Archive for medical school

pictures at an exhibition

Posted in Kids, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , , on November 25, 2017 by xi'an

Last weekend we went to a local cultural centre to check on the exhibit of pictures from Madagascar our daughter and her friends had set to a month, following their humanitarian trip there last summer that was supported in part by the town council. While we had already seem these pictures, it was nice to see them in perspective. Hopefully inducing more volunteers to spend time in this particularly poor country, facing a silent humanitarian crisis. Including numerous cases of pneumonic plague… Donations can be made to MadaClinics, the NGO supporting medical rural centres. (USAid also has a program specifically aimed at Madagascar.)

humanitarian project in Madagascar

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 15, 2017 by xi'an

As the budget of the humanitarian trip to Madagascar our daughter organises with other students of the Paris-Sud Medical School next summer is still short of several thousand euros, I repost the call for support I made a few months ago.

Their project is called Mada Tsatsaka, mada for Madagascar and tsatsaka for a local lizard. The team plans to bring basic drugs and educational material and to work in a dispensary, an orphanage, as well as a shelter for women victims of violence. (More below!)

I thus bring this project to the ‘Og’s readers’ attention in case they wish to support. The best approach is use this web site for donations (in English) to Evadeh Mada Tsatsaka. (Evadeh is the mother association for all humanitarian projects in the medical school.) A free-of-charge (!) alternative is to shop on amazon.com following this associate link as I vouch to transfer all my associate gains in the next four months to the project.

Upon request, more details on the project:

  • 2 weeks in Maventibao working in a clinic : Mada Clinics, helping two nurses with free medical examinations and providing extra medical equipment and drugs. And also helping with drinking water improvement. The team further hopes to help with the purchase of a car associated with the clinic and linking with the hospital in  Diego (4h away) and with hiring a doctor in the nearby clinic of Amboangamamy.
  • 2 weeks in an orphanage in Antananarivo, Ankanifitahiana, in collaboration with BLOC Léo Madagascar, helping in financing and installing a library and a music room, and participating in classes and games with the children. Depending on the funding, the team would also like to help with installing a solar oven.

Mada Tsatsaka

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , on December 17, 2016 by xi'an

Along with other students of the Paris-Sud Medical School, our daughter is planning a humanitarian trip to Madagascar next summer, following a long-term tradition in her school with groups sent to Madagascar as well as Vietnam, Peru and Nepal. The project is called Mada Tsatsaka, mada for Madagascar and tsatsaka for a local lizard. They plan to bring basic drugs and educational material and to work in a dispensary, an orphanage, as well as a shelter for women victims of violence. They have been now working for several months at meeting the budget for this project, from selling pies and quiches on local markets (I helped with the quiches!) to wrapping gifts at supermakets all around, to engaging local authorities and charities, but are still far from reaching this goal.

I thus bring this project to the ‘Og’s readers’ attention in case they wish to support. The best approach is use this donation form (in English) for Evadeh Mada Tsatsaka. A free of charge (!) alternative is to shop on amazon.com following this associate link as I vouch to transfer all my associate gains in the next six months to the project.

the Force awakens… some memories

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, Travel with tags , , , , , , on January 10, 2016 by xi'an

In what may become a family tradition, I managed to accompany my daughter to the movies on the day off she takes just before her medical school finals. After last year catastrophic conclusion to the Hobbit trilogy, we went to watch the new Star Wars on the day it appeared in Paris. (Which involved me going directly to the movie theatre from the airport, on my way back from Warwick.) I am afraid I have to admit I enjoyed the movie a lot, despite my initial misgivings and the blatant shortcomings of this new instalment.

Indeed, it somewhat brought back [to me] the magic of watching the very first Star Wars, in the summer of 1977 and in a theatre located in down-town Birmingham, to make the connection complete! A new generation of (admittedly implausible) heroes takes over with very little help from the (equally implausible) old guys (so far). It is just brilliant to watch the scenario unfold towards the development of those characters and tant pis! if the battle scenes and the fighters and the whole Star Wars universe has not changed that much. While the new director has recovered the pace of the original film, he also builds the relations between most characters towards more depth and ambiguity. Once again, I like very much the way the original characters are treated, with just the right distance and irony, a position that would not have been possible with new actors. And again tant pis! if the new heroes share too much with the central characters of Hunger Games or The Maze Runner. This choice definitely appealed to my daughter, who did not complain in the least about the weaknesses in the scenario and about the very stretched ending. To the point of watching the movie a second time during the X’mas vacations.

triste célébration for World Statistics Day

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , on October 21, 2015 by xi'an

As I was discussing yesterday night with my daughter about a practice stats exam she had just taken in medical school, I came upon the following question:

What is the probability that women have the same risk of cancer as men in the entire population given that the selected sample concluded against equality?

Which just means nothing, since conditioning on the observed event, say |X|>1.96, cancels any probabilistic structure in the problem. Worse, I have no idea what is the expected answer to this question!

first semester notes

Posted in Kids, pictures, University life with tags , on December 27, 2014 by xi'an

IMG_0373

prayers and chi-square

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , on November 25, 2014 by xi'an

One study I spotted in Richard Dawkins’ The God delusion this summer by the lake is a study of the (im)possible impact of prayer over patient’s recovery. As a coincidence, my daughter got this problem in her statistics class of last week (my translation):

1802 patients in 6 US hospitals have been divided into three groups. Members in group A was told that unspecified religious communities would pray for them nominally, while patients in groups B and C did not know if anyone prayed for them. Those in group B had communities praying for them while those in group C did not. After 14 days of prayer, the conditions of the patients were as follows:

  • out of 604 patients in group A, the condition of 249 had significantly worsened;
  • out of 601 patients in group B, the condition of 289 had significantly worsened;
  • out of 597 patients in group C, the condition of 293 had significantly worsened.

 Use a chi-square procedure to test the homogeneity between the three groups, a significant impact of prayers, and a placebo effect of prayer.

This may sound a wee bit weird for a school test, but she is in medical school after all so it is a good way to enforce rational thinking while learning about the chi-square test! (Answers: [even though the data is too sparse to clearly support a decision, esp. when using the chi-square test!] homogeneity and placebo effect are acceptable assumptions at level 5%, while the prayer effect is not [if barely].)