Archive for Italian Alps

sixteen ways to defend a walled city [book review]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 2, 2020 by xi'an

The title of this book, sixteen ways to defend a walled city,  enticed me to order it and after a slow beginning I became hooked to the story. I had forgotten I had read and enjoyed a book by K.J. Parker before, namely Devices and Desires, which was quite pleasant as far as I remember! (Not to be confused with another book under the same title by P.D. James.) The concept is somewhat similar, with the same universe if eons laters: boosted medieval warfare seen from an engineer’s perspective. (Devices and Desires started the Engineer Trilogy to make it clear to everyone!) Which makes for a pleasant change as devious ingenuity usually trumps frontal strength and there is at last attention paid to good, I mean in the sense of good delivery, resources, shortage, &tc.! The style is light and funny, the characters are somewhat too nice overall (until they die), but this makes for a tolerable kind of pastiche, most enjoyable to stand a heatwave! A second book just came out and I may be tempted to buy it, heatwave or not. Although the first one concluded in a rather definitive way, making a sequel unlikely… I may also complete the Engineer Trilogy.

over the Alps [jatp]

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 31, 2019 by xi'an

over the Bernese Alps [jatp]

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 4, 2017 by xi'an

Great views of the Bernese and Grisonese Alps on both legs of my trip to and from Venezia. Flying over Les Diablerets, Bormio and many other places I visited over the years..

art brut [oh door]

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , on September 23, 2017 by xi'an

Il cimitero degli alpinisti

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , , on August 20, 2017 by xi'an

In the cemetery around Chiesa Vecchia in Macugnaga, at the bottom of Monte Rosa (and the other size from Zermatt), there is such a number of alpinists and guides buried there that the cemetery is called the cemetery of the alpinists. A memorial recalls deaths of local guides and climbers on the different routes of the Monte Rosa group [there is no Monte Rosa peak per se but a collection of 15 tops above 4000m]. Plus crosses and plaques on the church wall for those whose bodies were not recovered, according to a local guide. (Which sounds strange given that these are not the Himalayas! Unless these are glacier-related deaths…]