Archive for jazz

Didier Lockwood (1956-2018)

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , on February 21, 2018 by xi'an

Bayesian astrostats under Laplace’s gaze

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 11, 2016 by xi'an

This afternoon, I was part of a jury of an astrostatistics thesis, where the astronomy part was about binary objects in the Solar System, and the statistics part about detecting patterns in those objects, unsurprisingly. The first part was highly classical using several non-parametric tests like Kolmogorov-Smirnov to test whether those binary objects were different from single objects. While the p-values were very tiny, I felt these values were over-interpreted in the thesis, because the sample size of N=30 leads to some scepticism about numerical quantities like 0.0008. While I do not want to sound pushing for Bayesian solutions in every setting, this case is a good illustration of the nefarious power of p-values, which are almost always taken at face value, i.e., where 0.008 is understood in terms of the null hypothesis and not in terms of the observed realisation of the p-value. Even within a frequentist framework, the distribution of this p-value should be evaluated or estimated one way or another, as there is no reason to believe it is anywhere near a Uniform(0,1) distribution.The second part of the thesis was about the estimation of some parameters of the laws of the orbits of those dual objects and the point of interest for me was the purely mechanical construction of a likelihood function that was an exponential transform of a sum of residuals, made of squared differences between the observations and their expectations. Or a power of such differences. This was called the “statistical model” in the thesis and I presume in part of the astrostats literature. This reminded me of the first meeting I had with my colleagues from Besançon, where they could not use such mechanical versions because of intractable expectations and used instead simulations from their physical model, literally reinventing ABC. This resolution had the same feeling, closer to indirect inference than regular inference, although it took me half the defence to realise it.

The defence actually took part in the beautiful historical Perrault’s building of Observatoire de Paris, in downtown Paris, where Cassini, Arago and Le Verrier once ruled!  In the council room under paintings of major French astronomers, including Laplace himself, looking quite smug in his academician costume. The building is built around the Paris Zero Meridian (which got dethroned in 1911 by the Greenwich Zero Meridian, which I contemplated as a kid since my childhood church had the Greenwich drawn on the nave stones). The customary “pot” after the thesis and its validation by the jury was in the less historical cafeteria of the Observatoire, but it included a jazz big band, which made this thesis defence quite unique in many ways!

Moon over Soho [book review]

Posted in Books, Kids, Travel with tags , , , , , , , on November 29, 2014 by xi'an

London by Delta, Dec. 14, 2011

A book from the pile I brought back from Gainesville. And the first I read, mostly during the trip back to Paris. Both because I was eager to see the sequel to Rivers of London and because it was short and easy to carry in a pocket.

“From the figures I have, I believe that two to three jazz musicians have died within twenty-four hours of playing a gig in the Greater London area in the last year.”
“I take it that’s statistically significant?

Moon over Soho is the second installment in the Peter Grant series by Ben Aaronovitch. It would not read well on its own as it takes over when Rivers of London stopped. Even though it reintroduces most of the rules of this magical universe. Most characters are back (except for the hostaged Beverly) and they are trying to cope with what happened in the first installment. The story is even more centred on jazz than in the first volume, with as a corollary, Peter Grant’s parents taking a more important part in the book. The recovering Leslie is hardly seen (for obvious reasons) and heard, which leaves a convenient hole in Grant’s sentimental life! The book also introduces a major magical villein who will undoubtedly figures in the incoming books. Another great story, even though the central plot has a highly predictable ending, and even more end of the ending, and some parts sound like repetitions of similar parts in the first volume. But the tone, the pace, the style, the humour, the luv’ of Lundun, all are there and so it is all that matters! (I again bemoan the missing map of London!)

Inkala

Posted in Kids with tags , , , , on February 15, 2010 by xi'an

On Saturday night, the jazz quartet of André Manoukian was playing in the nearby theater and my daughter and I took advantage of this opportunity to go and listen to the pieces of its only album, Inkala. (My daughter was alas more attracted to the evening by the fact that Manoukian is one of the judges in the French television reality show Nouvelle Star, the local version of Pop Idol!) As you can judge from this Inkala extract, or this Square Circles extract, the type of jazz played by this quartet is nice and pleasant, but not highly innovative, reminding me of average Keith Jarrett’s… (The use of the Armenian doudouk flute has a mixed impact, very gripping when played in the traditional mode, rather ugly when processed through a synthetiser.)