represents excellence in research in mathematical statistics, and/or excellence in research that links developments in a substantive field to new advances in statistics. In any year in which the award is due, the prize will not be awarded unless the set of all nominations includes candidates from both genders.

and is funded by Wiley. I support very much this (inclusive) approach of “recognizing the importance of women in statistics”, without creating a prize restricted to women nominees (and hence exclusive).  Thanks to the members of the Program Committee of the Bernoulli Society for setting that prize and to Nancy Reid in particular.

Ethel Newbold was a British statistician who worked during WWI in the Ministry of Munitions and then became a member of the newly created Medical Research Council, working on medical and industrial studies. She was the first woman to receive the Guy Medal in Silver in 1928. Just to stress that much remains to be done towards gender balance, the second and last woman to get a Guy Medal in Silver is Sylvia Richardson, in 2009… (In addition, Valerie Isham, Nicky Best, and Fiona Steele got a Guy Medal in Bronze, out of the 71 so far awarded, while no woman ever got a Guy Medal in Gold.) Funny occurrences of coincidence: Ethel May Newbold was educated at Tunbridge Wells, the place where Bayes was a minister, while Sylvia is now head of the Medical Research Council biostatistics unit in Cambridge.

Χ on stage

Posted in Kids, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on September 11, 2013 by xi'an

XonXA screen-shot of the video taken during my talk in Hong Kong (restricted to 2013 WSC attendants, I am afraid. Or not.), where I happened to be wearing my favourite (and only) Scotland rugby shirt with prominent  Χ labels…

Hong Kong snapshot

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Running, Travel, University life with tags , , , on August 27, 2013 by xi'an

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