Archive for iterated importance sampling

resampling methods

Posted in Books, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 6, 2017 by xi'an

A paper that was arXived [and that I missed!] last summer is a work on resampling by Mathieu Gerber, Nicolas Chopin (CREST), and Nick Whiteley. Resampling is used to sample from a weighted empirical distribution and to correct for very small weights in a weighted sample that otherwise lead to degeneracy in sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). Since this step is based on random draws, it induces noise (while improving the estimation of the target), reducing this noise is preferable, hence the appeal of replacing plain multinomial sampling with more advanced schemes. The initial motivation is for sequential Monte Carlo where resampling is rife and seemingly compulsory, but this also applies to importance sampling when considering several schemes at once. I remember discussing alternative schemes with Nicolas, then completing his PhD, as well as Olivier Cappé, Randal Douc, and Eric Moulines at the time (circa 2004) we were working on the Hidden Markov book. And getting then a somewhat vague idea as to why systematic resampling failed to converge.

In this paper, Mathieu, Nicolas and Nick show that stratified sampling (where a uniform is generated on every interval of length 1/n) enjoys some form of consistent, while systematic sampling (where the “same” uniform is generated on every interval of length 1/n) does not necessarily enjoy this consistency. There actually exists cases where convergence does not occur. However, a residual version of systematic sampling (where systematic sampling is applied to the residuals of the decimal parts of the n-enlarged weights) is itself consistent.

The paper also studies the surprising feature uncovered by Kitagawa (1996) that stratified sampling applied to an ordered sample brings an error of O(1/n²) between the cdf rather than the usual O(1/n). It took me a while to even understand the distinction between the original and the ordered version (maybe because Nicolas used the empirical cdf during his SAD (Stochastic Algorithm Day!) talk, ecdf that is the same for ordered and initial samples).  And both systematic and deterministic sampling become consistent in this case. The result was shown in dimension one by Kitagawa (1996) but extends to larger dimensions via the magical trick of the Hilbert curve.

ABC for big data

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on June 23, 2015 by xi'an

abcpestou“The results in this paper suggest that ABC can scale to large data, at least for models with a xed number of parameters, under the assumption that the summary statistics obey a central limit theorem.”

In a week rich with arXiv submissions about MCMC and “big data”, like the Variational consensus Monte Carlo of Rabinovich et al., or scalable Bayesian inference via particle mirror descent by Dai et al., Wentao Li and Paul Fearnhead contributed an impressive paper entitled Behaviour of ABC for big data. However, a word of warning: the title is somewhat misleading in that the paper does not address the issue of big or tall data per se, e.g., the impossibility to handle the whole data at once and to reproduce it by simulation, but rather the asymptotics of ABC. The setting is not dissimilar to the earlier Fearnhead and Prangle (2012) Read Paper. The central theme of this theoretical paper [with 24 pages of proofs!] is to study the connection between the number N of Monte Carlo simulations and the tolerance value ε when the number of observations n goes to infinity. A main result in the paper is that the ABC posterior mean can have the same asymptotic distribution as the MLE when ε=o(n-1/4). This is however in opposition with of no direct use in practice as the second main result that the Monte Carlo variance is well-controlled only when ε=O(n-1/2).

Something I have (slight) trouble with is the construction of an importance sampling function of the fABC(s|θ)α when, obviously, this function cannot be used for simulation purposes. The authors point out this fact, but still build an argument about the optimal choice of α, namely away from 0 and 1, like ½. Actually, any value different from 0,1, is sensible, meaning that the range of acceptable importance functions is wide. Most interestingly (!), the paper constructs an iterative importance sampling ABC in a spirit similar to Beaumont et al. (2009) ABC-PMC. Even more interestingly, the ½ factor amounts to updating the scale of the proposal as twice the scale of the target, just as in PMC.

Another aspect of the analysis I do not catch is the reason for keeping the Monte Carlo sample size to a fixed value N, while setting a sequence of acceptance probabilities (or of tolerances) along iterations. This is a very surprising result in that the Monte Carlo error does remain under control and does not dominate the overall error!

“Whilst our theoretical results suggest that point estimates based on the ABC posterior have good properties, they do not suggest that the ABC posterior is a good approximation to the true posterior, nor that the ABC posterior will accurately quantify the uncertainty in estimates.”

Overall, this is clearly a paper worth reading for understanding the convergence issues related with ABC. With more theoretical support than the earlier Fearnhead and Prangle (2012). However, it does not provide guidance into the construction of a sequence of Monte Carlo samples nor does it discuss the selection of the summary statistic, which has obviously a major impact on the efficiency of the estimation. And to relate to the earlier warning, it does not cope with “big data” in that it reproduces the original simulation of the n sized sample.