Archive for Morgiou

ISBA 2021.1

Posted in Kids, Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 29, 2021 by xi'an

An infinite (mixture) session was truly the first one I could attend on Day 1, as a heap of unexpected last minute issues kept me busy or on hedge for the beginning of the day (if not preventing me from a dawn dip in Calanque de Morgiou). Using the CIRM video system for zoom talked required more preparation than I had thought and we made it barely in time for the first session, while I had to store zoom links for all speakers present in Luminy.  Plus allocate sessions to the rooms provided by CIRM, twice since there was a mishap with the other workshop present at CIRM. And reassuring speakers, made anxious by the absence of a clear schedule. Chairing the second ABC session was also a tense moment, from checking every speaker could connect and share slides, to ensuring they kept on schedule (and they did on both!, ta’), to checking for questions at the end. Spotting a possible connection between Takuo Mastubara’s Stein’s approximation for in the ABC setup and a related paper by Liu and Lee I had read just a few days ago. Alas, it was too early to relax as an inverter in the CIRM room burned and led to a local power failure. Fortunately this was restored prior to the mixture session! (As several boars were spotted on the campus yesternight, I hope no tragic encounter happens before the end of the meeting!!!) So the mixture session proposed new visions on infering K, the number of components, some of which reminded me of… my first talk at CIRM where I was trying to get rid of empty components at each MCMC step, albeit in a much more rudimentary way obviously. And later had the wonderful surprise of hearing Xiao-Li’s lecture start by an excerpt from Car Talk, the hilarious Sunday morning radio talk-show about the art of used car maintenance on National Public Radio (NPR) that George Casella could not miss (and where a letter he wrote them about a mistaken probability computation was mentioned!). The final session of the day was an invited ABC session I chaired (after being exfiltrated from the CIRM dinner table!) with Kate Lee, Ryan Giordano, and Julien Stoehr as speakers. Besides Julien’s talk on our Gibbs-ABC paper, both other talks shared a concern with the frequentist properties of the ABC posterior, either to be used as a control tool or as a faster assessment of the variability of the (Monte Carlo) ABC output.

climbing Lothlorien in Middle Earth

Posted in Mountains, pictures, Travel, University life with tags , , , , , , on March 3, 2016 by xi'an

of For the Wednesday. afafternoon break of the Bayesian week at CIRM, a few of us enquired about the possibility of going climbing together and thanks to the good will of local Bayesian climbers ended effectively climbing on a nice type of rock with tiny finger holes! The set of routes was called Middle Earth (located near the notorious jail of Les Beaumettes and on the road to the Calanque de Morgiou) and the routes named after places in the Lord of the Rings. This was my first outdoor climb since the Cascades and while I was not in any way properly trained, I enjoyed this afternoon tremendously, no less for climbing a route called Lothlorien! (There are also Rohan and Gondor if you are partial to those other places…) But also for having a great time with old and new friends, in very mild weather and away from the blistery mistral wind. And for this residual tingling feeling at the end of my fingers…

fit for Les Calanques

Posted in Mountains, Running with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 1, 2016 by xi'an

Bayesian week in a statistics month at CIRM

Posted in Books, Mountains, pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel, University life, Wines with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2016 by xi'an

Calanque de Morgiou, Marseille, July 7, 2010As posted earlier, this week is a Bayesian week at CIRM, the French mathematical society centre near Marseilles. Where we meet with about 80 researchers and students interested in Bayesian statistics, from all possible sides. (And possibly in climbing in the Calanques and trail running, if not swimming at this time of year…) With Jean-Michel we will be teaching a short course on Bayesian computational methods, namely ABC and MCMC, over the first two days… Here are my slides for the MCMC side:

As should be obvious from the first slides, this is a very introductory course that should only appeal to students with no previous exposure. The remainder of the week will see advanced talks on the state-of-the-art Bayesian computational methods, including some on noisy MCMC and on the mysterious expectation-propagation technique.

le théorème de l’engambi

Posted in Books, Statistics with tags , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by xi'an

When I climbed in Luminy last year, one of the ways was called le théorème de l’engambi. Looking on the internet, I found this was the title of a book written by a local, Maurice Gouiran. The other evening, at the airport, the book was on sale in the bookstore, so I bought it and read it in the plane back to Paris. It is a local crime novel with highly local characters (to the point I do not understand all they say), local places like l’Estaque, the OM football club, La Gineste, Luminy, and what is apparently the most appealing theorem in novels, Fermat’s last theorem! (Engambi means messy affair in local dialect.) Overall the book is more pleasant to read for the local flavour than for the crime enquiry per se, especially because it involves scenes that take place in CIRM itself (including the restaurant and the terrace outside under the old oaks!). There is of course no indication on the nature of the three page proof produced by the first corpse of the book, but the description of the mathematical community is rather accurate, overall. The author mentions in a postnote that he is aware of Wiles’ proof, but believes (as a poet) in an alternative proof that Fermat had really found. (This book is not to be confused with Guedj’s parrot theorem, which is a novelesque story of mathematics, even though it ends up on the same premise that a parrot could recite Fermat’s proof…)