Archive for Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics

auxiliary likelihood ABC in print

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , on March 1, 2019 by xi'an

Our paper with Gael Martin, Brendan McCabe , David Frazier and Worapree Maneesoonthorn, with full title Auxiliary Likelihood-Based Approximate Bayesian Computation in State Space Models, has now appeared in JCGS. To think that it started in Rimini in 2009, when I met Gael for the first time at the Rimini Bayesian Econometrics conference, although we really started working on the paper in 2012 when I visited Monash makes me realise the enormous investment we made in this paper, especially by Gael whose stamina and enthusiasm never cease to amaze me!

down-under ABC paper accepted in JCGS!

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 25, 2018 by xi'an

Great news!, the ABC paper we had originally started in 2012 in Melbourne with Gael Martin and Brendan MacCabe, before joining forces with David Frazier and Worapree Maneesoothorn, in expanding its scope to using auxiliary likelihoods to run ABC in state-space models, just got accepted in the Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics. A reason to celebrate with a Mornington Peninsula Pinot Gris wine next time I visit Monash!

parallel Metropolis Hastings [published]

Posted in Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on October 27, 2011 by xi'an

As I was looking at the discussion paper by Yamin Yu and Xiao-Li Meng on improved efficiency for MCMC algorithms, which is available (for free) on-line, I realised the paper on parallel Metropolis-Hastings algorithm we wrote with Pierre Jacob and Murray Smith is now published in Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics (on-line). This is a special issue for the 20th anniversary of the Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics and our paper is within the “If Monte Carlo Be a Food of Computing, Simulate on” section! (My friends Olivier Cappé and Radu V. Craiu also have a paper in this issue.)  Here is the complete reference:

P. Jacob, C. P. Robert, & M. H. Smith. Using Parallel Computation to Improve Independent Metropolis–Hastings Based Estimation. Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics. September 1, 2011, 20(3): 616-635. doi:10.1198/jcgs.2011.10167

The [20th Anniversary Featured Discussion] paper by Yamin Yu and Xiao-Li Meng has already been mentioned on Andrew’s blog, it is full of interesting ideas and remarks about improving Gibbs efficiency, in the spirit of the very fine work Jim Hobert and his collaborators have been developing in the past decade,  fun titles (“To center or not center – that is not the question”, “coupling is more promising than compromising”, “be all our insomnia remembered”, and “needing inception”, in connection with the talk Xiao-Li gave in Paris two months ago….), and above all the fascinating puzzle of linking statistical concepts and Monte Carlo concepts. How comes sufficiency and ancillarity are to play a role in simulation?! Where is the simulation equivalent of Basu’s theorem? These questions obviously relate to the idea of turning simulation into a measure estimation issue, discussed in a post of mine after the Columbia workshop. This interweaving paper also brings back memories of the fantastic Biometrika 1994 interleaving paper by Liu, Wong, and Kong, with its elegant proof of positive decreasing correlation and of improvement by Rao-Blackwellisation [another statistics theorem!] for data augmentation.

JCGS 20th anniversary

Posted in R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , on March 22, 2011 by xi'an

For its 20th anniversary, JCGS offers free access to papers, including Andrew’s discussion paper Why tables are really much better than graphs. (Another serious ending for an April fool joke!) Incidentally (or rather coincidentally), I received today the great news that our Using parallel computation to improve Independent Metropolis-Hastings based estimation paper is accepted by JCGS. (First accepted paper ever for my PhD student Pierre!) Maybe making it into one of the 20th anniversary issues!