Archive for logic journal of the IGPL

sleeping beauty

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 24, 2016 by xi'an

Through X validated, W. Huber made me aware of this probability paradox [or para-paradox] of which I had never heard before. One of many guises of this paradox goes as follows:

Shahrazad is put to sleep on Sunday night. Depending on the hidden toss of a fair coin, she is awaken either once (Heads) or twice (Tails). After each awakening, she gets back to sleep and forget that awakening. When awakened, what should her probability of Heads be?

My first reaction is to argue that Shahrazad does not gain information between the time she goes to sleep when the coin is fair and the time(s) she is awaken, apart from being awaken, since she does not know how many times she has been awaken, so the probability of Heads remains ½. However, when thinking more about it on my bike ride to work, I thought of the problem as a decision theory or betting problem, which makes ⅓ the optimal answer.

I then read [if not the huge literature] a rather extensive analysis of the paradox by Ciweski, Kadane, Schervish, Seidenfeld, and Stern (CKS³), which concludes at roughly the same thing, namely that, when Monday is completely exchangeable with Tuesday, meaning that no event can bring any indication to Shahrazad of which day it is, the posterior probability of Heads does not change (Corollary 1) but that a fair betting strategy is p=1/3, with the somewhat confusing remark by CKS³ that this may differ from her credence. But then what is the point of the experiment? Or what is the meaning of credence? If Shahrazad is asked for an answer, there must be a utility or a penalty involved otherwise she could as well reply with a probability of p=-3.14 or p=10.56… This makes for another ill-defined aspect of the “paradox”.

Another remark about this ill-posed nature of the experiment is that, when imagining running an ABC experiment, I could only come with one where the fair coin is thrown (Heads or Tails) and a day (Monday or Tuesday) is chosen at random. Then every proposal (Heads or Tails) is accepted as an awakening, hence the posterior on Heads is the uniform prior. The same would not occurs if we consider the pair of awakenings under Tails as two occurrences of (p,E), but this does not sound (as) correct since Shahrazad only knows of one E: to paraphrase Jeffreys, this is an unobservable result that may have not occurred. (Or in other words, Bayesian learning is not possible on Groundhog Day!)

full Bayesian significance test

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 18, 2014 by xi'an

Among the many comments (thanks!) I received when posting our Testing via mixture estimation paper came the suggestion to relate this approach to the notion of full Bayesian significance test (FBST) developed by (Julio, not Hal) Stern and Pereira, from São Paulo, Brazil. I thus had a look at this alternative and read the Bayesian Analysis paper they published in 2008, as well as a paper recently published in Logic Journal of IGPL. (I could not find what the IGPL stands for.) The central notion in these papers is the e-value, which provides the posterior probability that the posterior density is larger than the largest posterior density over the null set. This definition bothers me, first because the null set has a measure equal to zero under an absolutely continuous prior (BA, p.82). Hence the posterior density is defined in an arbitrary manner over the null set and the maximum is itself arbitrary. (An issue that invalidates my 1993 version of the Lindley-Jeffreys paradox!) And second because it considers the posterior probability of an event that does not exist a priori, being conditional on the data. This sounds in fact quite similar to Statistical Inference, Murray Aitkin’s (2009) book using a posterior distribution of the likelihood function. With the same drawback of using the data twice. And the other issues discussed in our commentary of the book. (As a side-much-on-the-side remark, the authors incidentally  forgot me when citing our 1992 Annals of Statistics paper about decision theory on accuracy estimators..!)