Archive for lifting

non-reversible gerrymandering

Posted in Books, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on September 3, 2020 by xi'an

Gregory Herschlag, Jonathan C. Mattingly [whom I met in Oaxaca and who acknowledges helpful conversations with Manon Michel while at CIRM two years ago], Matthias Sachs, and Evan Wyse just posted an arXiv paper using non-reversible MCMC methods to improve sampling of voting district plans towards fighting (partisan) Gerrymandering. In doing so we extend thecurrent framework for construction of non-reversible Markov chains on discrete samplingspaces by considering a generalization of skew detailed balance. Since this means sampling in a discrete space, the method using lifting. Meaning adding a dichotomous dummy variable, “based on a notion of flowing the center of mass of districts along a defined vector field”. The paper is quite detailed about the validation and the implementation of the method. With this interesting illustration for the mixing properties of the different versions:

 

non-reversible jump MCMC

Posted in Books, pictures, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on June 29, 2020 by xi'an

Philippe Gagnon and et Arnaud Doucet have recently arXived a paper on a non-reversible version of reversible jump MCMC, the methodology introduced by Peter Green in 1995 to tackle Bayesian model choice/comparison/exploration. Whom Philippe presented at BayesComp20.

“The objective of this paper is to propose sampling schemes which do not suffer from such a diffusive behaviour by exploiting the lifting idea (…)”

The idea is related to lifting, creating non-reversible behaviour by adding a direction index (a spin) to the exploration of the models, assumed to be totally ordered, as with nested models (mixtures, changepoints, &tc.).  As with earlier versions of lifting, the chain proceeds along one (spin) direction until the proposal is rejected in which case the spin spins. The acceptance probability in the event of a change of model (upwards or downwards) is essentially the same as the reversible one (meaning it includes the dreaded Jacobian!). The original difficulty with reversible jump remains active with non-reversible jump in that the move from one model to the next must produce plausible values. The paper recalls two methods proposed by Christophe Andrieu and his co-authors. One consists in buffering a tempering sequence, but this proves costly.  Pursuing the interesting underlying theme that both reversible and non-reversible versions are noisy approximations of the marginal ratio, the other one consists in marginalising out the parameter to approximate the marginal probability of moving between nearby models. Combined with multiple choice to preserve stationarity and select more likely moves at the same time. Still requiring a multiplication of the number of simulations but parallelisable. The paper contains an exact comparison result that non-reversible jump leads to a smaller asymptotic variance than reversible jump, but it is unclear to me whether or not this accounts for the extra computing time resulting from the multiple paths in the proposed algorithms. (Even though the numerical illustration shows an improvement brought by the non-reversible side for the same computational budget.)

Non-reversible Markov Chains for Monte Carlo sampling

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 24, 2015 by xi'an

the pond in front of the Zeeman building, University of Warwick, July 01, 2014This “week in Warwick” was not chosen at random as I was aware there is a workshop on non-reversible MCMC going on. (Even though CRiSM sponsored so many workshops in September that almost any week would have worked for the above sentence!) It has always been kind of a mystery to me that non-reversibility could make a massive difference in practice, even though I am quite aware that it does. And I can grasp some of the theoretical arguments why it does. So it was quite rewarding to sit in this Warwick amphitheatre and learn about overdamped Langevin algorithms and other non-reversible diffusions, to see results where convergence times moved from n to √n, and to grasp some of the appeal of lifting albeit in finite state spaces. Plus, the cartoon presentation of Hamiltonian Monte Carlo by Michael Betancourt was a great moment, not only because of the satellite bursting into flames on the screen but also because it gave a very welcome intuition about why reversibility was inefficient and HMC appealing. So I am grateful to my two colleagues, Joris Bierkens and Gareth Roberts, for organising this exciting workshop, with a most profitable scheduling favouring long and few talks. My next visit to Warwick will also coincide with a workshop on intractable likelihood, next November. This time part of the new Alan Turing Institute programme.