Archive for Monte Carlo Statistical Methods

slice sampling for Dirichlet mixture process

Posted in Books, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , , on June 21, 2017 by xi'an

When working with my PhD student Changye in Dauphine this morning I realised that slice sampling also applies to discrete support distributions and could even be of use in such settings. That it works is (now) straightforward in that the missing variable representation behind the slice sampler also applies to densities defined with respect to a discrete measure. That this is useful transpires from the short paper of Stephen Walker (2007) where we saw this, as Stephen relies on the slice sampler to sample from the Dirichlet mixture model by eliminating the tail problem associated with this distribution. (This paper appeared in Communications in Statistics and it is through Pati & Dunson (2014) taking advantage of this trick that Changye found about its very existence. I may have known about it in an earlier life, but I had clearly forgotten everything!)

While the prior distribution (of the weights) of the Dirichlet mixture process is easy to generate via the stick breaking representation, the posterior distribution is trickier as the weights are multiplied by the values of the sampling distribution (likelihood) at the corresponding parameter values and they cannot be normalised. Introducing a uniform to replace all weights in the mixture with an indicator that the uniform is less than those weights corresponds to a (latent variable) completion [or a demarginalisation as we called this trick in Monte Carlo Statistical Methods]. As elaborated in the paper, the Gibbs steps corresponding to this completion are easy to implement, involving only a finite number of components. Meaning the allocation to a component of the mixture can be operated rather efficiently. Or not when considering that the weights in the Dirichlet mixture are not monotone, hence that a large number of them may need to be computed before picking the next index in the mixture when the uniform draw happens to be quite small.

convergence of MCMC

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 16, 2017 by xi'an

Michael Betancourt just posted on arXiv an historical  review piece on the convergence of MCMC, with a physical perspective.

“The success of these of Markov chain Monte Carlo, however, contributed to its own demise.”

The discourse proceeds through augmented [reality!] versions of MCMC algorithms taking advantage of the shape and nature of the target distribution, like Langevin diffusions [which cannot be simulated directly and exactly at the same time] in statistics and molecular dynamics in physics. (Which reminded me of the two parallel threads at the ICMS workshop we had a few years ago.) Merging into hybrid Monte Carlo, morphing into Hamiltonian Monte Carlo under the quills of Radford Neal and David MacKay in the 1990’s. It is a short entry (and so is this post), with some background already well-known to the community, but it nonetheless provides a perspective and references rarely mentioned in statistics.

thinning a Markov chain, statistically

Posted in Books, pictures, R, Statistics with tags , , , , , , on June 13, 2017 by xi'an

Art Owen has arXived a new version of his thinning MCMC paper, where he studies how thinning or subsampling can improve computing time in MCMC chains. I remember quite well the message set by Mark Berliner and Steve MacEachern in an early 1990’s paper that subsampling was always increasing the variance of the resulting estimators. We actually have this result in our Monte Carlo Statistical Methods book. Now, there are other perspectives on this, as for instance cases when thinning can be hard-wired by simulating directly a k-step move, delaying rejection or acceptance, prefetching, or simulating directly the accepted values as in our vanilla Rao-Blackwellisation approach. Here, Art considers the case when there is a cost θ of computing a transform of the simulation [when the transition cost a unit] and when those transforms are positively correlated with correlation ρ. Somewhat unsurprisingly, when θ is large enough, thinning becomes worth implementing. But requires extra computations in evaluating the correlation ρ and the cost θ, which is rarely comparable with the cost of computing the likelihood itself, a requirement for the Metropolis-Hastings or Hamiltonian Monte Carlo step(s).  Subsampling while keeping the right target (which is a hard constraint!) should thus have a much more effective impact on computing budgets.

accelerating MCMC

Posted in Statistics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2017 by xi'an

I have recently [well, not so recently!] been asked to write a review paper on ways of accelerating MCMC algorithms for the [review] journal WIREs Computational Statistics and would welcome all suggestions towards the goal of accelerating MCMC algorithms. Besides [and including more on]

  • coupling strategies using different kernels and switching between them;
  • tempering strategies using flatter or lower dimensional targets as intermediary steps, e.g., à la Neal;
  • sequential Monte Carlo with particle systems targeting again flatter or lower dimensional targets and adapting proposals to this effect;
  • Hamiltonian MCMC, again with connections to Radford (and more generally ways of avoiding rejections);
  • adaptive MCMC, obviously;
  • Rao-Blackwellisation, just as obviously (in the sense that increasing the precision in the resulting estimates means less simulations).

ARS: when to update?

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on May 25, 2017 by xi'an

An email I got today from Heng Zhou wondered about the validity of the above form of the ARS algorithm. As printed in our book Monte Carlo Statistical Methods. The worry is that in the original version of the algorithm the envelope of the log-concave target f(.) is only updated for rejected values. My reply to the question is that there is no difference in the versions towards returning a value simulated from f, since changing the envelope between simulations does not modify the accept-reject nature of the algorithm. There is no issue of dependence between the simulations of this adaptive accept-reject method, all simulations remain independent. The question is rather one about efficiency, namely does it pay to update the envelope(s) when accepting a new value and I think it does because the costly part is the computation of f(x), rather than the call to the piecewise-exponential envelope. Correct me if I am wrong!

and another one on nested sampling

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , on May 2, 2017 by xi'an

The same authors as those of the paper discussed last week arXived a paper on dynamic nested sampling.

“We propose modifying the nested sampling algorithm by dynamically varying the number of “live points” in order to maximise the accuracy of a calculation for some number of posterior sample.”

Some of the material is actually quite similar to the previous paper (to the point I had to check they were not the same paper). The authors rightly point out that the main source of variation in the nested sampling approximation is due to the Monte Carlo variability in the estimated volume of the level sets.

The main notion in that paper is that it is acceptable to have a varying number of “live” points in nested sampling provided the weights are correctly accordingly. Adding more of those points as a new “thread” in a region where the likelihood changes rapidly. Addition may occur at any level of the likelihood, in fact, and is determined  in the paper by an importance weight being in the upper tail of the importance weights… While the description is rather vague [for instance I do not get the notation in (9)] and the criteria for adding threads somewhat arbitrary, I find interesting that several passes at different precision levels can improve the efficiency of the nested approximation at a given simulation cost. Remains the issue of whether or not this is a sufficient perk for attracting users of other simulation techniques to the nested galaxy…

Bayes Comp 2018

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 28, 2017 by xi'an

After a rather extended wait, I learned today of the dates of the next MCMski conference, now called Bayes Comp, in Barcelona, Spain, March 26-29, next year (2018). With a cool webpage! (While the ski termination has been removed from the conference name, there are ski resorts located not too far from Barcelona, in the Pyrenees.) Just unfortunate that it happens at the same dates as the ENAR 2018 meeting. (And with the Gregynog Statistical Conference!)