Archive for modelling

new reproducibility initiative in TOMACS

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 12, 2016 by xi'an

[A quite significant announcement last October from TOMACS that I had missed:]

To improve the reproducibility of modeling and simulation research, TOMACS  is pursuing two strategies.

Number one: authors are encouraged to include sufficient information about the core steps of the scientific process leading to the presented research results and to make as many of these steps as transparent as possible, e.g., data, model, experiment settings, incl. methods and configurations, and/or software. Associate editors and reviewers will be asked to assess the paper also with respect to this information. Thus, although not required, submitted manuscripts which provide clear information on how to generate reproducible results, whenever possible, will be considered favorably in the decision process by reviewers and the editors.

Number two: we will form a new replicating computational results activity in modeling and simulation as part of the peer reviewing process (adopting the procedure RCR of ACM TOMS). Authors who are interested in taking part in the RCR activity should announce this in the cover letter. The associate editor and editor in chief will assign a RCR reviewer for this submission. This reviewer will contact the authors and will work together with the authors to replicate the research results presented. Accepted papers that successfully undergo this procedure will be advertised at the TOMACS web page and will be marked with an ACM reproducibility brand. The RCR activity will take place in parallel to the usual reviewing process. The reviewer will write a short report which will be published alongside the original publication. TOMACS also plans to publish short reports about lessons learned from non-successful RCR activities.

[And now the first paper reviewed according to this protocol has been accepted:]

The paper Automatic Moment-Closure Approximation of Spatially Distributed Collective Adaptive Systems is the first paper that took part in the new replicating computational results (RCR) activity of TOMACS. The paper completed successfully the additional reviewing as documented in its RCR report. This reviewing is aimed at ensuring that computational results presented in the paper are replicable. Digital artifacts like software, mechanized proofs, data sets, test suites, or models, are evaluated referring to ease of use, consistency, completeness, and being well documented.

Statistics and Computing special issue on BNP

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , on June 16, 2015 by xi'an

[verbatim from the call for papers:]

Statistics and Computing is preparing a special issue on Bayesian Nonparametrics, for publication by early 2016. We invite researchers to submit manuscripts for publication in the special issue. We expect that the focus theme will increase the visibility and impact of papers in the volume.

By making use of infinite-dimensional mathematical structures, Bayesian nonparametric statistics allows the complexity of a learned model to grow as the size of a data set grows. This flexibility can be particularly suited to modern data sets but can also present a number of computational and modelling challenges. In this special issue, we will showcase novel applications of Bayesian nonparametric models, new computational tools and algorithms for learning these models, and new models for the diverse structures and relations that may be present in data.

To submit to the special issue, please use the Statistics and Computing online submission system. To indicate consideration for the special issue, choose “Special Issue: Bayesian Nonparametrics” as the article type. Papers must be prepared in accordance with the Statistics and Computing journal guidelines.

Papers will go through the usual peer review process. The special issue website will be updated with any relevant deadlines and information.

Deadline for manuscript submission: August 20, 2015

Guest editors:
Tamara Broderick (MIT)
Katherine Heller (Duke)
Peter Mueller (UT Austin)