Archive for Monte Carlo Statistical Methods

ARS: when to update?

Posted in Books, Kids, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , on May 25, 2017 by xi'an

An email I got today from Heng Zhou wondered about the validity of the above form of the ARS algorithm. As printed in our book Monte Carlo Statistical Methods. The worry is that in the original version of the algorithm the envelope of the log-concave target f(.) is only updated for rejected values. My reply to the question is that there is no difference in the versions towards returning a value simulated from f, since changing the envelope between simulations does not modify the accept-reject nature of the algorithm. There is no issue of dependence between the simulations of this adaptive accept-reject method, all simulations remain independent. The question is rather one about efficiency, namely does it pay to update the envelope(s) when accepting a new value and I think it does because the costly part is the computation of f(x), rather than the call to the piecewise-exponential envelope. Correct me if I am wrong!

and another one on nested sampling

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , on May 2, 2017 by xi'an

The same authors as those of the paper discussed last week arXived a paper on dynamic nested sampling.

“We propose modifying the nested sampling algorithm by dynamically varying the number of “live points” in order to maximise the accuracy of a calculation for some number of posterior sample.”

Some of the material is actually quite similar to the previous paper (to the point I had to check they were not the same paper). The authors rightly point out that the main source of variation in the nested sampling approximation is due to the Monte Carlo variability in the estimated volume of the level sets.

The main notion in that paper is that it is acceptable to have a varying number of “live” points in nested sampling provided the weights are correctly accordingly. Adding more of those points as a new “thread” in a region where the likelihood changes rapidly. Addition may occur at any level of the likelihood, in fact, and is determined  in the paper by an importance weight being in the upper tail of the importance weights… While the description is rather vague [for instance I do not get the notation in (9)] and the criteria for adding threads somewhat arbitrary, I find interesting that several passes at different precision levels can improve the efficiency of the nested approximation at a given simulation cost. Remains the issue of whether or not this is a sufficient perk for attracting users of other simulation techniques to the nested galaxy…

Bayes Comp 2018

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 28, 2017 by xi'an

After a rather extended wait, I learned today of the dates of the next MCMski conference, now called Bayes Comp, in Barcelona, Spain, March 26-29, next year (2018). With a cool webpage! (While the ski termination has been removed from the conference name, there are ski resorts located not too far from Barcelona, in the Pyrenees.) Just unfortunate that it happens at the same dates as the ENAR 2018 meeting. (And with the Gregynog Statistical Conference!)

what does more efficient Monte Carlo mean?

Posted in Books, Kids, R, Statistics with tags , , , , , , on March 17, 2017 by xi'an

“I was just thinking that there might be a magic trick to simulate directly from this distribution without having to go for less efficient methods.”

In a simple question on X validated a few days ago [about simulating from x²φ(x)] popped up the remark that the person asking the question wanted a direct simulation method for higher efficiency. Compared with an accept-reject solution. Which shows a misunderstanding of what “efficiency” means on Monte Carlo situations. If it means anything, I would think it is reflected in the average time taken to return one simulation and possibly in the worst case. But there is no reason to call an inverse cdf method more efficient than an accept reject or a transform approach since it all depends on the time it takes to make the inversion compared with the other solutions… Since inverting the closed-form cdf in this example is much more expensive than generating a Gamma(½,½), and taking plus or minus its root, this is certainly the case here. Maybe a ziggurat method could be devised, especially since x²φ(x)<φ(x) when |x|≤1, but I am not sure it is worth the effort!

MCM 2017

Posted in pictures, Statistics, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 10, 2017 by xi'an

Je reviendrai à Montréal, as the song by Robert Charlebois goes, for the MCM 2017 meeting there, on July 3-7. I was invited to give a plenary talk by the organisers of the conference . Along with

Steffen Dereich, WWU Münster, Germany
Paul Dupuis, Brown University, Providence, USA
Mark Girolami, Imperial College London, UK
Emmanuel Gobet, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France
Aicke Hinrichs, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
Alexander Keller, NVIDIA Research, Germany
Gunther Leobacher, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
Art B. Owen, Stanford University, USA

Note that, while special sessions are already selected, including oneon Stochastic Gradient methods for Monte Carlo and Variational Inference, organised by Victor Elvira and Ingmar Schuster (my only contribution to this session being the suggestion they organise it!), proposals for contributed talks will be selected based on one-page abstracts, to be submitted by March 1.

an accurate variance approximation

Posted in Books, Kids, pictures, R, Statistics with tags , , , , , , on February 7, 2017 by xi'an

In answering a simple question on X validated about producing Monte Carlo estimates of the variance of estimators of exp(-θ) in a Poisson model, I wanted to illustrate the accuracy of these estimates against the theoretical values. While one case was easy, since the estimator was a Binomial B(n,exp(-θ)) variate [in yellow on the graph], the other one being the exponential of the negative of the Poisson sample average did not enjoy a closed-form variance and I instead used a first order (δ-method) approximation for this variance which ended up working surprisingly well [in brown] given that the experiment is based on an n=20 sample size.

Thanks to the comments of George Henry, I stand corrected: the variance of the exponential version is easily manageable with two lines of summation! As

\text{var}(\exp\{-\bar{X}_n\})=\exp\left\{-n\theta[1-\exp\{-2/n\}]\right\}

-\exp\left\{-2n\theta[1-\exp\{-1/n\}]\right\}

which allows for a comparison with its second order Taylor approximation:

compar

weakly informative reparameterisations for location-scale mixtures

Posted in Books, pictures, R, Statistics, University life with tags , , , , , , on January 19, 2017 by xi'an

fitted_density_galaxy_data_500itersWe have been working towards a revision of our reparameterisation paper for quite a while now and too advantage of Kate Lee visiting Paris this fortnight to make a final round: we have now arXived (and submitted) the new version. The major change against the earlier version is the extension of the approach to a large class of models that include infinitely divisible distributions, compound Gaussian, Poisson, and exponential distributions, and completely monotonic densities. The concept remains identical: change the parameterisation of a mixture from a component-wise decomposition to a construct made of the first moment(s) of the distribution and of component-wise objects constrained by the moment equation(s). There is of course a bijection between both parameterisations, but the constraints appearing in the latter produce compact parameter spaces for which (different) uniform priors can be proposed. While the resulting posteriors are no longer conjugate, even conditional on the latent variables, standard Metropolis algorithms can be implemented to produce Monte Carlo approximations of these posteriors.